Good News and Information about Ixtapa Zihuatanejo, Guerrero, México

Category : World

Enter the International Essay Contest for Young People – You Can Win a Trip to Japan!

By: Patricia Ann Talley, Editor and Representative in Mexico for Peace Pals International™

Kids and young people in Ixtapa, Zihuatanejo, Barra de Potosi, Troncones and all other areas – It’s time to ROCK! The theme of this year’s International Essay Contest for Young People is “Learning from Nature.”  That’s perfect for us!

And, we’re giving a “shout out” to our friends in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico City, Morelia, Cuernavaca, and other areas throughout Mexico to join us!

Young people, up to 25, who live anywhere in the world, can participate! And, the Grand Prize is a trip to Tokyo, Japan!

The International Essay Contest for Young People is one of the youth education programs organized by the Goi Peace Foundation in Tokyo, Japan. Started in 2000, the annual contest aims to harness the energy, creativity and initiative of the world’s youth in promoting a culture of peace and sustainable development, and to inspire society to learn from its young minds and think about how each of us can make a difference in the world. The theme for the 2017 competition is “Learning from Nature.”

Modern civilization has developed through controlling nature and exploiting its resources. At the same time, we human beings are part of the natural world, and nature has many things to teach us. Scientists, philosophers, poets, and artists have all found inspiration in nature.

What can we learn from nature, and how can we make use of that learning for the future? Please describe your ideas, including your own observations and experiences.

Guidelines:

  1. Essays may be submitted by anyone up to 25 years old (as of June 15, 2017) in one of the following age categories: a) Children, ages up to 14; b) Youth, ages 15 – 25.
  2. Essays must be 700 words or less in English, French, Spanish or German, or 1600 characters or less in Japanese, excluding the essay title and cover page. Essays may be typed or printed.
  3. Essays must have a cover page indicating (1) category (Children or Youth); (2) your essay title (3); your name; (4) address; (5) phone number; (6) e-mail; (7) nationality; (8) age as of June 15, 2017; (9) gender; (10) school name (if applicable); and (11) word count.

Teachers and youth directors may submit a collection of essays from their class or group. Please enclose a list of participants’ names, ages, and the name and contact information of the submitting teacher or director.

  • Entries missing any of the above information will not be considered.
  • Please note that the organizer is unable to confirm receipt of essays or answer individual inquiries concerning contest results.
  1. Entries may be submitted by postal mail or online.
  1. Essays must be original and unpublished. Plagiarized entries will be rejected.
  2. Essays must be written by one person. Co-authored essays are not accepted.
  3. Copyright of the essays entered will be assigned to the organizer.

Deadline:

Entries must be received by June 15, 2017 (23:59 your local time).

Awards:

The following awards will be given in the Children’s category and Youth category respectively:

  • 1st Prize: Certificate, prize of 100,000 Yen (approx. US$880 as of Feb 2017) and gift … 1 entrant
    • 1st prize winners will be invited to the award ceremony to be held in Tokyo, Japan on November 25, 2017 and will receive the Minister of Education Award. (Travel expenses will be covered by the organizer.)
  • 2nd Prize: Certificate, prize of 50,000 Yen (approx. US$440 as of Feb 2017) and gift … 2 entrants
  • 3rd Prize: Certificate and gift … 5 entrants
  • Honorable Mention: Certificate and gift … 25 entrants
  • Additional awards (Recognition for Effort, Best School Award, School Incentive Award) will be given if applicable.

All prize winners will be announced on October 31, 2017 on https://www.goipeace.or.jp/en/work/essay-contest/. Certificates and gifts will be mailed to the winners in December 2017.

Click to download these Guidelines in English or Spanish.

Goi Essay Contest 2017-English

Goi Concurso de Ensayo -2017 – Espanol

And, you can look at samples of past essays: Essay-Contest-2016-Anthology-E

For more information about the Goi Peace Foundation and the International Essay Contest for Young People, please visit http://www.goipeace.or.jp.

Related Articles:

Imagine-Mexico.com/Ixtapa Zihuatanejo Youth to Participate in 2017 Peace Pals International Art Contest- Your Kids Can Too!

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Ixtapa Zihuatanejo Youth to Participate in 2017 Peace Pals International Art Contest – Your Kids Can Too!

By: Patricia Ann Talley, Editor and Representative in Mexico for Peace Pals International™

Teaching kids life lessons through art: That is the goal of the 20th Annual Peace Pals International™ Art Contest. The theme for 2017, “Nature for All ~ Loving the Earth,” is intended to inspire a new generation of thinkers and doers across all sectors of society to connect with nature and take action to support its conservation. Youth, ages 5-16, from around the world are invited to enter the art contest with their drawings about nature and conservation.

Peace Pals International™ and its affiliate, The World Peace Organization, are international not-for-profit charities that promote peace activities for communities and youth. Activities and programs include the annual Peace Pals Art & Exhibition Awards Contest, Planting Peace Poles at schools and in communities following the Peace Pals Activity Guide, and the World Peace Flag Ceremony.

In Ixtapa Zihuatanejo:

The tourist area of Ixtapa Zihuatanejo became affiliated with Peace Pals International™ in 2010, when the community constructed a Peace Pole Monument next to the museum in Zihuatanejo. Plans are currently underway to construct another one in central Ixtapa. In 2015, Ixtapa Zihuatanejo hosted the first tour of the Peace Pals International Art Exhibition in Mexico.

 In 2010, the community constructed a Peace Pole Monument in Zihuatanejo next to the museum. In 2015, Ixtapa Zihuatanejo hosted the first tour of the Peace Pals Art Exhibition in Mexico.

For 2017, Peace Pals is teaming up with the Hotel Association of Ixtapa Zihuatanejo, various schools and tourist-related businesses to help both local youth and kids visiting the area to get involved in the art contest and to learn more about nature and conservation.

Resort hotels like Azul Ixtapa Resort will include participation in the Peace Pals Art Contest in their weekly activities for kids. Local schools, libraries, and cultural centers will also help kids to participate. The Eco-Tianguis Organic Market in Zihuatanejo will have kids collect palm leaves and recycled paper for art canvasses. Turtles, whales, tropical birds, and the ocean – the nature theme is perfect for our kids! Later in the year, hotels and art galleries will host exhibitions of the artwork to help raise funds for educational charities.

INSTRUCTIONS FOR ENTERING THE PEACE PALS ART CONTEST

HELP YOUTH LEARN ABOUT NATURE: The goal is for our youth to participate in the art contest and to and learn more about the theme – “Nature for All ~ Loving the Earth.” Youth are encouraged to draw and paint to express their visions and dreams of loving the earth. If young people need help understanding this theme, we invite adults to visit the #Nature for All website to learn more. You can help by explaining this theme in ways young people will understand.

Questions to inspire youth:

  • What do you do to make the earth more beautiful?
  • What is your favorite element in Nature?
  • Why is it important to take care of animals?
  • Why do we need to take care of the ocean and its creatures?

ENCOURAGE YOUTH TO DRAW: Encourage our youth to draw! All artwork MUST include the message, “May Peace Prevail On Earth” in English and/or your Native Language. All drawings must be done by children, including the writing of “May Peace Prevail On Earth.” Submitted artwork must be done by the artist. Artwork or writing done by an adult will be excluded (Grandma!).

Age Categories:

  • Age Category One: Age 5 – 7
  • Age Category Two: Age 8 – 10
  • Age Category Three: Age 11 – 13
  • Age Category Four: Age 14 – 16

Size: Horizontal or Vertical design: 5” inches x 7” inches/ 12.7 cm x 17.7 cm. All art must be hand drawn, sketched or painted on paper or cardboard.

REGISTER AND ENTER ON LINE: You must register to participate, and help the kids to upload their artwork when it is finished. Please read the rules and follow all directions. CONTEST RULES are in English, Spanish and German. REGISTER NOW!

After you register, you will be given a link to upload the artwork. All artwork must be scanned in high resolution (300 DPI) and saved as a JPG and follow the rules and guidelines. Deadline to receive artwork is July 30, 2017.

PRIZES:  Everyone will receive a participation certificate. Winners will be selected in every age category.

  • First Place Winners ~ Classic White Peace Pole
  • Second Place Winners ~ 17” Desktop Peace Pole
  • Third Place Winners ~ 8” Desktop Peace Pole
  • Finalists ~ Certificates and Assorted Prizes

The winning artwork will be included in Peace Pals Art Exhibition to be displayed in Ixtapa Zihuatanejo and in communities around the world! Winners will be announced in November 2017. Download a copy of these instructions to pass on to others! Peace Pals Art Contest Instructions-2017

May Peace Prevail on Earth!

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Travelers and Overseas Residents – Register & Get Absentee Ballot to Vote in 2017

Message from the United States Embassy in Mexico City (Released: February 28, 2017).

Just voted in November? Still traveling or living overseas? You should register and request your absentee ballot to vote again in 2017 to ensure your election office knows where to send your ballot for any upcoming special elections for federal office. Some states are also holding gubernatorial or other statewide elections this year.

The Federal Voting Assistance Program (FVAP) recommends all overseas U.S. citizens send in a completed Federal Post Card Application (FPCA) early every year. The FPCA is the registration and ballot request form accepted by all states and territories.

You can use the FPCA online assistant, complete the PDF version, or pick up a hardcopy version from your nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate. Be sure your contact information is accurate in case your election office needs to reach you.

If you’d like more information on the Federal Voting Assistance Program or need help with the absentee voting process please go to FVAP.gov or call FVAP at 703-588-1584 (toll free 1-800-438-VOTE or DSN 425-1584) or email vote@fvap.gov.

Toll-free phone numbers from 67 countries are listed at FVAP.gov. Find FVAP on Facebook at facebook.com/DoDFVAP and follow @FVAP on Twitter.

For further information:

  • See the State Department’s travel website for the Worldwide Caution, Travel Warnings, Travel Alerts, and Country Specific Information for Mexico.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive security messages and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Contact the US. Embassy in Mexico City, which is located at Paseo de la Reforma 305, Colonia Cuauhtémoc, 06500. Mexico, D.F. and is open Monday through Friday 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
  • You may also call 55-5080-2000 at any time, press “0”, and ask the switchboard operator to connect you to the duty officer. If you are calling from the United States, call 011-52-55-5080-2000.
  • Contact information for the U.S. Consulates General in Mexico can be found on the US Embassy Mexico City website.
  • Call 1-888-407-4747 toll-free in the United States and Canada or 1-202-501-4444 from other countries from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).
  • Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

This is a public service announcement from: www.Imagine-Mexico.com

Related Articles:

US Travelers Encouraged to Register with Embassy in Mexico City –More Local Contacts Needed

 

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UN Designates 2017 as the International Year of Sustainable Tourism

Announced by: World Tourism Organization

The United Nations 70th General Assembly has designated 2017 as the International Year of Sustainable Tourism for Development. In the context of the universal 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), the International Year aims to support a change in policies, business practices and consumer behavior towards a more sustainable tourism sector that contributes to the SDGs.

“With more than one billion international tourists now traveling the world each year, tourism has become a powerful and trans-formative force that is making a genuine difference in the lives of millions of people. The potential of tourism for sustainable development is considerable.  As one of the world’s leading employment sectors, tourism provides important livelihood opportunities, helping to alleviate poverty and drive inclusive development.”

  – United Nations Secretary-General, Banki-moon, World Tourism Day Message, 2015

The Ministry of Tourism of Mexico, the German National Tourism Board, All Nippon Airways, the Global Tourism Economy Research Centre, Macao, China, the Balearic Islands Tourism Agency, Minube, Amadeus, the European Geoparks Network, The Travel Corporation and DDB are among the first sponsors to join UNWTO to support the program of activities of the Year.

“The International Year of Sustainable Tourism for Development, to be launched in January in Madrid, is a unique opportunity to raise awareness on the contribution of sustainable tourism to development among public and private sector decision-makers and the general public, while mobilizing all stakeholders to work together in making tourism a catalyst for positive change,” said UNWTO Secretary-General Taleb Rifai.

The year will promote tourism’s role in the following five key areas:

  1. Inclusive and sustainable economic growth
  1. Social inclusiveness, employment and poverty reduction
  1. Resource efficiency, environmental protection and climate change
  1. Cultural values, diversity and heritage
  1. Mutual understanding, peace and security

A full program of activities will be unveiled on 18 January on the occasion of the Opening of the International Year.

Ixtapa Zihuatanejo, Guerrero, Mexico will host a Sustainable Tourism program for Travel Agents and International Press on January 10-13, 2017. (See: Travel Agents and Press Invited to Sun & Fun Sustainable Tourism Event in Ixtapa Zihuatanejo on January 10-13, 2017)

Related Articles:

Transforming Our World -The United Nations Agenda for Sustainable Development to 2030

Travel Agents and Press Invited to Sun & Fun Sustainable Tourism Event in Ixtapa Zihuatanejo on January 10-13, 2017

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As Foreign Property Owners, What Rights Do You Have Under Mexican Law?

Given New USA Policies – Could I Lose My Property in Mexico?

By: Agustin Galindo, Attorney at Law*

During these times of economic and political changes, many foreign investors are worried about losing their real estate properties in Mexico as a reprisal to current USA policies against Mexican illegal immigrants and threats of governmental retaliations against companies that invest in Mexico (i.e., Carrier, Ford or General Motors for example).

Many USA citizens and other foreigners have invested in second residences, vacation property, or own hotels or Bed & Breakfast inns in Mexico. Other foreigners live in Mexico full-time and own property.

My response as a Mexican attorney: If you are a property owner in Mexico, whether your property is on the border, coastline or interior; or whether you own it through a bank trust, directly, or through a Mexican corporation; your ownership and possession are protected by one of the most essential guaranties of the Constitution of Mexico (Article 14), that restricts the retroactive application of any law and provides for due process of law.

Thereby, in accordance with the Mexican Constitution, if you are a property owner in Mexico, regardless of the location or type of ownership (bank trust, direct, or through a Mexican corporation), if any new law is issued or the current laws are amended to restrict such ownership, that law or amendment cannot be applied in a retroactive manner. In addition, the Constitution provides that no one can be deprived of ownership or possession without following a legal process before a competent court in accordance to the current rules of procedure.

Again, to summarize your rights as a foreigner under the Constitution of Mexico:

If You Own Property through a Bank Trust: Property that is located on the border or shoreline in Mexico (technically named “restricted zone”) can only be owned by a foreign individual through a bank beneficiary trust with duration of 50 years with the possibility of extension in accordance with the Foreign Investment Law and its regulations. Therefore, even if such laws are amended or abrogated, the Mexican Constitution gives you the right to maintain your beneficiary trust rights over property owned in this manner.

If You Own Property Directly: Property that is located in the interior of the country can be owned directly by a foreigner. In this case, under the Mexican Constitution, your ownership cannot be restricted in any manner, and you will be able to keep such ownership until you transfer it, sell it, or will it to others.

If You Own Property through a Mexican Corporation: Another way for a foreigner to own property in Mexico is by owning shares in a Mexican corporation, and that Mexican corporation owns the property; whether it is on the border, shoreline or in the interior. In the case of owning shares of a Mexican corporation that owns property, such share ownership cannot be restricted, and you will also keep its ownership until you transfer such shares.

My Advice: Don’t be worried about your property rights and investment. Just make sure you have all papers and titles in place.

For your reference, below please find a transcript of part of Article 14 of the Mexican Political Constitution:

“Article 14. No law shall have a retroactive effect against an individual.

No one may be deprived of his/her freedom, properties, possessions or rights, unless a process before the competent court is carried out, wherein all essentials formalities intrinsic to the procedure are fulfilled and pursuant to the laws issued prior to such fact…”

 About the Author: Agustin Galindo is the director of Galindo Abogados, www.galindoabogados.com in Zihuatanejo. You can contact him at galindoabogados@gmail.com.

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Mexico Honors Irish Immigrants on St. Patrick’s Day: The Story of the “San Patricios”

By: Patricia Ann Talley, MBA.

History, like beauty, is in the “eye of the beholder.” History is always told from the cultural perspective of the history writer. That is why countries that are on different sides of a conflict usually have very different historical accounts of that same conflict.

Such is the case in the story of “San Patricios” (St. Patrick’s) Battalion, a United States military group comprised of Irish immigrants, who along with some African-Americans, switched sides to fight for Mexico during the conflict between the countries in the 1840’s. In the USA, the “San Patricios” were considered traitors; they were captured, brutally tortured, branded and hung. In Mexico, they are honored as martyrs of liberty and freedom. Mexico pays tribute to the “San Patricios” on St. Patrick’s Day on March 17th and again on September 13th, the anniversary date that the United States captured Mexico City in 1847.   Irish Soldiers of Mexico - thumbnail

Irish Immigrants in the United States During the 1840’s : The story begins with the Great Famine of the 1840’s, when thousands of people from Ireland came to the Americas to escape hunger and poverty. The Irish immigrant experience in the United States was not easy. The majority of people in the USA were Protestant and they were distrustful of Catholics. Some believed that the Irish were a servant race; they were ostracized from American society.

During this time, many Irish men enlisted in the United States Army as a means to earn money. By the 1840’s, a significant proportion of the enlisted men in the US Army were Catholic immigrants from Ireland and Germany.

Conflicts Over Slavery Lead to the US Military Invasion of Mexico, 1846 – 1848: Both the English and Spanish “conquistadores” (or “colonists,” depending on your perspective) brought human slaves to North America to serve as a labor force. Human slavery was first abolished in Mexico in 1829. Canada abolished slavery in 1833. But, human slavery continued in the United States until 1865, following its Civil War. Thus, for over 30 years, there was a conflict and difference in human philosophy between the “free” nation of Mexico and the “slave” nation of the United States.

Starting in 1822, Anglos from the United States, led by Stephen F. Austin, began settling in the Mexican state of “Coahuila y Tejas” (later known as Texas). Most of these immigrants came from the American south and they brought their slaves with them. When Mexico forbade the institution of slavery in its territory, the U.S. slave-owners continuously sought ways to circumvent the Mexican law.

Tensions grew between the Mexican government and slave-holding immigrants from the United States and came to a head in the Anahuac Disturbances in 1832 and 1835 that helped to precipitate the Texas Revolution in 1836, when American immigrants in Texas declared its independence from Mexico. The Texas Revolution eventually led to the United States military invasion of Mexico from 1846 -1847. The US military, comprised of a significant portion of Irish and German immigrants, was sent to fight the battle.

The “San Patricio Battalion” Switches Sides to Fight for Mexico: The Mexican government, aware of prejudice against Irish immigrants in the United States, started a campaign after the Mexican War broke out, to win the foreigners and Catholics to its cause. The Mexicans urged English and Irish alike to stop fighting on the side of the “Protestant tyrants” and join the Mexicans in driving them out of Mexico.

It is in this historical setting, faced with discrimination and bigotry in the United States, and with the United States in conflict with Mexico over human slavery that some Irish soldiers from the USA decided to switch to the Mexican side. In November 1846, Gen. Antonio López de Santa Anna organized the “San Patricio Battalion,” or St. Patrick’s Company, a name it probably received from its Irish-American leader, John Riley, formerly a member of Company K of the Fifth United States Infantry.

The “Batallón de San Patricio” was made up of mostly Irish and German immigrants, although it included Catholics from many other countries as well, plus some African Americans who escaped from slavery in the American South. They fought at several battles and finally at the Battle of Churubusco, on the outskirts of Mexico City, where more than 70 were captured by US forces and the rest disbanded. Units of the disbanded battalion went on to fight at the Battle for Mexico City.

On September 13, 1847, the US military captured Mexico City at the battle at Chapultepec Castle. Under the command of Col. William S. Harney of the US Army, the condemned men of the “San Patricios” were whipped and fitted with nooses at daybreak, and then left standing on the gallows while the battle raged nearby. They were hung at the moment that the United States flag was raised over the over the castle and the United States Army took control of the city. John Riley, the leader of the battalion, technically deserted before the war between Mexico and the United States was declared, so he could not be hanged. He received fifty lashes and the letter “D” branded on his cheek.

This video from YouTube tells the story of the San Patricios from their perspective. It has received over 140,000 views.

On September 12, 1997, the Mexican government paid special tribute to the soldiers of the San Patricio Battalion who were tortured and hanged in 1847. Mexico’s president at that time was Ernest Zedillo who said,” . . . members of the St. Patrick’s Battalion were executed for following their consciences. We honor the memory of the Irish who gave their lives for Mexico and for human dignity. We also honor our own commitment to cherish their ideals, and to always defend the values for which they occupy a place of honor in our history.”

References and Related Articles:

Irish in America: 1840’s – 1930’s, http://xroads.virginia.edu/~ug03/omara-alwala/irishkennedys.html

SAN PATRICIO BATTALION | The Handbook of Texas Online| Texas State Historical Association (TSHA)

The Irish in Michigan « Seeking Michigan: http://seekingmichigan.org/look/2012/03/13/the-irish-in-michigan

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Transforming Our World: The United Nations Agenda for Sustainable Development to 2030

By: Barbara E. Talley, Education Committee, The Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Task Force.

What kind of world do you want? And, most importantly, what are you going to do to help our world? If we truly want change in our world, EVERYONE needs to do their part: governments, the private sector, civil society, and people like YOU!

To improve our world, the United Nations General Assembly issued specific goals and targets for us to achieve by the year 2030. To sustain the development of our world, we must first look at the world as a system—a system that connects space and time.

World as a System

To sustain the development of our world, we must look at the world as a system that connects space and time.

The United Nations set 17 Sustainable Development Goals that will stimulate action over the next fifteen years in areas of critical importance for humanity and the planet:

PEOPLE: We must work to end poverty and hunger, in all their forms and dimensions, and ensure that all human beings can fulfill their potential in dignity and equality and in a healthy environment.

PLANET: We must work to protect the planet from degradation, including through sustainable consumption and production, sustainably managing its natural resources and taking urgent action on climate change, so that it can support the needs of the present and future generations.

PROSPERITY: We must work to ensure that all human beings can enjoy prosperous and fulfilling lives and that economic, social and technological progress occurs in harmony with nature.

PEACE: We must work to foster peaceful, just, and inclusive societies which are free from fear and violence. There can be no sustainable development without peace, and no peace without sustainable development.

To mobilize the means required to implement this Agenda, we must work to revitalized global partnerships for sustainable development, based on a spirit of strengthened global solidarity, focused in particular on the needs of the poorest and most vulnerable, and with the participation of all countries, all stakeholders, and all people.

Here are our 17 Sustainable Development Goals through 2030:

UN Sustainable Development Goals

UN Goals 1-9

UN Goals 10 - 17

It’s your world. It’s your choice how it will be.

In 2015, Ixtapa Zihuatanejo became an International City of Peace, joining the family of people in over 120 other cities throughout the world that support these United Nations goals.

*About the Author: Mrs. Barbara E. Talley was the former director of the peace center in Southfield, Michigan, USA, and is the founder of the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Task Force in that city. In 2010, she visited Ixtapa Zihuatanejo, and inspired the development of area’s peace education program.

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New World Map Gives Different View of the Planet!

The map of the world that is most commonly used today was designed in 1569 by Belgium geographer Gerardus Mercator (1512-1594) based on the sailing routes of that time. While this map is still the generally accepted image of our planet, it is flawed in that it dramatically distorts the sizes of the continents and the distance between them. So, an update was well overdue!

The world map most commonly used was designed in 1569 by Belgium geographer Gerardus Mercator (1512-1594) based on the sailing routes of that time.

The AuthaGraph World Map, designed by Hajime Narukawa, won the Grand Award in Japan’s Good Design Award for 2016. This new world map attempts to remedy some of the many inaccuracies in previous models. It more correctly represents the distances between continents and displays the true size of countries and continents. For example, on the old map, Greenland looks to be about the same size as Africa when in actuality, Africa is about fourteen times the size of Greenland. Antarctica, which is depicted on old maps as covering a large and sprawling area, is now much smaller.

The new world map attempts to remedy some of the many inaccuracies in the old model. It more correctly represents the distances between continents and displays the true size of countries and continents.

This new world map is now used in Japanese textbooks. It is hoped that other countries will adopt this more realistic version of the world to provide both students and adults with a truer representation of the great globe on which we live.

Applications for the New Map

There are many applications for this new world map. For example, the size and shape of the ozone hole above Antarctica can more easily be understood, and it is visually clear you need to fly from Tokyo to Brazil via Houston!

But, its use isn’t limited to depicting coastlines. Take continental drift for instance: The 600 million year history of continent movements can be demonstrated with AuthaGraph. India, for example, can be seen breaking away from Madagascar, drifting across the Indian Ocean and colliding with Eurasia to form the Himalayas. Such geological themes can be visually expressed and easily understood.

This new map can also be used to plot historical events for a better understanding of world history. It is possible to show the routes of Colombus and other European explorers.

Narukawa’s innovative idea allows us to visualize the world in new ways. See for yourself!

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US Travelers Encouraged to Register with Embassy in Mexico City/ Updated Information

Register!  United States tourists traveling in Mexico are encouraged to register with the U.S. State Department in case of an emergency situation.  Please register in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) at:  https://step.state.gov/step/. STEP is the primary means that the U.S. Embassy uses to reach its citizens in Mexico.  When you sign up, you will automatically receive email updates, including Travel Warnings and other important announcements such as hurricane warnings, volcano activity, or security messages. state-dept-logo

Equally important, Americans living in Mexico are also encouraged to register for STEP so that they can be reached in case of emergency as well. More information on the program is available at: http://www.travel.state.gov/travel/tips/registration/registration_4789.html.

UNITEDSTATES EMBASSY IN MEXICO CITY – Bookmark or Save in your “Favorites”

Website in English and Spanish: www.usembassy-mexico.gov

Emergencies: http://mexico.usembassy.gov/eng/eacs_hours.html

Emergency Phone: (01-55) 5080-2000 – Press “0” to speak to the Operator and ask for the Duty Officer

Telephones:

From Mexico: Tel: (01-55) 5080-2000/ Fax: (01-55) 5080-2005

From the U.S.: Tel: 011-52-55-5080-2000 / Fax: 011-52-55-5080-2005

Address: Paseo de la Reforma 305, Colonia Cuauhtemoc, 06500 Mexico, D.F.

Embassy Personnel

The American Citizen Services Unit (ACS) has had several personnel changes within the past year. The new management team in ACS is:

  • Lisa Gisvold – ACS Chief and Country Coordinator
  • Mike Flores – ACS Deputy Chief
  • Molly Amador – ACS Deputy Chief for Passports
  • Nick Gray – ACS Deputy Chief for Special Citizen Services

US Consulate Offices and Agencies

For the locations and map of the United States Embassy in Mexico and all Consulate Office and Agencies: Find Nearest Location | Embassy of the United States Mexico City, Mexico

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Canada Eliminates Visa Requirements for Mexicans – Bravo!

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced that Canada will lift its visa requirement for Mexicans to visit the country as of December 2016. The previous Conservative government imposed visas in 2009 to stop asylum claims by Mexican citizens – a controversial move that has been a major irritant between the two countries ever since.canada-flag

Trudeau made the announcement alongside Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto. “This move will make it easier for our Mexican friends to visit Canada while growing our local economies and strengthening our communities,” Trudeau said. He said the two countries “share values, goals and ambitions,” and they aspire to “take action in ways that will make a real difference in people’s lives.”

The two countries agreed to work together to advance the interests of indigenous people, to help women gain access to education, and to foster innovation and entrepreneurship. “The president and I also discussed the need to uphold human rights, advance democracy, and the rule of law, and ensure respect for diversity, as well as the ways in which we can work together to ensure these important goals.”

The visa requirements negatively affected tourism, student studies, and professional immigration. Now, both countries can reap the rewards of cultural and economic interchange and development.

See the press announcement:

Bravo Canada!

Related Articles:

Do You Know What Legal Documents Mexicans Need to Visit the USA or Canada? (Note: The visa requirements for Canada will be lifted as of December 2016.)

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The Story of Thanksgiving as Told by a Mexican!

By: Patricia Ann Talley, Editor.

Thanksgiving is only celebrated in The United States and Canada; it is not a holiday in Mexico. But, since Mexico receives so many tourists from the north, the hotels and restaurants prepare for the occasion. Since Mexicans don’t celebrate it and typically know little about it, I’ve often been asked to explain the meaning of the Thanksgiving celebration.

Up north, there’s the traditional story of how the Pilgrims came to America from Europe to seek religious freedom, and then were helped by the Indians to grow food to survive. After the first harvest, they killed a turkey, and had a great feast to give thanks to God, who had given them the foreign land as their manifest destiny.

Thanksgiving-Brownscombe

But, remember. . . History is always written from the perspective of the victor or dominant culture.

That lesson really hit home to me years ago, when I was working as a language and culture instructor for the hotels in Ixtapa Zihuatanejo, and a concierge in one of my classes asked me to edit the story of Thanksgiving that she had written to put on her desk during for her foreign guests. She was so proud! “I researched it and wrote it all by myself! But, please check my English, Maestra Patty.”

Later that evening, as I sat by the pool – Hey! In Ixtapa Zihuatanejo it’s about 86˚ F during November! – I sat back to edit the concierge’s Thanksgiving Day story. Well, it was written a little differently! It went something like this. . .

“Thanksgiving is a religious holiday for Americans in the north to celebrate when the conquistadors first came to our lands. The conquistadors knew nothing about our land, and did not know how to even grow food. Our people accepted them, taught them, and helped them to survive. They had a big festival to celebrate. This was before the conquistadors took their land.”

Well. . . Surprised me!

I thought about it for a few minutes, and then marked her paper. “The English is fine!”

I tell this story often, because it was one of my first lessons in “decolonizing” history so that it is not told just by the perspective of the European “conquistadors”, but includes the indigenous and African cultures that are also part of the Americas.

We are ALL Americans, and for this, we should give thanks!

MD-HappyThanksgiving_11-2012

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Rotary International – A Global Force for Peace!

By: Patricia Ann Talley*, Editor and Rotarian

With over 1.2 million members, in 35,000 clubs located in 200 different nations, Rotary International is one of the largest service organizations in the world. The organization was started with the vision of one man—Paul P. Harris, a Chicago attorney, who formed the first club in 1905. It is a place where community professionals with diverse backgrounds can exchange ideas and provide service to their local areas. Rotary’s name came from the group’s early practice of rotating meetings among the offices of each member.Rotary International Logo

Rotary is made up of three parts:

  1. Rotary Clubs are the heart of Rotary. Local Rotary clubs bring together dedicated individuals to exchange ideas, build relationships, and take action.
  2. Rotary International supports Rotary Clubs worldwide by coordinating global programs, campaigns, and initiatives.
  3. The Rotary Foundation uses generous donations to fund projects by Rotarians and our partners in communities around the world. As a nonprofit, all of the Foundation’s funding comes from voluntary contributions made by Rotarians and friends who share our vision of a better world.

Rotary’s “6 Areas of Focus”: Together, Rotary Clubs, Rotary International, and The Rotary Foundation work to make lasting improvements in communities and around the world. Projects focus on the following six areas:

club-rotary-6-areas-of-focus

Rotary Action Group for Peace:rotary-for-peace

Formed in 2012, the Rotarian Action Group for Peace (RAG) is a Rotary International approved, autonomous, international group with a passion for a particular type of service. Our passion is PEACE. We are a group of committed Rotarians, Rotarians’ spouses, Rotaractors, Rotary Peace Fellows and other Rotary program alumni working together outside club structures with the help of telecommunications and driven by the common interest of peace.

The Rotarian Action Group for Peace is an official entity that empowers and supports the peace work of Rotarians by offering structure, guidance and resources to further their peace efforts. Rotary International has a very strong commitment to peace efforts around the world.

See this short 5 minute video about Rotary’s peace efforts.

Grants for Rotary Action Group Peace Projects: Rotarians, Rotary Clubs and Districts that wish pursue peace projects may apply to the Rotary Foundation for Global Grants. Peace Projects may be undertaken by Rotarians alone, or collaboratively with Rotary Peace Fellows or Peace organizations with expertise in the area concerned. Awards range from US$15,000 to US$200,000. For more information, go to: Grants: Rotarian Action Group for Peace.

Rotary Clubs in Ixtapa Zihuatanejo: Rotary has two clubs in the area. Club Rotario de Zihuatanejo meets every Wednesday for lunch at 3:00 p.m. at Catalina Beach Resort in Zihuatanejo. Club Rotario de Ixtapa meets on Wednesday evenings at 7:00 p.m. at Hotel Emporio in Ixtapa. The public is invited.

May Peace Prevail on Earth

*Professor Patrica Ann Talley also serves at the Peace Representative for Mexico for the World Peace Prayer Society.

Related Articles:

Transforming Our World: The United Nations Agenda for Sustainable Development to 2030

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The Three Fifths Compromise” – The Most Significant Debate in US History!

By: Alfred E. Talley, Historian.

Editor’s Note: The entire world is watching the 2016 US Presidential debates as the candidates argue over subjects like government policies, race, economic development, and taxation. Let’s take a look back in US history regarding the most significant debate about these same subjects.

The first national debates took place in 1787, when delegates from the new county met for the first time at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia. The delegates elected George Washington to preside over the Convention. The result of the Convention was the creation of the United States Constitution, placing the Convention among the most significant events in the history of the country. It laid the pathway to the country’s future.statue-of-liberty

At the same time that delegates were drafting the US Constitution promising “liberty and justice for all,” one of the most contentious disputes in the Convention was about the abolition of human slavery and its impact on the country’s economics, tax revenues and government representation.

The United States government decided to continue human slavery, but made a “compromise” about how enslaved Africans would be treated – the “Three-Fifths Compromise” that still affects American politics today.

The Three-Fifths Compromise (Article 1, Section 2, Paragraph 3 of the United States Constitution) was an agreement between the Northern and Southern states to define African Americas as “three- fifths of a white person.” This was obviously derogatory as to their status as human beings, but the reasons for the this definition, as stated in the Constitution, were that of tax revenues and government representation.

Constitutional delegates opposed to human slavery (the North) did not want any enslaved Africans to be counted in the national census numbers because they did not have the right to vote. The slave states (the South), however, demanded just the opposite. They wanted enslaved Africans to be counted in the census so that their superior numbers would mean more federal representation. However, the South still rejected the idea for counting slaves for taxing purposes because of paying more in federal taxes. The end result was the “Three-Fifth Compromise.”

three-fifths-compromise-chart

In 1790, the United States passed the first nationalization act granting citizenship only to “free whites.” Human slavery was a serious and contentious issue in the politics of the United States from the Revolutionary War until the Civil War. During the periods between the two, ten of the first twelve American Presidents owed and used enslaved Africans. The two exceptions were John Adams and his son, John Quincy Adams. The last U.S. President to own slaves was the twelfth president, Zachary Taylor.

In 1787, Congress prohibited slavery in the Northwest Territory, however, slavery flourished in the South primarily due to the cotton industry. Cotton became the main reason for the South’s needs for free, enslaved labor due the invention of the cotton gin, which made cotton production increase over five- fold. In 1861, eleven southern states broke from the Union and formed the Confederate States of America. Doing so led to the Civil War.

In 1863, President Lincoln freed the enslaved Africans in the rebellious southern states through the Emancipation Proclamation. In reality, however, at that time it was meaningless because all of the states affected by the Emancipation Proclamation were in the Confederacy and not in the Union.

Human slavery was not outlawed in the United States until 1865 with the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution.  Although human slavery by law ended, a government institutionalized system of racial apartheid and discrimination (Jim Crow) was enacted into laws and practiced in some parts of the land until the Civil Rights Laws were passed in the mid-1960s. The affects of these government policies and laws regarding race, economics, and government representation still remain with us today.

black-lives-matter Sources: 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slavery_in_the_United States (10/15/2012)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wilmot_Proviso (10/13/2012)

Related Articles

Mexicans Go Home? A Video History of Immigration in the USA

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It’s Time to End the Myth of Columbus and Teach Our Kids the Truth About History!

By: Patricia Ann Talley, Editor.

Each year on October 12, the world celebrates Columbus Day, his “discovery” of the Americas, and how he claimed these lands for the spread of Christianity. Undoubtedly, Europeans contributed greatly to the development of the “New World.” But, this date, and the arrival of Columbus has a very different meaning to the indigenous people in the Americas, Africa, and Asia, who lost their lands, who died from foreign diseases, who were enslaved, and whose “non-Christian” cultures were almost destroyed.

What is this so important to ALL of us today?

First, the story of Columbus and the doctrine of “manifest destiny” is one of the first lessons taught to many children in the Americas. Stories refer to the indigenous, non-Christian cultures as “heathens” and “barbarians,” and the story of “manifest destiny” teaches that some people are superior to others. Is this how we want our future generations to think and to govern?

Secondly, and most shockingly, the law – “The Doctrine of Discovery”- that allowed Christian nations to claim non-Christian lands as their “manifest destiny,” and then dominate their people, continues to be the basis of some national and international laws today! 1    

“Decolonizing” our beliefs about history and how we teach our children will make the difference in the future of a world that grows more and more diverse in race, languages, and religions. “Re-thinking” the Columbus myth will make a difference in how we approach this future – whether with bombs and invasion, or with diplomacy and peace negotiations.

Dispelling the Myth of “Discovery”

Due to the European cultural dominance, people generally do not have a vision of the original native lands of the Americas. People, with organized cultures and cities, had inhabited these lands for thousands and thousands of years.

Aztec Map of the Americas

A map of the lands  before Columbus and some of the principles of the “Founding Fathers.”

Message from the Founding Fathers

Christian Law – The Doctrine of Discovery

During the Middle Ages the Christian states of Europe began to unite and to acknowledge the obligation of an international law common for all who professed the same religious faith. This “Law of Christendom,” also known as the “Doctrine of Discovery” provided that, by law and divine intention, European Christian countries gained power and legal rights over indigenous non-Christian peoples and their lands immediately upon their “discovery” by Europeans.

dia-de-la-raza

The “Doctrine of Discovery” gave Christian European nations the “legal right” to dominate the indigenous and claim their lands in the Americas.

To benefit their own countries, various European monarchs and their legal systems developed this principle and “conquered” the lands of the Americas.

EUOPEAN-COLONIES-AMERICAS-1763

European Colonies in the Americas – 1763.  Source: TranspacificProject.com

The Doctrine of Discovery is the Basis of International Law Today

In May 2009, the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues 2 conducted a study of the impact on indigenous peoples of the international legal construct known as the “Doctrine of Discovery,” which has served as the foundation of the violation of their human rights. ( See: UN Fact Sheet_Doctrine Discovery.) This study reports:

“This preliminary study establishes that the Doctrine of Discovery has been institutionalized in law and policy, on national and international levels, and lies at the root of the violations of indigenous peoples’ human rights, both individual and collective. This has resulted in State claims to and the mass appropriation of the lands, territories and resources of indigenous peoples.

Both the Doctrine of Discovery, and a holistic structure that we term the ‘Framework of Dominance’ have resulted in centuries of virtually unlimited resource extraction from the traditional territories of indigenous people. This, in turn, has resulted in the dispossession and impoverishment of indigenous peoples, and the host of problems that they face today on a daily basis.”

“We maintain, that the principle declared in the fifteenth century as the law of Christendom, that discovery gave title to assume sovereignty over, and to govern the unconverted natives of Africa, Asia, and North and South America, has been recognized as a part of the national law [Law of Nations], for nearly four centuries, and that it is now so recognized by every Christian power, in its political department and its judicial.”

Doctine of Discovery photo

CHART OF RACIAL INCARCERATION IN THE USA

Incarceration Chart

855-FF-chart.jpg. African American males are more likely than others to be stopped by police and incarcerated. www.familyfacts.org

Decolonizing our minds will make a difference in how we approach this future – whether with bombs and invasion, or with diplomacy and peace negotiations. It’s time to teach our kids the truth about the history of the Americas!

Teaching Materials:

Rethinking Schools: Rethinking Columbus — Expanded Second Edition!

The Howard Zinn Educational Project: Teaching a People’s History http://zinnedproject.org/about/howard-zinn/

References:

1 United Nations Permanent Forum for Indigenous People: http://unpfip.blogspot.ca/p/framework-of-dominance-preliminary_03.html. What is now called “international law” was previously known as the Law of Nations. In the late nineteenth century, for example, the international law scholar Thomas Erskine Holland referred to the law of nations as “the law of Christendom; as little applicable to infidels as was the ‘common law’ of the Greek cities … to societies of barbarians”. In 1835, Judge John Catron (1786-1865), while seated on the Supreme Court of the State of Tennessee (United States),(6) officially identified “a principle” as part of “the law of Christendom”, specifically, “that discovery gave title to assume sovereignty over, and to govern the unconverted [non-Christian] peoples of Africa, Asia, and North and South America”. Catron declared that this principle had been recognized as a part of the Law of Nations “for nearly four centuries, and that it is now so recognized by every Christian power, in its political department and its judicial.”

2 United Nations Permanent Forum for Indigenous People: http://unpfip.blogspot.ca/p/framework-of-dominance-preliminary_03.html

3 www.news.yahoo.com – Statistics Show White Supremacy Bigger Threat to the US Than Radical Muslims http://news.yahoo.com/statistics-show-white-supremacy-bigger-004327404.html

 

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Mexicans Go Home? A Video History of Immigration in the USA

By: Patricia Ann Talley, Editor.

Immigration is one of the key issues in the upcoming 2016 presidential race in the United States. To make an intelligent decision on this topic, one must understand the true history of immigration in America – a history that is not often taught.

Most of the world, and most USA citizens, think of America as a “land of immigrants. But, the fact is that America is “evolving” into a land of immigrants. Initially, by law, the United States only permitted “white immigrants” – Native Americans, Africans, and all others were excluded from its citizenship. Racial and nationality restrictions for immigration in America did not end until 1965, and the country still has a “failed” system for Latin and Asian immigrants.

Why is this important to know? Again, knowing the truth about history helps one to make intelligent decisions about the future. Next, the demographics of America are changing, and young immigrants and people of color will be needed to help support the retirement benefits of the country’s aging population. It is critical to the economy of the country that these young people participate in its future prosperity.

In 2012, the Public Broadcast System (PBS) produced a film about race and immigration in America. Here are some short videos that will explain this history to you.

1790 Naturalization Act – The First Immigration Law for “Whites Only”: Upon declaring independence from England, the leaders of the new nation wanted to create a distinct American nationality. The first immigration legislation was in 1790, which allowed individuals to apply for citizenship if they were a “free white person,” being of good character, and living in the United States for two years. This excluded Native Americans, white indentured servants, most white women, free and enslaved Africans, and all other non-white persons born on American soil.Elder women of the Shinnecock Nation by Andrew Brannan

Native Americans did not receive citizenship in the new nation. Photo: Elder women of the Shinnecock Nation by Andrew Brannan from www.vice.com

1868 – 14th (1868) and 15th Amendments (1869) to the Constitution: The 14th Amendment grants citizenship to all persons born or naturalized in the United States, but this did not include Native Americans, who did not receive citizenship until 1924. The 15th Amendment gave citizenship (voting rights) to African males living in the country, but this right was often denied until the Voting Rights Act of 1964.

1882 – The Chinese Exclusion Act: This was the first law to restrict immigration to the United States in any way. For ten years, this act kept Chinese people from immigrating to the United States and prohibited them from becoming citizens. It was passed as a response to growing anxieties over unemployment and declining wages, which many Americans attributed to the Chinese who came to build the railroads in the West.

chinese-railroad-workers-082312-04282011

1896 – US Supreme Court Sets “One Drop Rule” to Determine “Blackness”: The 1790 Naturalization Act opened immigration and citizenship to “whites” only, but allowed for importation of enslaved Africans. Following the Civil War to abolish slavery, the 15th Amendment in 1869 gave citizenship to African males living in the country, but the country implemented a strict system of racial segregation, which prevented blacks and people of color from participating in much of its social and economic growth. How do you determine race? In 1896, the Court ruled that race is determined by “one drop” of black blood. Racial segregation extended to all “non-whites.”

Racial Segragation

1919 – 19th Amendment Gives Citizenship/Vote to Women: Native American women did not receive this right until 1962; Black women and other women of color were often denied this right until the Voting Rights Act of 1964.

Womens Vote

1922 – Japanese Excluded in Ozawa vs. The United States: In 1914, Takao Ozawa, born in Kanagawa, Japan applied for U.S. citizenship after residing in the United States for twenty years. His petition to naturalize was denied since naturalization was limited to “free white persons,” “aliens of African nativity,” and “persons of African descent.” Ozawa argued that his skin was “lighter” than most, but the Supreme Court ruled that Ozawa as Japanese did not qualify as Caucasian and was ineligible for citizenship. He even showed the court his “white” underarms!

1923 -Indians Excluded in The United States vs. Bhagat Singh Thind: In 1923, Bhagat Singh Thind, a native of Punjab, India, applied for citizenship after he was honorably discharged from the U.S. army in 1918. A veteran, he was denied citizenship under the law which limited naturalization to “free whites” only. Despite the concession of the courts that Indians were to be considered Caucasians, they also stated that “the average man knows perfectly well that there are unmistakable and profound differences.”

1924 – The Johnson Reed “Quotas Act” Limits Immigration by Nationality: This act imposed a national origins quota that limited the annual number of immigrants allowed. Immigrants of any one nationality could not exceed 2% of the population of that nationality already residing in the U.S. according to the 1890 census, thus maintaining a majority white population. Asians were entirely excluded from the origins quota and were not allowed entry under any circumstances.

1924 – Congress Grants Citizenship to All Native Americans Born in the U.S.: Until 1924, Native Americans were not citizens of the United States. Many Native Americans had, and still have, separate nations within the U.S. on designated reservation land. In 1924, Congress granted citizenship to all Native Americans born in the U.S. and gave them the right to vote, but many states overtly did not allow Natives to vote until 1962.

1952 – McCarran-Walter Immigration Act Abolished Racial Restrictions: This act abolished racial restrictions found in United States immigration and naturalization statutes going back to the Naturalization Act of 1790, which had limited naturalization to immigrants who were “free white persons.” But, the act retained a quota system for nationalities and regions, and eventually established a preference system which determined which ethnic groups were “desirable” immigrants, placing great importance on labor qualifications.

1964 – The Civil Rights Act Outlaws Discrimination by Race: This act outlawed discrimination and segregation in public facilities, government, and employment based on race, color, religion, sex, or national origin. The act was an attempt to bring an end to the racial discrimination that influenced policy and limited the rights of citizens. Originally meant to protect the rights of black males, it was soon amended to include everyone in the United States, and set the basis for the Immigration Act of 1965.

1965 – Hart-Cellar Immigration Act Abolishes National Quotas in Immigration: This act changed American immigration policy by abolishing the national origins quota system that had been in structure since the 1920s, replacing it with a preference system that focused on immigrants’ skills and family relationships with citizens or residents of the U.S.

But, America created the system of undocumented immigrants from Asia and Latin America.

How does this affect the future? As recently as 1980, 80 percent of the United States was white, but results of the 2010 Census depict a rapidly changing nation. Demographics show an aging white population on the decline. By 2042, the US population will be made of less than 50% white people with people of other racial and ethnic groups in the majority. The Hispanic population is driving this change. These young workers will be needed to support the country’s economic system. This demographic change will have an impact on America’s future – particularly as it pertains to politics and leadership!

About the Author: Patricia Ann Talley, originally from Detroit, Michigan, has resided in Mexico for over 19 years where she consults in the area of economic development and the preservation of indigenous and African cultures.

References:

American Library of Congress: http://www.americaslibrary.gov/jb/jazz/jb_jazz_citizens_1.html

PBS Election Special: “Race in 2012” http://race2012pbs.org/the-film/description/

Indiana University Library: http://www.indiana.edu/~kdhist/H105-documents-web/week08/naturalization1790.html

Densho Organization Encyclopedia, Naturalization Act of 1790: http://encyclopedia.densho.org/Naturalization_Act_of_1790/

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Afromexican Vicente Guerrero – A Leader of Liberty, Independence and Peace!

By: Dr. Talia Weltman-Cisneros, North Texas University, Dallas, Texas, U.S.A.

Editor’s Note: Many people in the world don’t even know his name. Yet, Vicente Guerrero (1782-1831) should be revered throughout history as a leader of liberty, independence and peace. He was a general in Mexico’s war of independence, he helped write the nation’s constitution, and he abolished slavery during his presidential administration. Vicente Guerrero of Mexico was of mixed African descent and he, not Barack Obama, was North America’s first black president. The state of Guerrero, Mexico is named in his honor. Read more about this man of peace.

Celebrated as one of Mexico’s most important, national heroes, Vicente Guerrero played a significant role in the independence of the new nation and in the abolition of slavery of Mexico. In 1782, Vicente Ramón Guerrero Saldaña was born in Tixtla, a city northeast of Acapulco, in what is today his namesake state of Guerrero. Of mestizo origin, including African descent, Guerrero was born into a family that was dedicated to farming. As such, the young Guerrero similarly entered into the agricultural field, serving as a mule driver.

Vicente Guerrero - black

President Vicente Guerrero of Mexico (1782-1831) should be revered throughout the world as a leader of liberty, independence and peace. 

As an adult, Guerrero was attracted to the independence movement and joined the insurgency against Spanish colonial rule by working with his father as an assistant in a gunsmith’s shop. However, his celebrated military career truly advanced in 1810, after meeting with and impressing General José María Morelos, another mestizo of African descent, who commissioned Guerrero to join the Galeana family in attacking the Spanish troops in the South of Mexico. Upon his official insertion into the insurgency, Guerrero had numerous military successes, including at the battle of Izúcar in 1812, and in leading troops in Taxco, after which he would be appointed to the level of lieutenant colonel by Morelos.

Even as the insurgency declined in strength after the death of Morelos in 1815, Vicente Guerrero continued his role as a dedicated and valiant leader of the independence movement. With fewer resources and manpower, he used guerrilla warfare tactics to surge ahead, defeating Spanish battalions in several cities, thus able to re-arm and increase the insurgency again. As his military successes mounted, Guerrero transformed himself into a great threat to the Spaniards. As a result, the Spanish viceroy, Juan Ruiz de Apodaca, sent Guerrero’s own father to offer him amnesty and persuade the independence leader to give up his arms in exchange for money and the preservation of his military title. However, Guerrero responded with a famous decree that is now inscribed on a plaque dedicated to the hero at his home in Tixtla: “Independencia y libertad, o muerte. Primero está mi Patria que mi padre” (Independence and liberty, or death. My homeland comes first, before my father).

Vicente Guerrero’s valiance and dedication to his homeland further contributed to his leadership role in the independence movement. In January 1821, Guerrero was invited by Agustín de Iturbide, another Mexican independence hero, to discuss a plan for independence known as the Plan de Iguala (Plan of Iguala). The Plan de Iguala served as a constitutional roadmap in the transition of power from Spain to Mexico, fomenting the independence of the new nation in September 1821. In agreeing with the plan’s stipulations, Guerrero handed over control of his troops and was appointed as a general by Iturbide. Iturbide would become the first head-of-state of the new nation with the title of Constitutional Emperor of Mexico.

However, despite achieving independence, political turmoil plagued the new nation. Guerrero and Iturbide clashed due to Iturbide’s imperial designs for the new nation. Iturbide would eventually fall, and would be followed by Guadalupe Victoria, Mexico’s first president, from 1824 to 1829. Again, however, another internal, political rebellion arose, this time led by Nicolás Bravo against Victoria. With the help of Guerrero, Bravo’s rebellion was suppressed, yet a new presidency was in order.

In 1829 Vicente Guerrero’s political career reached its highpoint. With the citizen majority supporting him, Guerrero became the second president of Mexico from April to December of 1829. Although his presidency was short-lasting, it was filled with several important accomplishments. A Spanish attempt to reconquer Mexico was defeated. In addition, an expedition was commissioned to organize a group of Haitians in Cuba that would aid in an uprising against the Spaniards on that island.

Furthermore, perhaps the most poignant accomplishment of Guerrero’s presidency was the abolition of slavery in Mexico. Likely linked to his own mixed origins, Guerrero was steadfast in identifying himself not with a particular ethnicity or caste, but rather as “americano.”[i] His loyalty lay with his “patria,” his homeland, not with any particular segment of the Mexican nation. Thus, it was logical that Guerrero would officially enact what Miguel Hidalgo had originally decreed in 1810—the abolition of slavery in the new Republic. The Guerrero decree stipulated the specifics of this enactment:

The Guerrero Decree

The President of the United States of Mexico, know ye: That desiring to celebrate in the year of 1829 the anniversary of our independence with an act of justice and national beneficence, which might result in the benefit and support of a good, so highly to be appreciated, which might cement more and more the public tranquility, which might reinstate an unfortunate part of its inhabitants in the sacred rights which nature gave them, and which the nation protects by wise and just laws, in conformance with the 30th article of the constitutive act, in which the use of extraordinary powers are ceded to me, I have thought it proper to decree:

1st. Slavery is abolished in the republic.

2nd. Consequently, those who have been until now considered slaves are free.

3rd. When the circumstances of the treasury may permit, the owners of the slaves

will be indemnified in the mode that the laws may provide. And in order that

every part of this decree may be fully complied with, let it be printed,

published, and circulated.

Given at the Federal Palace of Mexico, the 15th of September, 1829. Vicente Guerrero To José María Bocanegra

Despite such momentous accomplishments and an illustrious military career, Vicente Guerrero’s presidency and life would come to an abrupt end. He left the presidency in December 1829 in order to fight a rebellion levied against him by his own vice president, Anastasio Bustamante. His absence resulted in him being declared unfit to govern the Republic. While continuing to combat the rebellion and hopefully return to power, the great independence fighter was captured through bribery and deceit, and he was eventually executed on February 14, 1831.

While several moments of his life were marred with conflict, the political and military career of Vicente Guerrero would be characterized as heroic. His legacy as a steadfast leader in the independence movement and his unsurpassed dedication to his homeland has been remembered and celebrated throughout the history of Mexico. His famous phrase, “Mi patria es primero” (My homeland comes first) is now the motto for the state of Guerrero, which is also named in his honor. And his most notable accomplishment, the abolition of slavery in the new Republic, has marked Vicente Guerrero as a great leader and freedom fighter for all humanity.

[i] Author’s Note: There are several definitions for what is identified as a continent depending on cultural and geographic regions. In Latin America and some European countries, the continents are America, Asia, Europe, Africa, Oceana and Antarctica. This is in contrast to the division of continents used in China and in numerous English speaking countries such as the United States, where America is divided into North and South America. Thus, Guerrero’s mention to being “americano” refers to being a citizen of the entire American continent (North and South).

Bibliography

“Vicente Guerrero.” Enciclopedia de México. Tomo VII. 1987.

“Vicente Guerrero (1782-1831).” Guerrero. Gobierno Del Estado. Gobierno Del Estado De Guerrero.

Web. http://guerrero.gob.mx/articulos/himno-a-vicente-guerrero/.

“Vicente Guerrero, 1782-1831.” Mexico 2010. Gobierno Federal De Mexico. Web.

Web: http://www.bicentenario.gob.mx/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=65:%20vicente-guerrero-1783-1831&catid=84:biografias-independencia

(Reprinted with permission from the author and from the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Taskforce, Southfield, MI, U.S.A., Pathways to Freedom in the Americas, www.FreedomPathways.org)

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Aydee Rodriguez from Costa Chica Mexico Presents Painting of Nelson Mandela to South Africa

In 2015, the South African Embassy in Mexico donated a painting of Nelson Mandela, which was created by Afro-Mexican artist Aydeé Rodríguez López from Cuajinicuilapa in the Costa Chica region of Guerrero, to the Senate of South Africa for permanent display. The painting depicts the image of the legendary Mandela, along with the cultural representation of ancestral African people who were brought to Mexico, especially in the Costa Chica region, known as the “Black Pearl of African Mexico”.

Nelson Mandela by Aydee Rodriquez

A painting of Nelson Mandela and the ancestral African peoples of Mexico hangs in the South African Senate. It was created by Afro-Mexican artist Aydeé Rodríguez López, from Cuajinicuilapa, Guerrero in the Costa Chica region.

The painting was initially presented by the artist to the South African ambassador to Mexico, Sandile Nogxina, at a ceremony at the Embassy of South Africa in Mexico City. Dr. Talia Weltman-Cisneros attended representing Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan. Dr. Weltman-Cisneros, originally from South Africa, is a researher and consultant in Afro-Mexican culture.

Ambassador Sandile Nogxina said that the artwork of the image of the leader Nelson Mandela should be a constant reminder of cultural ties between Africa and Mexico, a reminder of the contributions made by people of African descent in the construction of society, and that Mexico is a land of multiplicity of persons whose origins must be recognized.africa350

The artwork was initially presented to the Embassy of South Africa in Mexico City in July 2015, and then forwarded to the South African Senate.

The Afro-Mexican artist Aydeé Rodríguez López explained that her painting reflects the grandeur of the social work of Nelson Mandela, his love for humanity, his country, and his people. In addition, it reflects the map of South Africa and black culture that brought those ancient peoples to Cuajinicuilapa, Guerrero, Mexico, where the African culture still prevails today.

Afro Mexicans in Costa Chica

Pictured is a house, shaped like those found in an African village, that is located in the Costa Chica region of Guerrero. The area has one of the largest populations of Afro-Mexicans in the country. Photo courtesy of www.FreedomPathways.org.

Upon receiving the artwork, South African Senator Maria del Rocio Pineda Gochi said the Costa Chica region of Guerrero, is in itself a vast representation of African values and elements, where they have organized meetings between black African peoples to preserve the integrity of their communities.

There are no official figures on population census on the location and the number of people of African descent in Mexico. An effort is currently underway to recognize and count the population in the national census, which will facilitate public policies focused on this population to have greater impact and improve their quality of life.

For more information about Afro-Mexicans, visit: Pathways to Freedom in the Americas | Shared Experiences between Michigan, U.S.A and Guerrero, Mexico

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2016 Tax Deductions To The Income Tax On Capital Gains… And When Everything Fails.

By Agustín Galindo, Attorney-at-Law

As I wrote in another article, when you sell your property you have to consider in advance the amount of income tax to be paid on your gain. The tax rate as foreigner is either 25% without deductions, or 35% with deductions.

Capital Gains Tax Investment Property Vancouver-663-wide

Now, which are your deductions? In this regard, the Income Tax Law gives us a limited list of the applicable deductions for individuals obtaining an income for transferring property:

  • The updated cost of the property with the understanding, that in the case of properties, this cost will be at least 10% of the transfer price.
  • Investment in construction, improvements and extensions.
  • Notarial fees, taxes and rights for the deeds of acquisition, including the transfer tax and appraisal fees.

Please be aware that for these deductions to be applicable you need to have invoices that fulfill the requirements of the tax code; otherwise, your deduction will not be considered valid by the notary public formalizing the transaction, who is legally liable to estimate and withhold the taxes.

If you realize that you have no valid deductions for the case of constructions, you still have the following options:

  • To use as “cost of the construction” the one stated in the termination license of the construction. (When such license specifies the percentage of the value of the constructions, improvements and extensions of the property allocated to the land and construction, then the seller may only consider the value as “cost of the construction”).
  • If you have the termination license, but provides no values, then the tax law regulation still gives you the benefit of obtaining an appraisal which is referred to the date of the termination license and can be deducted only to an 80%. Technically this appraisal is known as a “referred appraisal value”.

When you sell your property, before accepting any offer, please take the time to carry out the following:

  1. Get your tax calculation.
  2. Check if you have valid deductions for the time you acquired your property or you built it.
  3. Check if you have your construction and termination licenses, with the understanding that you can still regularize them and be able to get a “referred appraisal value”.

This way when you sell your property you can have your tax calculation in advance, know your applicable deductions, and be able to legally reduce your taxes.

About the Author:

Agustin Galindo is a Mexican attorney with a Master of Law (LLM) from Southern Methodist University and taxation degrees from ITAM. You can contact him at galindoabogados@gmail.com and on his website at www.galindoabogados.com.

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“OPERATION WETBACK”: History’s Most Massive Deportation of Undocumented Immigrants from the USA

By: William H. Tucker*.

Recently, political candidates in the United States have discussed the possibility of repeating “Operation Wetback” to deport more than two million “undocumented” Mexicans. Many people do not remember this deportation program from history.

The most massive deportation of undocumented Mexicans in the history of the United States began in June, 1954 and was called “Operation Wetback.” “Wetback” was a term used for “illegal” Mexican immigrants who crossed the Rio Grande to get into the United States. We can only guess what motivated President Dwight D. Eisenhower to implement this plan because very little was written in his official papers about this operation. What we do know is as many as three (3) million illegal migrants had entered the U.S. for jobs in California, Arizona, and Texas before 1951, and that the number was growing by as much as a million per year. The border between Mexico and the United States was so porous it was almost non-existent and profits from illegal labor led to a kind of corruption that worried President Eisenhower. Let’s look back at the history.

Dwight Eisenhower

US President Dwight Eisenhower implemented “Operation Wetback,” the most massive deportation of aliens.

In 1949, the Border Patrol seized nearly 280,000 illegal immigrants and by 1953, that number had grown to more than 865,000. In 1951, before being elected president, Retired General Eisenhower wrote a letter to Sen. William Fulbright (Democrat) of Arkansas regarding the problem. The senator had just proposed that a special commission be created by Congress to examine unethical conduct by government officials who accepted gifts and favors in exchange for special treatment of private individuals. He quoted a report in The New York Times, highlighting one paragraph that said: “The rise in illegal border-crossing by Mexican ‘wetbacks’ to a current rate of more than 1,000,000 cases a year has been accompanied by a curious relaxation in ethical standards extending all the way from the farmer-exploiters of this contraband labor to the highest levels of the Federal Government.”

In 1953, Dwight D. Eisenhower was elected president of the United States and had a sense of urgency about illegal immigration when he took office. America “was faced with a breakdown in law enforcement on a very large scale,” said Attorney General Brownell. In 1954, President Eisenhower appointed retired General Joseph “Jumpin’ Joe” Swing, a former West Point classmate and veteran of the 101st Airborne, as the new INS Commissioner, and thus began what history now views as a quasi-military operation to find and seize illegal immigrants.

General Swing oversaw the Border Patrol, and organized state and local officials along with the police. The object of his intense border enforcement was “illegal aliens,” but common practice of “Operation Wetback” focused on Mexicans in general.

The police swarmed through Mexican-American communities throughout the southeastern states. Some residents, fearful of the potential violence of this militarization, fled back south across the border. In some cases, illegal immigrants were deported along with their American-born children, who were by law U.S. citizens.

The agents adopted the practice of stopping “Mexican-looking” American citizens on the street and asking for identification. This practice incited and angered many U.S. citizens who were of Mexican-American descent. Opponents in both the United States and Mexico complained of “police-state” methods.

Mexicans caught in the roundup were not simply released at the border where they could easily reenter the USA. To discourage their return, General Swing arranged for buses and trains to take many aliens deep within Mexico before setting them free. Tens of thousands more were put aboard two hired ships, the Emancipation and the Mercurio. The ships ferried the aliens from Port Isabel, Texas, to Veracruz, Mexico, more than 500 miles south.

Many people have no idea that immigration from non-European countries was restricted in the United States up until 1965, when the Hart-Cellar Immigration Act was passed that changed the focus to immigrants’ skills and family relationships with U.S. citizens. But, America created the system of undocumented immigrants from Asia and Latin America that still has not been addressed. Listen to the experts:

* Our co-founder and publisher William H. Tucker passed away on May 15, 2016. This is one of many articles that he researched and wrote, and for which he will be remembered.

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The Mexican Immigration Problem: How it Started, Part 2

The Mexican Immigration Problem: How it Started, Part 3 Final

Do You Know What Legal Documents Mexicans Need to Visit the USA or Canada?

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Peace Pals Art Contest Teaches Lessons of Peace – Listen to the Kids!

By: Patricia Ann Talley, Editor

Art and writing are universal ways for children to express themselves. Each year, children and youth (8 – 16 years) from around the world compete in the Peace Pals International Art Contest to win recognition and prices. A winner is selected from each country, and the collection of winning artwork is exhibited throughout the world. The competition for 2016 just ended on June 30th, and the judging is currently underway. This year’s theme is, “Oneness with Diversity.”

While the artwork is a joy for all of us to see, the true value of this contest is the underlying lessons in world peace and humanity that it teaches. An example of this is the entry from 7-year-old Donajĺ Sofĺa Hernández Mėndez from Niños Heroes elementary school in Zihuatanejo, Guerrero, Mexico, who showed me her artwork entry regarding diversity.   Donaji Sofia Hernandez Mendez

DONAJI SOFIA HERNÁNDEZ MÉNDEZ -MÉXICO

Artwork by: Donajĺ Sofĺa Hernández Mėndez from Niños Heroes elementary school in Zihuatanejo, Guerrero, Mexico. “May Peace Prevail on Earth” is written in Spanish and the native Náhuatl language.

She explains the meaning of her art creation:

“My painting is about caring for nature – to have no more trash, for children with disabilities to have help, to protect our beaches, and to give help to anyone who needs it. No more bullying in schools. This will make it good on earth and we will have peace in the world.

My painting says, ‘May Peace Prevail on Earth,’ in Spanish and Náhuatl.”

If we create a generation of children with these values and principles, we are all winners!

Congratulations to all of the children who participated in this contest, and to the teachers, parents, and loved ones who supported and helped them with these lessons of peace.

Winners of the competition will be announced in the fall. The collection of winning artwork will then be available for international tours and exhibition. The Peace Pals Art Exhibition will be on display at the Art Institute in San Miguel de Allende, Guanajuato, Mexico in October 2017.

Peace Pals Art Exhibit in Mexico2

The Peace Pals International Art Exhibition was in Mexico for the first time in 2015 at the museum in Zihuatanejo, Guerrero and at local resort hotels. The next exhibition in Mexico will be in October 2017 in San Miguel de Allende, Guanajuato.

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Children & Young Adults Invited to Participate in International Art and Essay Contests

By:  Patricia Ann Talley, MBA and Editor.

Art and writing are universal ways for children to express themselves. And now, the children and young adults in your community have the opportunity to participate in international contests to win recognition and prizes!

Peace Pals International 2016 Art Contest – Open Until June 30!

Children and youth (8 – 16 years) from around the world are invited to submit their artwork to the 19th Annual Peace Pals International Art Exhibition and Awards. The theme for 2016 is “Oneness with Diversity.”

peacepals_header_2016_smallbox

This year, the competition is partnering with the Fuji Declaration – a group of people from around the world who promise to make a commitment to a flourishing world through love and understanding that all living beings are important, creating peace on earth, creativity, and help your community members.

We invite parents, adult community members, or teachers to visit The Fuji Declaration and learn about this very special global project. Adults are asked to explain it in ways the young person will understand. For more information, visit: http://www.fujideclaration.org.

Then after the peace lesson, children and youth are invited to draw and paint their artwork to express their visions of a world that is filled with everlasting peace.

Register: Please read the rules and follow all directions. You must register to participate. Please visit: http://wppspeacepals.org/registration/

ONE ENTRY PER CHILD – FOUR AGE CATEGORIES

  • Age Category One: Age 5 – 7
  • Age Category Two: Age 8 – 10
  • Age Category Three: Age 11 – 13
  • Age Category Four: Age 14 – 16

PRIZES TO BE AWARDED

  • First Place Winners ~ Classic White Peace Pole
  • Second Place Winners ~ 17” Desktop Peace Pole
  • Third Place Winners ~ 8” Desktop Peace Pole
  • Finalists ~ Certificates and Assorted Prizes

The winning art pieces are duplicated and sent around the world for display. In 2015, the Peace Pals International Art Tour came to Mexico for the first time and was on display in Ixtapa Zihuatanejo, Guerrero. The 20th Anniversary Tour of the exhibit in Mexico will take place in San Miguel de Allende, Guanajuato in October 2017.Peace Pals Art Exhibit in Mexico2

The Peace Pals International Art Tour debuted in Mexico in Zihuatanejo in 2015. The next tour in Mexico will be in October 2017 in San Miguel de Allende, Guanajuato.

2016 International Essay Contest for Young People – Open Until June 15!

This annual competition is organized by the Goi Peace Foundation in Tokyo, Japan and is an activity of the UNESCO Global Action Programme (GAP) on Education for Sustainable Development (ESD).

This annual essay contest is organized in an effort to harness the energy, imagination and initiative of the world’s youth in promoting a culture of peace and sustainable development. It also aims to inspire society to learn from the young minds and to think about how each of us can make a difference in the world.

2016EssayTitleEN

For 2016, the theme is, “Education to Build a Better Future for All.” We live in a world with many complex problems, both local and global. What kind of education and learning would help us address these challenges and create a sustainable world and a better life for all?

Describe your concrete ideas for an ideal education. Entries may be submitted by postal mail or online. Teachers and youth directors may submit a collection of essays from their class or group.

GUIDELINES:

  1. Essays may be submitted by anyone up to 25 years old (as of June 15, 2016) in one of the following age categories:
    1. Children (ages up to 14)
    2. Youth (ages 15 – 25)
  2. Essays must be 700 words or less in English, French, Spanish or German, or 1600 characters or less in Japanese, excluding essay title. Essays may be typed or printed.

DEADLINE:  Entries must be received by June 15, 2016 (23:59 your local time).

AWARD: The following awards will be given in the Children’s category and Youth category respectively:

  • 1st Prize: Certificate and prize of 100,000 Yen (approx. US$880 as of February 2016) … 1 entrant
  • 2nd Prize: Certificate and prize of 50,000 Yen (approx. US$440 as of February 2016)… 2 entrants
  • 3rd Prize: Certificate and gift          …5 entrants
  • Honorable Mention: Certificate and gift … 25 entrants

The 1st prize winners will be invited to the award ceremony in Tokyo, Japan scheduled for November 2016 and will receive the Minister of Education Award. (Travel expenses will be covered by the organizer.)

Go on line, learn more, and submit your essay! http://www.goipeace-essaycontest.org/

You can do it!

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US Expats – Your Votes Count!

A Message from the United States Embassy in Mexico City:

Your vote counts!  Did you know that many U.S. elections for House and Senate seats have been decided by a margin smaller than the number of ballots cast by absentee voters? All states are required to count every absentee ballot as long as it is valid and reaches local election officials by the absentee ballot receipt deadline.

state-dept-logo

Follow a few simple steps to make sure that you can vote in the 2016 U.S. elections:

  1. Request Your Ballot: Complete a new Federal Post Card Application (FPCA).  You must complete a new FPCA to ensure you receive your ballot for the 2016 elections. The completion of the FPCA allows you to request absentee ballots for all elections for federal offices (President, U.S. Senate, and U.S. House of Representatives) including primaries and special elections during the calendar year in which it is submitted. The FPCA is accepted by all local election officials in all U.S. states and territories.

You can complete the FPCA online at FVAP.gov. The online voting assistant will ask you questions specific to your state. We encourage you to ask your local election officials to deliver your blank ballots to you electronically (by email, internet download, or fax, depending on your state). Include your email address on your FPCA to take advantage of the electronic ballot delivery option. Return the FPCA per the instructions on the website. FVAP.gov will tell you if your state allows the FPCA to be returned electronically or if you must submit a paper copy with original signature. If you must return a paper version, please see below for mailing options.

  1. Receive and Complete Your Ballot:States are required to send out ballots 45 days before a regular election for federal office and states generally send out ballots at least 30 days before primary elections. For most states, you can confirm your registration and ballot delivery online.
  2. Return Your Completed Ballot: Some states allow you to return your completed ballot electronically and others do not.If your state requires you to return paper voting forms or ballots to local election officials, you can do so free of charge at the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate. Place your ballots in postage paid return envelopes or in envelopes bearing sufficient domestic U.S. postage, and address them to the relevant local election officials.

Forms and ballots may be submitted at the U.S. Embassy in Mexico City Monday- Friday from 8:00am until 3:00pm.

The U.S. Embassy in Mexico City is located at:

305 Paseo de la Reforma,

Colonia Cuauhtemoc,

06500, Mexico D.F.

Alternatively, envelopes may be dropped off at your closest Consular Agency.

The Consular Agency in Acapulco is located at:

Hotel Continental Emporio

Av. Costera Miguel Aleman 121,

Local 14

Acapulco, Guerrero, C.P. 39670

Forms and ballots may be submitted in Acapulco Monday- Friday, between 9:00am-1:00pm.

The Consular Agency in Oaxaca is located at:

Macedonio Alcala No. 407, Interior 20

C.P. 6800, Oaxaca, Oaxaca

Forms and ballots may be submitted in Oaxaca Monday- Thursday, between 10:00am-2:00pm.

The Consular Agency in San Miguel de Allende is located at:

Plaza la Luciernaga, Libramiento

Jose Manuel Zavala No. 65, Loc 4 y 5

Colonia la Luciernaga

C/P/ 37745, San Miguel de Allende, Guanajuato

Forms and ballots may be submitted in San Miguel de Allende Monday-Thursday, between 9:00am-12:00pm.

If it’s more convenient for you, you can also return your FPCA or ballot to your local election officials via international mail or professional courier service at your own expense.

Researching the Candidates and Issues: Online Resources. Check out the FVAP links page for helpful resources that will aid your research of candidates and issues. Non-partisan information about candidates, their voting records, and their positions on issues are widely available and easy to obtain on-line. You can also read national and hometown newspapers on-line, or search the internet to locate articles and information. For information about election dates and deadlines, subscribe to FVAP’s Voting Alerts (vote@fvap.gov).  FVAP also shares Voting Alerts via Facebookand Twitter.

Learn more at the Federal Voting Assistance Program’s (FVAP) website, FVAP.govIf you have any questions about registering to vote overseas, please contact Mexico City’s Voting Assistance Officer at (52) 55-5080-2000X or at votemexicocity@state.gov.

Remember, your vote counts!

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Capital Gains On Real Estate and Requirements for Tax Exemptions in Mexico (2016)

By: Agustin Galindo

Capital gain on real estate transfers is currently regulated in Mexico by the Income Tax Law and its Regulations, and provides for a tax rate for income taxes of up to 35% over the gain, less deductibles.

Also, the Tax Law and its Regulations provides for an option to calculate the taxation on a 25% basis over the price of the deal, which is not really an option.

Propoerty Tax

A tax exemption at the time of transferring a dwelling home is provided by the Tax Law in its article 93 fraction XIX, which considers the transfer of a dwelling home an exempted income, whenever the following conditions are met:

  • That the property is the dwelling home and this is proved by documents such as: Voting card (IFE, currently, INE card), telephone and electric bills and bank statements.
  • That the contributor has not sold another dwelling home in three consecutive years.
  • The exemption has a ceiling of 700,000 UDIS (Investment Units), which are updated every day. For example, last March 16, 2016, were up to $5.409 pesos per UDI, being it a limit of $3,786,300.00 pesos, approximately 210,350 dollars, at a rate of exchange of $18 pesos per dollar.

The exceeding of this limit is taxed over the gain, and deductions can be applied proportionally by dividing the exceeding by the price obtained.

This tax exemption is applicable only to tax residents in Mexico. If you are a foreigner, you are entitled to this benefit as a “Tax Resident”, with the understanding that tax authorities grant some benefits through certain tax criteria (Miscelanea Fiscal) that allows foreigners to be tax exempted when they met the status of “Tax Residents”.

To achieve such status, you have to show proof of the following:

  • That you are registered before the tax authority and have a tax id number (in Mexico, called the registro federal de contribuyentes, R.F.C. for its acronyms in Spanish).
  • That you have filed your last tax annual report and you are currently filing taxes in Mexico.
  • That the property that you are transferring is different from your tax address in Mexico.

If you fulfill with these requirements, then the authority may issue a statement as a “Tax Resident” so you can provide it to the notary public who will formalize the transfer of your property, allowing you to enjoy the tax exemption.

Please do not get confused with your immigration status, either temporary or permanent resident. In order to become a “Tax Resident” you need to show proof that you are legally in Mexico, but bear in mind that these are two different matters; what counts here is to show that you are a “Tax Resident” in order to become tax exempted.

If you are selling your dwelling home in Mexico, you are legally in Mexico and paying taxes in Mexico, please look for professional assistance so you can be tax exempted.

About the Author:

Agustin Galindo is the director of Galindo Abogados, www.galindoabogados.com and you can contact him at galindoabogados@gmail.com.

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Join the World Peace Youth Live Global Webcast on April 30, 2016!

From the World Peace Youth Organization of peace educators around the world:

As peace educators and proponents of peace, we have noticed throughout the years a need which has been missing for our youth and our world – a needed space where young peace ambassadors can have a voice without adult intervention or moderation.

Why is this so important? For decades young people have been instructed to…”be seen and not heard.” This is not an unfamiliar saying used by parents and educators in many situations throughout the years and the time has come for a great change to happen. Youth must be heard and we are the proponents for change.

World Peace Youth believes the time has come where we provide a platform for our young people to have their insightful wisdom and thoughts on world issues heard without the moderation of adults and not as members of the audience, but where they are the panelist and we adults are the audience.

World Peace Youth Conference

As World Peace Youth grows in the community of young people, we hope to accomplish great things. A place where young people can share their projects and their dreams of a world filled with peace. A meeting place where young people from around the globe can share ideas and network with one another. A place where we, the adults, can learn from these inspiring young people.

The time has come. We must remember, the youth of today are not only our future, but our present.

On April 30, 2016, World Peace Youth is launching a global initiative by hosting their first Live Video Webcast. Youth panelists from around the world will discuss The Fuji Declaration and share their views of world peace and how they are making a viable difference in the world today.

The Fuji Declaration is an invitation to people from all nations and walks of life to join in a commonality of purpose beyond borders. And most of all, The Fuji Declaration is a call to consciously evolve with each other and with nature to bring that new world into being. Click to download a copy and learn more about it: Fuji Declaration.

World Peace Youth Conference1

Join us on April 30th for this live video webcast with youth panelist from around the world who will discuss The Fuji Declaration and share their views of world peace and how they are making a viable difference. Listen to the voice of youth as they meet to highlight the theme of Oneness and Diversity for a better world.

Oneness in Diversity

Imagine witnessing history in the making.  Join in live video discussions with youth from around the world who are sure to be our future world peace leaders. Hear their ideas on how to make the world a more peaceful place for all of us. These young Ambassadors of Peace are not only our future – They are our present.

REGISTER: http://worldpeaceyouth.org/registration/

Times in Mexico, Canada, and The United States:

DATE: April 30, 2016:

  • 08:00 a.m. Central Daylight Time (CDT) – in Guerrero and Guanajuato, Mexico
  • 09:00 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time (EDT)
  • 07:00 a.m. Mountain Daylight Time (MDT)
  • 06:00 a.m. Pacific Daylight Time (PDT)

When you are ready to join, please click the link below to join the webinar.

https://zoom.us/j/315335696

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Acapulco, St. Louis, Detroit, and Baltimore among 50 Most Dangerous Cities in the World!

By:  Patricia Ann Talley, MBA and Editor

The United States government frequently issues warnings to its citizens traveling in Mexico, but its own cities of St. Louis, Missouri; Detroit, Michigan; and Baltimore, Maryland are included in the new list of the 50 Most Dangerous Cities in the World.

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Semáforo , Mexico’s Citizens’ Council for Public Safety and Criminal Justice recently published its report of the 50 most violent cities in the world. One-third of global homicides occur in Latin America, even though the region has just 8% of the world’s population. According to the UN, drug trafficking, gang wars, political instability, corruption, and poverty contribute to the region’s elevated violence.

Many people who have images of violence and murder in Mexico may be surprised to learn that while 8 of the 50 most violent cities in the world are located in Mexico, 4 cities on the most violent list are located in the United States!

World's Most Dangerous Cities 2015

Source: Semáforo, Mexico’s Citizens’ Council for Public Safety and Criminal Justice

Acapulco, Guerrero, Mexico ranks third on the list – but, St. Louis, Detroit, and New Orleans have higher homicide rates than other Mexican cities for which US travel warnings are in effect. Baltimore, Maryland is also included among the most dangerous. No cities in Canada are included.

Violence in Guerrero, Mexico? Again – Keep Things in Perspective!

The state of Guerrero, Mexico received international attention in 2014, when 43 college students were kidnapped and murdered, adding to the perception of “violence in Mexico.” But again, this violence should be kept in perspective, as compared to other areas of the world.

There were a total of 532 cases of homicide in the entire state of Guerrero in 2015, representing 12 percent of all homicides in Mexico. The state has a total of 3,546,710 inhabitants. In comparison to the chart above, the state had 15.2 homicides for every 100,000 residents.

Acapulco is the only city in the state of Guerrero that is included in the top 50 most dangerous. Acapulco accounted for 41% of the total homicides in Guerrero with 216 cases with a homicide rate of 104.06 per 100,000 residents. The cities of Chilpancingo had 67 homicides in 2015, Iguala 31, and Chilapa 30. Cities with the least homicides in the state include Coyuca de Benitz 20, Ometepec 14, and Ixtapa Zihuatanejo 13.

With 13 homicides in 2015, the homicide rate for Ixtapa Zihuatanejo is 10.83 per 100,000 residents. Compare these statistics to the homicide rates in USA cities like St. Louis with a rate of 49.93, Detroit at 44.87, New Orleans at 39.61, and Baltimore at 33.92. Compare these statistics to your city!

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How Happy is the World? 2015 World Happiness Report Might Surprise You!

The World Happiness Report for 2015 was recently published. It is a landmark survey of the state of global happiness. How happy is the world?

World Happiness Image

This Report, by the Sustainable Development Solutions Network contains analysis from leading experts in the fields of economics, neuroscience, national statistics, and ranks the happiness of nations.

“As the science of happiness advances, we are getting to the heart of what factors define quality of life for citizens,” said Professor John F. Helliwell, who was an editor of the Report from the University of British Columbia and the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research.

Other distinguished editors of the Report were: Lord Richard Layard, Director of the Well-Being Programme at LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance; and Professor Jeffrey D. Sachs, Director of the Earth Institute at Columbia University, Director of the SDSN, and Special Advisor to UN Secretary General Ban ki-Moon.

“We are encouraged that more and more governments around the world are listening and responding with policies that put well-being first. Countries with strong social and institutional capital not only support greater well-being, but are more resilient to social and economic crises,” said Helliwell. There is a new worldwide demand for more attention to happiness as criteria for government policy.

World Happiness Report 2

As previous reports have done, the World Happiness Report 2015 reveals trends in the data judging just how happy countries really are. On a scale running from 0 to 10, people in over 150 countries, surveyed by Gallup over the period 2012-15, reveal an average score of 5.1 (out of 10). Six key variables explain three-quarters of the variation in annual national average scores over time and among countries:

  1. Real GDP per capita
  2. Healthy life expectancy
  3. Having someone to count on
  4. Perceived freedom to make life choices
  5. Freedom from corruption
  6. Generosity

This year ,for the first time ever, the report breaks down the data by gender, age, and region. It finds striking differences, some much larger than have previously been found.

Which countries are happiest? The results might surprise you! According to the criteria of this report, Mexico ranks higher in happiness than the United States.

Happiest Countries in the World

Residents were asked to score their quality of life on a scale from 0-10.

1 Switzerland 7.587
2 Iceland 7.561
3 Denmark 7.527
4 Norway 7.522
5 Canada 7.427
6 Finland 7.406
7 Netherlands 7.378
8 Sweden 7.364
9 New Zealand 7.286
10 Australia 7.284
11 Israel 7.278
12 Costa Rica 7.226
13 Austria 7.200
14 Mexico 7.187
15 United States 7.119
16 Brazil 6.983
17 Luxembourg 6.946
18 Ireland 6.940
19 Belgium 6.937
20 United Arab Emirates 6.901
21 United Kingdom 6.867
22 Oman 6.853
23 Venezuela 6.810
24 Singapore 6.798
25 Panama 6.786
26 Germany 6.750

Source: World Happiness Report 2015

Click to download a free copy: World Happiness Report 2015. For more information, please email happiness@unsdsn.org.

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What’s in a Name? The Difference Between Spanish and English Names

By: Patricia Ann Talley (Wall de Tucker), Editor.

My Spanish word of the day is “Apellido.” You will find it on your immigration/declaration form if you fly to/from Mexico. Apellido is a masuline noun meaning “surname” or “family name.” Apellido de soltera indicates “maiden name.”

It is customary in the English-speaking world for men and women to use the last name (or family name/surname) of their father. For African-Americans, the family/surname came from the male owner of the plantation where their ancestors were enslaved – like (George) Washington or (Thomas) Jefferson. In the English world, married women customarily change their last name to their husband’s family name, or sometime use a hyphenated name, combining both their father’s and husband’s last names.

English Names

But, names are different in the Spanish-speaking world! In Mexico, and other Spanish-speaking countries, people commonly use the last names of both their father and their mother (in that order). When a woman marries, she usually keeps her full maiden name, rather than adopting her husband’s last name; or, she uses “de” (of) to add-on his family name. Mexicans also use academic titles in front of their names.

Spanish Names

Pedro García Fernández is typically addressed as Señor Garcia, or if he is a college graduate, he is addressed as Lic. Garcia. His wife will retain her maiden name of María Piñedo Saavedra that is a combination of her father’s and mother’s family names. If she has an academic title such as a teacher, she is addressed as Maestra Piñedo Saavedra.

Pedro García Fernández and María Piñedo Saavedra have a daughter called Eva. She is known as Eva García Piñedo. This custom is followed in all official documents, though in everyday use many people use only their first surname. So, if Eva García Piñedo married Carlos Hernández Río, she could either keep her own name intact, or be known as Señora de Hernández Río. In Latin America she might also be known as Eva García Piñedo de Hernández.

Warning to Ladies! In today’s global world, it is best not to change your name – add on if you like, but maintain your original family name! 

I learned this lesson about the difference in names in different parts of the world the hard way! It was a problem for me when I moved from the United States to Mexico, married, and then wanted to work as a marketing and language professor. Well, that required a trip to the Mexican immigration office to obtain a residency visa AND a professional work permit.

Mexican forms and documents ask for your name(s), indicating first and middle name; your father’s last name; and your mother’s last name. And, for my professional work permit, I need to show my academic degrees and university transcripts.

Line 1 of the Mexican application form read:

Nombre(s)

(Names)

Apellido de Padre

(Father’s Surname)

Apellido de Madre

(Mother’s Maiden Name)

Patricia Ann Talley Wall

Well. . .My English maiden name is Patricia Ann Talley“Ann” is my middle name and “Talley” is the surname/last name of my father. My mother’s maiden name is Barbara Wall. When I married William Tucker, I changed the name on my USA passport to Patricia Ann Tucker. My academic degrees are in the names of Patricia Ann Talley and my former married name of Patricia Ann Fisher. None of these names matched the format of the application.

So, to eliminate confusion, and to conform to the Spanish tradition, I returned to the USA to change my passport BACK to my maiden name, AND took a trip to my former universities to change my academic name BACK to my maiden name. I also changed my USA driver’s license to a hyphenated name. This took a lot of time and expense!

I lecture to girls and young women about their futures in a global society. The first lesson is DO NOT CHANGE YOUR NAME! You may not anticipate the customs of other countries.

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Por Los Niños of Zihuatanejo Charity Receives Rotary International Grant for Education

Club Rotario (Rotary) of Zihuatanejo recently received the largest grant in its 30+ year history to provide “basic access to education” for schools built by local charity Por los Niños (for the children) Educational Charity. The grant of $44,250 usd (about $700,000+ pesos) will provide furnishings, lights and fans, fixtures for new classrooms built by Por Los Niños, and will provide language classes for teachers and students in the area.Rotary International Logo

Por Los Niños de Zihuatanejo, AC is a Mexican non-profit, public-benefit corporation established for the administration and distribution of the funds raised by Zihuatanejo’s annual Sailfest activities. Each year, boaters from around the world sail into Zihuatanejo to provide rides and to enjoy activities that raise funds for education. These funds are then used by Por Los Niños to provide enhanced educational opportunities for the economically-disadvantaged children of Zihuatanejo.

Since 2002, the volunteers of Por Los Niños educational charity have donated, raised funds, and built more than ninety classrooms, bathrooms, kitchens, and playgrounds for disadvantaged children in the Zihuatanejo area. Nearly five thousand young students have benefited from their efforts. The charity’s vision is to provide an educational opportunity for each and every child in Zihuatanejo, regardless of income level or social status.

The Old School

This is a photo of an old classroom at 3 de Diciembre school in Barrio Nuevo, on the outskirts of Zihuatanejo.

Gracias to Austin Brown

Photo of new classroom at 3 de Diciembre school built by funds raised and donated by Por Los Niños.

So special, is that the some of these new school facilities that will be furnished were built with $21,000 usd raised and donated by a little eleven-year-old boy, Austin Brown, who is in the sixth grade at Providence Christian Academy in Springdale, Arkansas, USA. Austin raised the money by making packages of “fun sand” (like Play-Doh®) and artificial snow and selling them at carnivals and outlets.

Austin and his friends

Austin Brown (blue shirt) is eleven years old from the Providence Christian Academy in Springdale, Arkansas, USA. He raised $21,000 usd to build new classrooms. Now, the Rotary grant will furnish them.

Now, the Rotary International Humanitarian Grant of $44,250 usd (about $700,000+ pesos) will provide complete furnishings for three new classrooms, lights and fans, fixtures for the new bathrooms, glass in all the school windows, and a fully-equipped, air-conditioned computer room for the Centenario de la Revolución school in La Joya. The 3 de Diciembre school in Barrio Nuevo, will receive classroom furnishings, lights and fans, and kitchen equipment.

A second component of the Rotary grant addresses “adult literacy”. Por Los Niños will establish English classes for 45 to 60 teachers in the area, and Hospitality English classes for the students’ parents to promote enhanced employment opportunities.

Long-time Sailfest volunteer and California Rotarian, Carl McDaniel made it all happen, working for two years on the grant application along with Lorenzo Marburt, who is the local administrator of the Por Los Niños Foundation. Por Los Niños is named as a “cooperating organization” for the Rotary grant, and will handle all the day-to-day chores such as purchasing and contracting. Club Rotario (Rotary) of Zihuatanejo will administer the grant funds.

The community is grateful to all the efforts of so many people to help the young scholars of Zihuatanejo. And now, these efforts have been recognized and supported by such a respectable organization as Rotary International.

That should put a smile on everyone’s face!

Kids at PLN schools

Related Articles:

Por Los Niños of Zihuatanejo Educational Charity Builds Classrooms, Bathrooms, and Kitchens for Students

Greatness Can Come in a Small Package—A Ten-Year-Old Boy Raises $21,000 USD to Build a School in Zihuatanejo

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The 10 Commandments for Touring the World

10-commandmentsSubmitted by Sandy Thompson:  A reprint that I’ve seen many times before, I thought this would be a good reminder for all of us as we participate in the international events planned for this month.

#1.  Thou shalt not expect to find things as thou hast left them at home, for thou hast left thy home to find things different.

#2.  Thou shalt not take anything too seriously, for a carefree mind is vital to a good vacation.

#3.  Thou shalt not let the other tourist get on thy nerves, for thou art paying good money to have a good time.

#4.  Remember to keepeth thy passport in a safe place so that thou knowest where it is at all times, for a man without a passport is a man without a country. Carryeth on your person an official ID always.

#5.  Blessed is the person who can say “please” and “thank you” in any language, for this and a smile doubles the value of any tip.

#6.  Thou shalt not forget thou are a representative of your country at all times.

#7.  Thou shalt not worry, he that worrieth hath no pleasure, and few things are fatal.

#8.  Thou shalt not judge the people of a country by one person with whom thou hast trouble.

#9.  Thou shalt, when in Rome, do somewhat as the Romans do; if in difficulty, thou shalt use thy good common sense and friendliness.

#10.  Remember thou art a guest in every land, and he that treateth his host with respect shall be treated as an honored guest.

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Conflicts Over Slavery Cause the Texas Revolution and Lead to the Mexican American War

By:  Lynne Scully, Master of Labor Industrial Relations, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, U.S.A.

Editor’s Note: This article is from the website Pathways to Freedom in the Americas | Shared Experiences between Michigan, U.S.A and Guerrero, Mexico. This website accompanies a traveling exhibition that has been on tour in Michigan, USA since 2011. The project was funded by the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Task Force and the Michigan Humanities Council, and is re-published with permission.

When Mexico achieved its independence from Spain in 1821, and later when slavery was abolished in Mexico in 1829, the country then included most of the viceroyalty of New Spain, minus the Caribbean and the Philippines. Mexico stretched from California and the present-day U.S. Southwest and encompassed all of Central America except Panama. The state of “Coahuila y Tejas” (now Texas) was included in the new nation of Mexico. The area known as Central America split from Mexico in 1823 as a result of the fall of the empire of Agustín de Iturbide, however, Mexico did keep the southern state of Chiapas. After Mexico gained its independence from Spain, it legalized immigration from the United States.

Map of Mexico before the Conflict with the United States

Map of Mexico before US conflict

Call Number: G4410 1826.T3 G&M, Geography and Map Division, U. S. Library of Congress

Anglos from the United States sought and gained permission to settle in the Mexican state of “Coahuila y Tejas” (later known as Texas). Moses Austin was the first American immigrant to gain permission to settle in the state. His son, Stephen F. Austin brought 300 immigrants from the United States beginning in early 1822. Most of the immigrants came from the American south, and they brought their African slaves with them. Under Austin’s plan, each American immigrant was allowed to purchase an additional 50 acres of land for each slave he brought to the territory. At least 20,000 Anglos and their slaves eventually settled in the state. By 1825, one out of five American immigrants in “Texas” was an African slave.

At the same time, however, Mexico offered full citizenship to free blacks, including land ownership and other privileges. In 1823, Mexico forbade the sale or purchase of slaves, and required the children of slaves to be freed when they reached the age of fourteen. In 1827, the legislature of Coahuila y Tejas (now Texas) outlawed the introduction of additional slaves and granted freedom at birth to all children born to a slave.2

As the number of Anglo-Americans immigrants in Mexico increased, Mexican authorities began to fear the United States would want to annex Texas.  On April 6, 1830, the Mexican government passed a series of laws restricting immigration from the United States into Texas. The laws also canceled all unfilled business contracts and established customs houses in Texas to enforce the collection of customs duties.

Just two and a half months after Mexico abolished slavery in 1829, Tejas (Texas) Governor J.M. Viesca secured an exemption for his state. The land fees generated by the slavery of African-Americans had become an important source of income for the local government.

During this period of extremely tense relations between the two governments, Mexico consistently repudiated and forbade the institution of slavery in its territory, while U.S. slave-owners, who were immigrants in the Mexican state of Coahuila y Tejas (Texas), continuously sought ways to circumvent Mexican law.4

The abolition of slavery created tensions between the Mexican government and slave-holding immigrants from the United States.  These tensions came to a head in the Anahuac Disturbances. The Anahuac Disturbances were uprisings of American immigrants in and around Anahuac in 1832 and 1835 which helped to precipitate the Texas Revolution in 1836. In that year, American immigrants in Texas declared its independence from Mexico that eventually led to the United States invasion of Mexico in 1846.

After the loss of Texas, Mexican officials refused to formally acknowledge the Texas independence on the grounds that it “would be equivalent to the sanction and recognition of slavery.” After Texas independence the slave population mushroomed and the number of runaways across the South-Texas–North-Mexico border, increased. The slave institution in Texas was continuously undermined by defiant Tejanos (Mexicans in Texas) who took great risks and invested enormous resources toward facilitating the escape of enslaved Africans.5

After the Republic of Texas was created in 1836, Anglo-American views on slavery and race began to predominate and free blacks lost their rights as citizens.6 The 1836 Constitution of the Republic of Texas required free blacks to petition the Texas Congress for permission to continue living in the country. The following year all those who had been living in Texas at the time of independence were allowed to remain. On the other hand, the legislature created political segregation; it classified free residents with at least one-eight African heritage (equivalent to one great grandparent) as a separate category, and abrogated their citizen’s rights, prohibiting them from voting, owning property, testifying against whites in court, or intermarrying with whites.7 As planters increased cotton production, they rapidly increased the purchase and transport of slaves. By 1840, there were 11,323 slaves in Texas.8

Texas independence from Mexico eventually led to the United States invasion of Mexico in 1846. Called the “Insurgency from the North” in Mexico and the “Mexican American War” in the United States, this conflict would result in the United States forcibly taking the Mexican states of Texas, California, Arizona, New Mexico, Nevada, Utah and parts of Colorado.

Map of Mexico Today

Map of Mexico today

References:

  1.  Schwartz, Rosalie (1975) Across the Rio to Freedom, Texas Western Press, ISBN-10: 0874041023
  2. Barr, Alwyn (1996) Black Texas: A History of African Americans in Texas, University of Oakland Press, ISBN 0-806612878X, p.14
  3. Henson, Margaret Swett (1982), Juan Davis Bradburn: A Reappraisal of the Mexican Commander of Anahuac, College Station, TX: Texas A & M University Press, ISBN 978-0-89096-135-3, p.47
  4. Wilkins, Ron “Mexico Welcomed Fugitive Slaves and African American Job Seekers: New Perspectives on the immigration debate.”
  5. ^Barr, (1996) p.32
  6. ^Barr, (1996) p.6
  7. ^Barr, (1996), p.8
  8. ^Barr, (1996), p.17

Related Articles:

A Short History of September 16 – Independence Day in Mexico

Afromexican Vicente Guerrero Helps Lead the Revolution, Writes the Constitution and Becomes President!

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Zihuatanejo Honors Vicente Guerrero – Mexico’s Man of Peace and Dignity for All!

By: Patricia Ann Talley, Editor.

This year, the Norwegian Nobel Committee, based in Oslo Norway will present the Nobel Peace Prize to United States President Barack Hussain Obama for the second time. He is being honored for his diplomacy in the Middle East. In Zihuatanejo, Guerrero, residents and visitors used the occasion of the International Day of Peace to honor former President Vicente Guerrero – Mexico’s man of peace!  Vicente Guerrero - black

Vicente Guerrero (1782 – 1831) was a general in Mexico’s war of independence; he helped write the Constitution; and served as president from 1829 – 1831.

Celebrated as one of Mexico’s most important national heroes, Vicente Guerrero played a significant military role in the independence of the new nation. He also helped to organize a group of Haitians in Cuba that would aid in an uprising against the Spaniards on that island. But, Guerrero’s most poignant accomplishment was the abolition of human slavery in Mexico during his presidential administration. In fact, Mexico was the first country in North America to abolish slavery in 1829 – four years before Canada, and 36 years before the United States!

And many people in the world, even within Mexico, do not know that this great man in history and president of his nation was of African descent – the first black president in North America! (Not USA President Obama!)

The ceremony to honor President Vicente Guerrero was on Saturday, September 19 at Eco-Tianguis market that is held every week along the beachfront in central Zihuatanejo. The setting is perfect – right next to Vicente Guerrero Elementary School (the oldest in Zihuatanejo), and across from our Peace Monument.

Eco 6

Eco-Tianguis beachfront market event is held every Saturday in Zihuatanejo from 9 a.m. – 2 p.m., and includes organic food, art, and entertainment.

Ecotianguis setting

The market is next to Vicente Guerrero Elementary School and across from Zihuatanejo’s Peace Monument.

Gabriela Trejo, Director of Eco-Tianguis, delivered the tribute that including reading the Guerrero Decree that freed all people in Mexico. The crowd shouted in tribute to President Guerrero – Viva Mexico!

20150919_095437

Guerrero Decree

Then, in typical Zihuatanejo, GUERRERO style – we had a fiesta! A PEACE FEAST! Everyone laughed, danced, hugged, and enjoyed the friendship and peace!

Traditional Mexican folklore dancers performed.

Look at this traditional wedding dance.

For 2015, the theme for the International Day of Peace is “Partnerships for Peace – Dignity for All!” This is a perfect occasion to honor our hero of peace – President Vicente Guerrero of Mexico!

Vicente Guerrero Day

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Related Articles:

Afromexican Vicente Guerrero Helps Lead the Revolution, Writes the Constitution, and Becomes President

A Short History of September 16 -Independence Day in Mexico

Eco-Tianguis Sanka Beachfront Market in Zihuatanejo Offers Organic Foods, Art, and Entertainment

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Join the Global Feast for Peace in Zihuatanejo on September 20th or 21st!

By: Patricia Ann Talley, Editor, and Member of the Advisory Council of City Leaders for International Cities of Peace

What better way to celebrate peace than to share a meal with family and friends! The International Cities of Peace Organization invites you to share a meal in your home, or in a restaurant, to celebrate the International Day of Peace on Monday, September 21st. In Mexico, Sunday is devoted to family and friends (only day off), so we encourage a “Feast for Peace” celebration on September 20th.

Feast for Peace

Mr. Fred Arment, Executive Director of International Cities of Peace, says: “We need YOU to Feast for Peace on the International Day of Peace, or any day around Sept. 21st.  It can be a family meal, a neighborhood get-together, a group pot-luck, or a group dinner at a restaurant. Celebrate the peace we have; Contemplate the work to be done. Let’s work together to make the Global Feast an annual event for peace.”

In 2013, there were 30 Feasts for Peace; 98 in 2014. This year’s goal is 150 Feasts around the world. “We can beat that by opening up our homes, and including our restaurants for meals as ‘Feasts for Peace’ during Peace Week,” says Arment. You can post your event on the Global Feast for Peace map: Global Feast for Peace Map.

ICPblockLogo

Ixtapa Zihuatanejo, Guerrero, Mexico became an International City of Peace in 2015, joining a sisterhood of over 120 cities of peace around the world. We’re on the map!  Join these “Feasts for Peace” in our area:

  • Sunday, September 20, 2015, 9:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m., at Margarita’s Restaurant in Playa Madera: Enjoy a Sunday brunch with family and friends. Take someone out and buy them a meal. The entire day will be devoted to peace.

2126 × 1417_Ad-MARGARITAS_RGB_alta

  • Monday, September 21, 2015, 9:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m., at Viceroy Hotel in Zihuatanejo: Hotel guests and the general public are invited to Viceroy Hotel to participate in the “Global Fest for Peace.” All restaurants in the hotel will feature special menus for the day.

Viceroy_logo_ZIHUATANEJO-01

Many years ago, at a business convention, I heard a Jewish Rabbi give a speech about social responsibility. He talked about the difference between heaven and hell, comparing it to sharing or not sharing a meal. Interestingly, this video from Iraq demonstrates this concept.

ماذا فهمت من فكرة الفديو هذا ؟

Posted by Ali Hadi Ali on Tuesday, September 9, 2014

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Materiales educativos de la paz en español / Peace Education Materials in Spanish

Por/By: Profesora Patricia Ann Talley, Directora Executiva de Peace in Action Collaborative Education Group en Zihuatanejo, Guerrero, México y Asesora para la organización de International Cities of Peace

El tema de este año para el Día Internacional de la Paz de las Naciones Unidas, a celebrarse el día 21 de septiembre del presente año, es “COLABORADORES POR LA PAZ – DIGNIDAD PARA TODOS”.

This year’s theme for the United Nations International Day of Peace on September 21st is “Partnerships for Peace – Dignity for All.” 

15-00073b_IDP2015_poster_SP_2

El reconocimiento del Día Internacional de la Paz es un requisito para la certificación como Ciudad Internacional de la Paz. También se requiere que los programas educativos en paz.(Requisitos para la certificación como Ciudad Internacional de la Paz)

Recognition of the International Day of Peace is a requirement for certification as an International City of Peace. Educational programs in peace are also required.

ICPblockLogo

Talleres y actividades de paz/ Peace Workshops & Activities

Comunidades de todo el mundo se preparan para celebrar con diversas actividades y talleres para niños y jóvenes. A continuación se presenta una colección de materiales de educación para la paz en español para profesores y estudiantes a utilizar.

Communities around the world are preparing to celebrate with various activities and workshops for children and youth. Following is a collection of peace education materials in Spanish for teachers and students to use.

Para Los Niños y Secundaria:

Actividades de la Paz de World Peace Prayer Society: Actividades de la Paz – World Peace Prayer Society

La Carta de la Tierra: La Carta de la Tierra

La Escuela – Un Espacio Para la Educación para la Paz Interior: La Escuela – Un Espacio Para la Educacion para la Paz Interior

Cómo hacer palomas de la paz: Cómo hacer palomas de la paz

Preparatoria y Adultos:

CREDO de Viajero Sereno: CREDO de Viajero Sereno

Desarrollo Sustentable y Educación Medioambiental: DESARROLLO SUSTENTABLE Y EDUCACION MEDIOAMBIENTAL

Declaración Universal de Responsabilidades Humanas: Declaración Universal de Responsabilidades Humanas-1

Espiritual:

Comprendiendo Conflicto: Comprendiendo-Conflicto.pptx

La Familia Como Paz:  LaFamilia-como-Paz.pptx

Valores Espirituales: ValoresEspirituales-Liderazgo.pptx

Visión de la Paz: Vision-de-la-Paz-de-Dios.pptx

QUE LA PAZ PREVALEZCA EN LA TIERRA / MAY PEACE PREVAIL ON EARTH

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Mexican Gymnasts Shine in Pan Am Games – Zihuatanejo Has Gymnasts Too!

When the world thinks of gymnasts, people have not historically thought of Mexicans. But, Mexican gymnasts now compete proudly in this sport. Recently, the world watched as these athletes performed in the Pan American Games held in Toronto. Look at the video of some of our international competitors.

Mexicanos en Los PanamericanosToda la pasión y los mejores momentos de los Gimnastas Mexicanos en TORONTO 2015¡No se lo pierdan! #abiertomexicanodegimnasia

Posted by Abierto Mexicano de Gimnasia on Tuesday, July 14, 2015

Gymnastics is a wonderful sport that teaches discipline, concentration, teamwork, and other values as well as the physical ones. In the Ixtapa Zihuatanejo area, we have Gym Chan Zihuatanejo program for children and youth. The program is run by Professor Jorge Luis Chan, who is devoted to the youth in our area.

Gym Chan 2

Professor Chan teaches discipline, gymnastics, and grace to kids in our area. Kids are trained for athletic competitions.

Gym Chan 1

Here is a video of the group’s competition in Acapulco in March 2015.

And, below is a photo of the medal winners at the gymnastics convention in Lazaro Cardenas that was held on June 23, 2015, where the team won 9 medals: 5 First Place; 2 Second Place; and 2 Third Place. Great work!

Gymnasts winners

Gymnastic classes for children are held every afternoon during the summer in Parque Los Mangos in central Zihuatanejo. Some kids are just born to be. . .

Born to be a gymnast

For more information about classes, contact Professor Chan on Facebook: Gym Chan Zihuatanejo

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Respond to the South Carolina Massacre and Give TRUE Meaning to the International Day of Peace!

June 13th marked the 100 Day Countdown to the International Day of Peace on September 21, and community groups, churches, schools, and businesses around the world prepare to celebrate with a day of peace and unity. For 2015, the theme is “Partnerships for Peace – Dignity for All.”

But then, we received news that nine African-American church members in South Carolina, USA, were massacred in an act of racial hatred. The terrorist displayed the confederate flag of the United States Civil war. This act follows a series of police incidents and deaths of black youth in the United States.

Now, this year’s theme for the International Day of Peace has even greater and deeper meaning, for the United States – and for the world.

First, let’s take a look at history in terms of “core principles and values.”

The US Civil War is usually discussed in terms of states’ rights, economics, or the abolition of slavery. Let’s look at a facet that is seldom taught: The US Civil War in terms of the difference in peoples’ core principles and values.

confederate flag

In 1776, the Constitution of the United States promised “liberty, justice, and equality for all.” The USA, like many other countries, has struggled to fulfill this promise to all people, but these are the core values and principles of the nation.

In 1861, when southern states revolted and the confederacy was formed, its Vice President Alexander Stephens clearly articulated core values and principles that are opposite.

“Those ideas, however, were fundamentally wrong. They rested upon the assumption of the equality of races. This was an error. . .  Our new government is founded upon exactly the opposite idea; its foundations are laid, its corner-stone rests upon the great truth, that the Negro is not equal to the white man; that slavery — subordination to the superior race — is his natural and normal condition. This, our new government, is the first, in the history of the world, based upon this great physical, philosophical, and moral truth.”1

It is unbelievable to me that in 2015, the official display of the confederate flag is still even being debated! And, it’s frightening that it is still hung proudly in many homes in the United States.

What can we do, now?

Sentiments of sympathy for the South Carolina victims are not enough. The situation calls for international and national dialogue about the core principles and values that you want to implement in your life, in your family, in your community, in your country, and with other people in the world.

IDP 2015 Poster

It’s time to search your soul and talk to others. Do you REALLY believe in “liberty, justice, and equality for all?” How do you feel about other races, other nationalities, other religions, or a different sexual orientation?

This year, rather than signing peace songs, open up this dialog and give true meaning to the International Day of Peace and “Partnerships for Peace – Dignity for All.”

This is Peace in Action!

Acknowledgement:

I thank my father, Mr. Alfred E. Talley, who researched and provided Alexander Stephens’ cornerstone statement of principles for this article, and for teaching me to stand up for my principles.

References:

  1. Alexander Stephens, Cornerstone Speech, Savannah; Georgia, March 21, 1861. http://civilwarcauses.org/stephans.htm

About the Author: Patricia Ann Talley, MBA is Executive Director of the Peace in Action Collaborative Education Group, based in Zihuatanejo, Guerrero, Mexico, and the managing editor of this publication. She is a specialist in international marketing and communications. Originally from Southfield, Michigan, she and her husband Bill Tucker have lived and worked in Mexico for over 18 years. Both serve as advisors to the International Cities of Peace and the World Peace Prayer Society. 

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ATTENTION – Travelers and U.S. Citizens Abroad! Embassies Suspend Giving Visas and Passports

If you are a U.S. citizen living in a foreign country and need your passport renewed, or if you plan to visit the United States and need a visa – take note! ALL U.S. Embassies and Consulate Offices in ALL countries have temporarily suspended issuing these documents.

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Per a News Release from the US State Department – June 12, 2015

Passports and Visas:

The Bureau of Consular Affairs is currently experiencing technical problems with the overseas passport and visa systems. This issue is not specific to any particular country, citizenship document, or visa category.

The Consular Consolidated Database (CCD) problems we are experiencing are not the same challenges we overcame last summer. We are working urgently to correct the problems and restore our system to full operational status as soon as possible.

We apologize to applicants who are experiencing delays or are unable to obtain a passport overseas, Consular Report of Birth Abroad, or U.S. visa at this time.

Passport applications accepted overseas on or after May 26, 2015 are affected. Individuals who submitted online applications or were interviewed for visas on or after June 9 may experience a delay in the processing. The systems in place to perform required national security checks before we issue visas are experiencing technical difficulties. Domestic passport issuances are not affected at this time.

We are able to issue emergency passports to U.S. citizens overseas for urgent travel. We are seeking to assist non-immigrant visa applicants with urgent humanitarian travel. Travelers with an urgent humanitarian need for travel should contact their nearest U.S. embassy or consulate.

We are aware of pending overseas adoption cases, including in China. We are prioritizing these cases and seek to issue these visas with few delays.

We regret the inconvenience to travelers, and remain committed to facilitating legitimate travel while protecting our borders. We are working urgently to correct the problem and expect our system to be fully operational again soon.

We will post updates to http://www.Travel.State.Gov as more information becomes available.

Click to download a copy of the news report: US State Department – Technological Systems Issue

Notice of Comprised Personal Information:

The U.S. Department of State mailed letters on June 9 to a limited number of U.S. passport customers whose personal information may have been compromised. The letter provides specific details regarding the breach of personal information, how to contact us for further assistance, and guidance on how to protect yourself from identity theft.

The Department has taken immediate action to help protect you. The letter mentions an offer from the Department to sign-up for one year of free credit monitoring services. This service monitors your credit records at all 3 credit reporting agencies and notifies you when there are certain changes to your credit bureau file(s). In addition, the identity theft insurance policy will reimburse you for certain out-of-pocket expenses and lost wages in the event you are a victim of identity theft. We have also flagged your U.S. passport record in our databases to prevent others from using your identity to renew or replace your passport. Your U.S. passport is still valid for international travel.

We apologize for any inconvenience and concern this incident may cause you. We are thoroughly examining our information security systems and procedures to safeguard against unauthorized access of passport records.

Click to download: Letter Regarding Compromised Personal Information

Related Articles:

US Travelers Encouraged to Register with Embassy in Mexico City -More Local Contacts Needed

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The Mexican Immigration Problem: How it Started – Part 3 (Final)

By:  William H. Tucker, Publisher

The need of U.S. employers to import Mexican manual labor was first caused by the expansion of cattle ranches in the Southwest, and by the increase of fruit production in California between 1850 and 1880. Between 1850 and 1880, 55,000 Mexican workers immigrated to the United States to become field hands in regions that had, until very recently, belonged to Mexico.

The presence of Mexican workers in the American labor market started with the construction of the railroad between Mexico and the U.S. That presence grew between 1880 and 1890. As much as 60 percent of the railway working crews were Mexican. Rodolfo Tuiran, in his paper “Past and Present of the Mexican Immigration to the United States”, reports that the initial flood of migrant workers to the United States were mainly skilled miners, work hands from cattle ranches in Mexico, indentured servants fleeing Mexican farms, small independent producers who were forced north by natural disasters or Indian raids and workers affected by the secession. The immigration intensified with the Mexican Revolution of 1910. It is estimated that between 1910 and 1917, 53 thousand workers per year migrated to the U.S.

Another factor that contributed to the migration of Mexican workers to the U.S. was World War One. During the war Mexican workers performed jobs not only in the agricultural field but also in the industry and service area. In those years it was easy for the Mexican workers to enter the United States because they were needed.

After World War One ended the need for Mexican workers diminished except in the agricultural industry. The years of the Great Depression saw another exodus of many persons of Mexican heritage including some who were U.S. citizens. A report in USA Today, published in 2006, stated: “Tens of thousands, and possibly more than 400,000, Mexicans and Mexican-Americans were pressured through raids and job denials to leave the USA during the Depression. Every President from Hoover to Obama has had to meet the problem of illegal Mexican immigration.

It seemed whenever the United States found a reason to close the door on Mexican immigration, some event would force them to reopen that door. Such was the case when the United States entered World War II. In 1942, the United States was heading to war with the fascist powers of Europe. Labor was siphoned from all areas of United States industry and poured into those which supported the war efforts. Between the period of 1942 and 1964, millions of Mexicans were imported into the U.S. under the Bracero Program to work temporarily on contract to United States growers. After the war, however, during the Truman years more than 127,000 were formally deported and more than 3.2 million left voluntarily rather than face deportation — a total of nearly 3.4 million.

In 1954, President Eisenhower implemented operation “Wet Back” that saw another 1.3 million Mexicans deported or voluntarily repatriated in a just a few months. Presidents Kennedy, Nixon, Reagan, Carter, Clinton, and Bush have all had programs to address the problem of illegal immigration but none of them have been successful in resolving the problem.

Today it is estimated that there are over ten million illegal Mexican immigrants in the United States and 13.9 million Mexican families affected by our immigration policy. Mass deportation is not the answer to the problem.

The recent change in U.S. policy seems to be a reasonable first step in formulating a comprehensive solution. The Obama Administration has said that it will delay deporting many illegal immigrants who don’t have criminal records and will offer them a chance to apply for a work permit. The government will focus on sending back criminals and those who might be a national security or public safety threat. This seems to be a reasonable approach to a very difficult problem; however, the Republicans have stalled this effort with a series of federal lawsuits and received an injunction from a Texas federal court (no surprise here) prohibiting the implementation of this approach. The Republicans have a majority in both the house and the senate that would put the “ball” in their court to come up with some meaningful legislation to tackle this important issue of immigration but they seem to be divided on the issue and reluctant to act.

It’s time to address the problem!

Related Articles:

The Mexican Immigration Problem in the USA: How it Started – Part 1

The Mexican Immigration Problem: How it Started -Part 2

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The Mexican Immigration Problem – How It Started: Part 2

By: William H. Tucker, Publisher.

Today’s illegal Mexican immigration problem started in 1836, when Texas declared its independence from Mexico that eventually led to the Mexican-American War of 1846. This war would result in the United States forcibly taking the territory of Texas, California, Arizona, New Mexico, Nevada, Utah and parts of Colorado.

Immediately after American settlers in Texas felt secure with their victory over General Santa Anna and the Mexican army, many turned their thoughts to annexation with the United States. In August 1837, the Texas Minister to the United States, Memucan Hunt, Jr., submitted an annexation proposal to President Martin Van Buren’s administration.

The Van Buren administration had too many domestic, economic and political problems to seriously consider annexing Texas and risking war with Mexico. Martin Van Buren became the eighth president of the United States in March 1837, just five weeks before the Panic of 1837 that devastated that country’s economy. It was one of the worst financial crises in U.S. history. The monetary crisis was followed by a five-year depression, with bank failures and record-high unemployment. The crisis was caused by land speculation financed with derivative documents that could not later be negotiated and became worthless. In addition to the US financial crisis, the Van Buren administration had a problem with the British government over disputed territory in Canada and Oregon. The United States was also engaged in a second war against the Seminoles in Florida, which was unpopular. The forced migration of the Native American people to reservations in the west was a monumental domestic problem.

Instead of settling the financial dispute between American citizens in Texas and the Mexican government by force, President Van Buren sought a diplomatic solution, so in August 1837, Van Buren denied Texas’ formal request to join the United States. It would take 10 years for Texas to become the twenty-eight state of the United States.

President Martin Van Buren served only one term in office, from 1837 to 1841, and was easily defeated by William Henry Harrison, the ninth President of theUnited States. Harrison died in office on April 4, 1841, one month after his inauguration and was succeeded by his vice president, John Tyler, who became the tenth President of the United States on April 6, 1841. The most famous and significant achievement of Tyler’s administration was the annexation of the Republic of Texas, which concluded in 1845.

Starting in 1843, President Tyler entered into negotiations with the Republic of Texas for an annexation treaty, which he submitted to the U.S. Senate on June 8, 1844. The treaty was defeated 16 to 35, well below the two-thirds majority necessary for ratification. In November of 1844, James K. Polk, a known expansionist, was elected the eleventh President of the United States (1845-1849). The Tyler administration realized that public opinion was in favor of annexation. He consulted with President-elect Polk, and they set out to accomplish the annexation by means of a joint resolution. On February 26, 1845 six days before Polk took office, Congress passed the joint resolution. The citizens of Texas approved the new constitution and the annexation in October 1845. Polk signed the documents formally integrating Texas into the United States on December 29, 1845.

The annexation of Texas by the United States provided the spark that fueled the desire of politicians to continue their territorial expansion, and by 1850 the United States had included what are now Texas, Arizona, New Mexico, Utah, Nevada, Colorado and California into its territory –and thus, our immigration problem began.

To be continued.

Related Article:

The Mexican Immigration Problem in the USA – How it Started-Part 1

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The Mexican Immigration Problem in the U.S.A. – How It Started: Part 1

By: William H. Tucker, Publisher

There is much debate in the United States about immigration, especially from Mexico. Let’s remember the roots of this problem. Today’s illegal Mexican immigration problem was started by the largest land grab in modern history. In 1836, Texas declared its independence from Mexico that eventually led to the Mexican-American War of 1846. This war would result in the United States forcibly taking the Mexican states of Texas, California, Arizona, New Mexico, Nevada, Utah and parts of Colorado.

United States forcibly took the Mexican states of Texas, California, Arizona, New Mexico, Nevada, Utah and parts of Colorado.

In August of 1821, Mexico declared its independence from Spain with the Treaty of Cordoba, which was a compromise treaty after ten long years of fighting. The new country emerged from the war essentially bankrupt with little money for the military to protect its vast borders or people. Anglo-American immigrants, primarily from the southern United States, began immigrating to the Mexican state of “Coahuila y Tejas” (later renamed Texas) in the early 1820s at the invitation of the Mexican government, which sought to populate the sparsely inhabited lands of its northern frontier. Many Anglo-American immigrants brought their African slaves.

Anglo-Americans soon became a majority in Coahuila y Tejas (Texas) and eventually became disillusioned with Mexican rule. The Mexican state of Coahuila y Tejas endorsed a plan for the gradual emancipation of the state’s slaves in 1827. In 1829, Mexico abolished slavery, some thirty-six years before the United States did the same in 1865. This loss of unpaid labor, if actually enforced in Coahuila y Tejas, would have been a severe blow to the region’s emerging cotton economy. This angered many slaveholding Anglo-American immigrants who had moved to the state from the southern USA and had lived in Mexico less than a decade.

Over the next ten years, Mexico tried to control Anglo-American immigrants through laws and military skirmishes to protect its sovereignty, but they were not successful in stemming the flow of immigrants from the north and the call for Texas independence.

There were not many large battles fought between the Mexican army and the American immigrants, but the last one is the most famous. In December 1835, a group of disgruntled Anglo-American immigrants had taken control of the Alamo, an old mission in San Antonio. Mexican General Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna moved his army of several thousand men into the area and decided to make an example of the insurgents. In the early hours of March 6, 1836, the Mexican army, led by General Santa Anna, attacked the Alamo after a thirteen-day siege, in what became known as the Battle of the Alamo. Almost all of the defenders, estimated at 182–257 men, were killed, including James Bowie, Davy Crockett, and William B. Travis. Later in March, a second event occurred. Santa Anna’s army managed to force the surrender of 342 Anglo-Americans near Goliad. Santa Anna ordered the execution of all of the prisoners. The two battles, the Alamo and Goliad, served to bring bickering Anglo-Americans together in opposition to General Santa Anna.

After the Alamo, the Mexican army clearly had the momentum and the Anglo-American immigrants and the Texas army were fleeing toward the USA border. In February 1836, General Santa Anna led a large army across the Rio Grande in pursuit of the fleeing Texans. He was delayed, however, by the unexpectedly determined defense of the Alamo. Sam Houston led a successful retreat, but other insurgents were defeated and massacred in late March. Santa Anna pursued the rebels, overstretching his supply line and thus isolating his forces on San Jacinto Prairie. There, on April 21, he was routed by Houston in a surprise attack that lasted only eighteen minutes. Most of the Mexican army was killed, and the others fled. Santa Anna was found hiding in a swamp and was taken prisoner. Mexican troops then withdrew from Texas. Meanwhile, the Texans declared their independence from Mexico on March 2, 1836, and organized a provisional government. The Republic of Texas remained independent until 1845, when it became part of the United States.

To be continued.

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Zihuatanejo Holds International Youth and Educators Webinars for Peace!

Our youth and young adults in the Americas are calling out for recognition and protection of their human rights. In Mexico, forty-three students were recently kidnapped and murdered. In the United States, youth are protesting the disproportional arrests and killings of African-Americans by police. Recently, Canada singled itself out as the only country to raise objections over a landmark United Nations document re-establishing the protection of the rights of indigenous people. If we want peace in the Americas, we must teach peace.

Paz en Acion thumbnail

During the Celebration of Peace in February 2015, the Education Peace Team of the International Day of Peace NGO Committee at the United Nations collaborated with the Zihuatanejo Peace Committee and Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan to host an international youth conference for peace and a teacher’s conference for peace.

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Hosts of the conference were (left to right) Anahi Toledo of the Zihuatanejo Peace Committee; Dr. Talia Weltman-Cisneros from Wayne State University; Professor Patricia Ann Talley, Executive Director of Peace in Action! Education Collaborative; and Jennifer Kim, the Co-chair of the Education Peace Team.

Students, teachers, and community leaders from around the world viewed and participated in a virtual peace conference for youth. Local students, teachers, and special guests attended the convention and received instruction and tools to help them become peacemakers in their own communities. Students from around the world were connected by Webinar technology.

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10527823_10206029429994129_6123105287860767946_nProfessors Donaji Mendez Tello and Blanca Leyva from Universidad Autonoma de Guerrero attended the conference with students from the Zihuatanejo area. 

Master Charles Kim from the Peace School of Chicago led the first virtual Yoga for Peace session! Mr. Jean Trudel from Cercle de Paix in Montreal, Canada, and Kelly Egan of INNEO Communications in New York, and Max Ringelheim of Vonvo.com produced the event.

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The Webinar was recorded so you can watch it!

As teachers and educators, we must respond to these situations and help guide our youth to peace, rather than allow them to turn toward violence. Following the youth conference, teachers, educators, community leaders, and parents, participated in an Educators Peace Conference.

Educators responded to the youth to help guide them to peace, rather than allow them to turn toward violence. This educator’s conference is also available to view.

This is peace in action! This is for the students and youth of the world.

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Zihuatanejo Hosts International Youth and Educators Webinars for Peace on February 5, 2015

Our youth and young adults in the Americas are calling out for recognition and protection of their human rights. In Mexico, forty-three students were recently kidnapped and murdered. In the United States, youth are protesting the disproportional arrests and killings of African-Americans by police. Recently, Canada singled itself out as the only country to raise objections over a landmark United Nations document re-establishing the protection of the rights of indigenous people. If we want peace in the Americas, we must teach peace.

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On Thursday, February 5, 2015, the world will join Ixtapa Zihuatanejo for two exciting peace education events.  Please join us for these international Webinars! You can participate from your home, school, or office.

Go to: https://vonvo.com/v/peace-in-action.  Use a laptop or desktop computer with a videocam; no mobile devices. Use Google Chrome or Firefox. To participate and chat, create a personal user account on Vonvo using email or Facebook login.

un vonvo on big board

The Education Peace Team of the International Day of Peace NGO Committee at the United Nations

 in collaboration with

The Zihuatanejo Peace Committee, Ixtapa Zihuatanejo, Guerrero, México

Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, United States of America

 PRESENT

PEACE IN ACTION! YOUTH PEACE WEBINAR AND CONVENTION (Spanish/English)

February 5, 2015

10:30 am – 12:30 am CST/11:30 am – 1:30 pm EST/ 8:30 am – 10:30 am PST

We welcome students, teachers, and community leaders from around the world to view and participate in a virtual peace conference for youth. Students will receive instruction and tools to help them become peacemakers in their own communities. Also included is the first virtual Yoga for Peace session. Help us set a world record.

 WELCOME AND INTRODUCTIONS/ WHERE IS IXTAPA ZIHUATANEJO?

Lic. Omar Espinosa, Director of Youth Programs, City of Zihuatanejo

Lic. Maria de la Luz Otero, Assistant Director of Youth Programs, City of Zihuatanejo

LLC. Anahi Toledo, Public Relations Manager, Zihuatanejo Peace Committee

Lic. Francisco Huitrón, Youth Coordinator, Zihuatanejo Peace Committee

Introduction: Dr. Talia Weltman-Cisneros, Department of Classical and Modern Languages, Literatures and Cultures, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, USA

Presentations

THE WORLD YOUTH SEGMENT: Ms. Jillian Abballe, Program Associate, United Nations & International Affairs, General Board of Church and Society, New York and . Geneva; with Mr. Francisco Huitrón, Youth Coordinator, Zihuatanejo Peace Committee

USING TECHNOLOGY FOR PEACE: Mr. Mohammad Bakhrieba, UN Ambassadors of the World Virtual Program, Jeddah City, Saudi Arabia (Biography Mohammad Bakhrieba)

YOGA FOR PEACE: Master Charles Kim, The Peace School of Chicago. (Master Charles Kim- bioLet’s set a world record for a viral Yoga class!

Master Kim

High school and college students will present different expressive forms that support and facilitate peace.

Universidad Autónoma de Guerrero, Unidad Académica de Turismo, Zihuatanejo, Guerrero, México

Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, United States of America

MIME Group, Southfield, Michigan, United States of America

Instituto Tecnológico de la Costa Grande, Zihuatanejo, Guerrero, México

Verbal Aikido, Luke Archer of Betterfly, Lyon, France

As teachers, educators, community leaders, and parents, we must respond to our youth and help guide them to peace, rather than allow them to turn toward violence. Later in the afternoon, we will conduct a dynamic conference and discussion.

INTERNATIONAL EDUCATORS WEBINAR AND CONFERENCE (in English)

February 5, 2015

4:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. CST/5:00 pm – 7:00 pm EST/ 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm PST

Go to: https://vonvo.com/v/peace-in-action.  Use a laptop or desktop computer with a videocam; no mobile devices. Use Google Chrome or Firefox. To participate and chat, create a personal user account on Vonvo using email or Facebook login.

HOSTS/ WELCOME

From the Co-Chairs of the Education Peace Team of the International Day of Peace NGO Committee at the United Nations

Ms. Jennifer Kim, Director, The Peace School of Chicago – Ms. Kim is a special guest in Ixtapa Zihuatanejo for the Celebration of Peace, February 2-8, 2015.(Jennifer Kim – Bio, The Peace School of Chicago)

Jennifer Kim - Education Peace Team - headshot

Mr. George Anthony, Executive Director, Senior Facilitator, Peace Dynamics and Conflict Resolution, New York

 MODERATORS/ INTRODUCTION

Dr. Talia Weltman-Cisneros,Department of Classical and Modern Languages, Literatures and Cultures, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, USA

Patricia Ann Talley, MBA, Executive Director, Peace in Action! Collaborative and Founder of the Zihuatanejo Peace Committee

Introduction: The historical approach to teaching youth in the Americas. Time for change!

INDIGENOUS TEACHINGS

Introduction: Jean Trudel, Executive Director, Cercle de Paix, Montreal, Quebec, Canada (Jean Trudel – bio)

Jean Trudel photo

Special Guest: Chief Dominique Rankin – Anishnawbe Message of Peace, Montreal, Quebec, Canada (Dominique Rankin bio)

Chief Dominique (T8aminik) Rankin

HUMAN RIGHTS AND HUMAN DIGNITY: THE ROLE OF RELIGION AND FAITH-BASED ORGANIZATIONS

Speakers 

Mr. Liberato “Levi” C. Bautista , Conference of Non-Governmental Organizations in Consultative Relationship with the United Nations (CoNGO), and Assistant General Secretary for United Nations and International Affairs of the General Board of Church and Society, United Methodist Church

Barbara E. Talley, MPA, Founder, Detroit Renaissance Peace Center, Southfield, Michigan, USA / Interfaith Dialog

Discussion

DIVERSITY AND STUDENT ACTIVISM

Speakers

Dr. Jorge Chinea, Director, Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, USA

Barbara Purifoy-Seldon, RDH, MS, MEd, Associate Professor, Retired, Assistant to Dean Special Projects, University of Detroit Mercy School of Dentistry, Detroit, Michigan, USA

Discussion

SOCIAL JUSTICE ACTIVISM AND YOUTH CONFLICT

Speakers

Dorothy L. Dean, Esq., President, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Task Force, Southfield, Michigan, USA

Barbara L. Jones, MA, Community Dispute Resolution Specialist, Center for Peace & Conflict Studies, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, USA

Discussion

CONSTRUCTIVE DIALOG/ TOOLS FOR PEACE EDUCATION

Speakers

Dr. Fred Pearson, Director, Center for Peace & Conflict Studies, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, USA

Mr. George Anthony, Executive Director, Senior Facilitator, Peace Dynamics and Conflict Resolution, New York

Ms. Jennifer Kim, Director, The Peace School of Chicago

Closing Discussion

This is peace in action! 

We thank our sponsors of this fantastic international peace event!

Sponsors of Webinars

Related Article:

Celebration of Peace -Feb 2-8, 2015 – Schedule of Events with the Zihuatanejo Sailfest

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Club Rotary Zihuatanejo to Host District 4185 Governor, UN Speaker, and Traditional Dresses on Friday, February 6

Club Rotary of Zihuatanejo is one of our proud sponsors of the Celebration of Peace in Ixtapa Zihuatanejo. Club Rotary Zihuatanejo meets every week at 3 pm at Catalina Beach Resort in Zihuatanejo, on the road to La Ropa Beach. On Friday, February 6, Rotarians from Zihuatanejo, Ixtapa, Morelos, San Miguel Allende, Portand, and other cities will join together for a special celebration of peace. The public and other Rotarians visiting the area are invited.

Club Rotary Session of Peace

The special guest for the session is DG Sergio Romero Barrades, Governor of Rotary International District 4185. Mr. Liberato “Levi” Bautista will be the guest speaker. He is from the Conference of Non-Governmental Organizations for Consultative Relationship with the United Nations (CoNGO), and an internationally renowned expert on human rights. Both are invited guests to the Celebration of Peace, and will be available for discussion.

Levi Bautista

 

Mr. Liberato “Levi” Bautista will be the guest speaker. He is from the Conference of Non-Governmental Organizations for Consultative Relationship with the United Nations (CoNGO), and an internationally renowned expert on human rights.

Dr. Talia Weltman-Cisneros from the Department of Classical and Modern Languages, Literatures and Cultures at Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan will also attend, along with Professor Candarleria Donají Mendez Tello from the Universidad Autónoma de Guerrero. Both are experts in the African presence in Mexico and are collaborators on the “Pathways to Freedom in the Americas” project, a diversity educational program that was initiated by the Zihuatanejo Peace Committee in 2011. The exhibition is currently touring the state of Michigan. See: Exhibit on President Vicente Guerrero and Afro-Mexicans at Southfield, Michigan Library for February 2015.

At the Rotary session, Professor Tello will present traditional dresses from the Costa Chica region of Guerrero where there is a large population of Afro-Mexicans. Both professors will be available for discussion.

Afro Mexican dress4

The cost for the session is $150 pesos, including lunch. Reservations are required by February 1. Email, Gerarda Gonzalez, President mailto:gera_gato2@hotmail.com.

Related Articles:

Celebration of Peace, Feb. 2-8, 2015 – Schedule of Events with the Zihuatanejo Sailfest

Yoga for Peace: On the Beach February 4 and 7; Viral on February 5

Zihuatanejo Hosts International Youth and Educators Webinars for Peace on February 5, 2015

Ambassador of Peace Art Collection on Display at Zihuatanejo Museum Starting February 4, 2015

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Guerrero to Honor “Immigrants of the Year for 2014” – Ceremony in Acapulco on December 5, 2014

The National Migration Institute (INM) in the state of Guerrero will celebrate its fourteenth annual “International Migrants Day” on December 5, 2014. The year, the ceremony will be held in Acapulco to honor several immigrants from within the state, including Patrick Ward Crosby and Dennis Carlton Ferguson from the Ixtapa Zihuatanejo area. The award ceremony will be held at La Piazza, the Imperial World Resort in the Diamond Zone at 5:00 p.m.

The International Migrants Day has been celebrated since 2000 following a proclamation by the General Assembly of the United Nations that recognized the increase of migration flows in the world. In 1990, the Assembly also adopted the United Nations Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families.

According to the National Migration Institute, the foreign population in Guerrero is 2,147, out of the total state population of over 3.4 million. The foreign nationalities with most presence in the state are US, Canadian, Cuban, Chinese, French, German, Colombian, Italian, Spanish and Guatemalan.

2014 Distinguished Immigrants of the Year

 Patrick Ward Crosby, a US citizen and General Director of the WA-GRO Foundation that supports education, culture, art, health, economy, and the environment (ecology). The foundation created the “Learning Foundation” program, working with special needs children with all types of disabilities. Mr. Ward resides in the Troncones, an outlining area of Ixtapa Zihuatanejo.

Patrick Ward Crosby

WAGRO Foundation

Dennis Carlton Ferguson, a Canadian, is founder of the Volando del Sol group home in Barrio Nuevo that is also near Ixtapa Zihuatanejo. The home provides shelter to orphans, and to abused and financially troubled children. The children receive care and education centered on faith, family and the future.

Dennis Fuergson

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Zoila Gazga Salinas, originally from Cuajinicuilapa, Guerrero, is a resident of Santa Anna, California, USA. She is president of the Asociación Civil Unidos por Cuajinicuilapa (United for  Cuajinicuilapa Foundation), and owns and operates Moles Doña Elo. She works to improve the infrastructure of Cuajinicuilapa, and to create jobs for Mexican migrants in America.

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Fedra Miguel Quintana, originally from Iguala de la Independencia, Guerrero, is a resident of Anaheim California, USA. She is president and founder of Club Unidos por Iguala Ca, U.S.A that provides medical care and repatriation of people from that city. She also works to improve the infrastructure in the municipality of Iguala, and is a cultural promoter of Guerrero in the United States.

Karim Gilles Djellit of French nationality is director of the Festival Francés to promote cultural exchange between France and Guerrero, and to develop programs of social cohesion such as a mural painted in his neighborhood of Petaquillas, Guerrero. He has also organized a young chef’s competition and a contemporary dance competition.

Ron Lavender, a US citizen, is vice president of the World Cataract Foundation of Mexico, and vice-chairman of the Friends of Acapulco Foundation that helps the population in Mexico to restore sight through surgery, training, and research. The foundation provides financial assistance to needy children in Acapulco, supports orphanages, and provides donations for braces, scholarships for education, transportation therapies, and surgeries.

INVITACION DIA DEL MIGRANTE 2014

Residents and visitors in the Acapulco area are invited to attend the ceremony (no cost). Entertainment will include a mariachi band, traditional folklore ballet from Guerrero, and Cuban music. There will also be a gastronomic exhibition with international dishes, sponsored by foreigners, associations, schools, hotels and restaurants.

Please note that foreign residents in other parts of Guerrero are note advised to travel to Acapulco at this time. (See:US Embassy Prohibits Road Travel in Guerrero -Airline Flights to Ixtapa Zihuatanejo and Acapulco are OK)

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Zihuatanejo Will Honor Nobel Laureate Malala Yousafzai in 2015 Celebration of Peace

Zihuatanejo, Guerrero, Mexico, joins the world in congratulating seventeen-year-old Malala Yousafzai from Pakistan for winning the 2014 Nobel Peace Prize! Malala was shot in the head by the Taliban two years ago for advocating girls’ right to education. Malala Yousafzai, a devout Muslim, shares the award with Kailash Satyarthi, a Hindu child-rights activist from India. The prize, worth about $1.1 million, will be presented in Oslo, Norway, on December 10, the anniversary of the death of Swedish industrialist Alfred Nobel, who founded the award in 1895.

On February 2–8, 2015, Club Rotario (Rotary) of Zihuatanejo will host its fifth annual Celebration of Peace that will be dedicated to this young champion of peace! The celebration will include the Zihuatanejo Sailfest, an International Youth Peace Conference, a teachers’ conference to develop a peace education program in Spanish, our annual peace walk, and a cultural dance festival—all for the benefit of schools and student scholarships. The theme of the celebration is the Right of Peoples to PeaceMalala - Teach Peace

Zihuatanejo SailFest: The celebration begins with the Zihuatanejo SailFest—a six-day festival that combines fun, games, and beach activities to raise funds for the education of Zihuatanejo’s poorest children. Sailboats come from as far away as Alaska and the Caribbean to participate in what is becoming one of Mexico’s premier sailing events. The event includes sailboat and dingy races, music concerts, kids’ beach day, seminars, chili cook-off, street fairs, regattas, and school tours—all to raise funds for education. During the 2014 event, volunteers raised over $80,000 USD to build schools and to provide scholarships for underprivileged students.

International Youth Peace Conference, Thursday, February 5, 2015, 10:00 a.m.–2:00 p.m. (CST) via Webinar: High school and university students from around the world are invited to join the students of Mexico for an International Youth Peace Conference, using the United Nations theme of the Right of Peoples to Peace. Students, parents, teachers, and community leaders can come to Zihuatanejo or join us via Webinar. Go to the top of this page and “SUBCRIBE” to receive more information.

Peoples Right cropped

Students will make presentations using different expressive forms (culture, verbal aikido, dancing, etc.) that support and facilitate peace, whether between individuals or between local and global communities. Presentations will be made by various student groups, followed by questions and discussions.

  • UAGro, Zihuatanejo, Mexico: The Diversity of Guerrero
  • Wayne State, Detroit, Michigan, USA: Music and Visuals
  • Institut National des Sciences Appliquées, Lyon, France: Verbal Aikido
  • MIME Unspeakable Praise Youth Group: Southfield, Michigan, USA
  • English Class at Instituto Lizardi, Zihuatanejo: A surprise!

Teachers’ Peace Conference, February 5, 2015, 4:00–6:00 p.m. (CST) via Webinar: An objective of our peace event is to develop a peace education program—one that teaches values, ethics, and diversity in Spanish—that can be implemented in developing areas where there might be limited access to the Internet and other teaching tools in Mexico and in other parts of Latin America, or in Hispanic communities in the USA and Canada. Educators from around the world are invited to attend or participate via Webinar. Go to the top of this page and “SUBCRIBE” to receive more information.

Several guests from various United Nations non-governmental organizations will join us:

  • Liberato “Levi” C. Bautista, Assistant General Secretary for United Nations and International Affairs of the General Board of Church and Society and Committee of Non-Governmental Organizations, New York, USA, and Geneva, Switzerland
  • Jillian Abballe, program associate, United Nations & International Affairs, General Board of Church and Society
  • Jennifer Kim and Master Kim, The Peace School, Chicago, Illinois, USA—co-chair, UN Peace Education Team
  • Jean Trudel, Cercle de Paix, Montreal, Quebec, Canada—UN Peace Education Team
  • Kelly Egan, Pathways To Peace, Larkspur, CA, USA—co-chair, UN Communications Peace Team
  • Fumi Johns, Executive Director, the World Peace Prayer Society, New York, USA
  • Dorothy L. Dean, Esq., President, Martin Luther King, Jr. Task Force, Southfield, Michigan, USA; and Mrs. Barbara Seldon and Mrs. Barbara Talley, Dr. MLK, Jr. Education Committee
  • Talia Weltman-Cisneros, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, USA—co-host for International Youth Conference with our tourism university, Universidad Autónoma de Guerrero.

Music concerts, cultural dance festival, Yoga on the beach, Mexican fiesta, and more! It will be a celebration! Peace makes people happy! Join us for an exciting week! Make your hotel reservations now. It will be a sell-out!

Cultural Dancer from Guerrero

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Students! Come to the International Youth Peace Conference in Zihuatanejo, Mexico – Or Participate in a Webinar

High school and university students from around the world! You are invited to participate in the International Youth Peace Conference in Zihuatanejo, Guerrero, Mexico, on February 6, 2015. Your class or group can come to the event, or participate in a webinar.

The International Youth Peace Conference is part of the annual Celebration of Peace in Ixtapa Zihuatanejo that will be held on February 2 – 8, 2015. In addition to the conference, the celebration will include the Zihuatanejo SailFest– a six-day festival that combines fun, games, and beach activities to raise funds for the education of Zihuatanejo’s poorest children – an annual peace walk, and a cultural dance festival.

Since 2010, the community of Ixtapa Zihuatanejo has worked in partnership with the United Nations to establish a sustainable peacebuilding process for its students. Each year, the community organizes a peace education program that starts on September 21, the United Nations International Day of Peace, and concludes the following February with a grand celebration.

For February 2015, we are inviting high school and university students from around the world to join the students of Mexico for this International Youth Peace Conference, where you can share ideas about ways to sustain peace. If you cannot come in person, your class or group can participate through a webinar.

Peoples Right cropped

The International Youth Peace Conference is coordinated by Universidad Autónoma de Guerrero , Zihuatanejo, and Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, USA, in collaboration with Club Rotario (Rotary) of Zihuatanejo.

The theme of the International Youth Peace Conference is the Right of Peoples to Peace. This right can be identified by multiple layers: social peace, political peace, spiritual peace, economic peace, family peace, and so much more.

Students! What is your vision of peace? How can you contribute to that vision? Come and share your artwork, photos, poems, and ideas about ways to sustain peace in your lives, your schools, your communities, and our planet.

Parents, teachers and community leaders! Come and listen to what our youth have to say! They are our leaders of the future.

If your school or university would like to make a presentation at the International Youth Peace Conference, contact:

In the USA or Canada: Dr. Talia Weltman-Cisneros at Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, USA. mailto:eg0885@wayne.edu.

In Mexico: Profesora Donaji Mendez Tello, Universidad Autónoma de Guerrero, Unidad de Turismo Zihuatanejo, mailto:mendezdon@hotmail.com or call – (755) 557-4178.

The Celebration of Peace concludes on Sunday, February 8, 2015, with a Peace Walk along the beachfront and a cultural dance festival. Dancers from throughout the state of Guerrero will perform traditional cultural dances reflecting the diversity of Mexico.

Cultural Dancer from Guerrero

Cultural dance troupes, fraternities, sororities, and ballerinas are invited to participate.

If your group would like to perform in the cultural dance festival, contact: Patricia Ann Talley, Club Rotario Zihuatanejo, mailto:pattalley@imagine-mexico.com

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Club Rotary of Zihuatanejo Invites You to the Celebration of Peace, February 2-8, 2015 -Make Plans Now

Zihuatanejo Plans Cultural Dance Festival for the Celebration of Peace – February 2-8, 2015

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Club Rotary of Zihuatanejo Invites You to the Celebration of Peace, February 2-8, 2015 – Make Plans Now!

Students, parents, teachers, civic leaders, government officials, and tourists! Club Rotario (Rotary) of Zihuatanejo invites you to come and participate in the 5th annual Celebration of Peace in Ixtapa Zihuatanejo, Mexico on February 2-8, 2015. The celebration will include the Zihuatanejo Sailfest, an International Youth Peace Conference, our annual Peace Walk, and a Cultural Dance Festival – all for the benefit of schools and student scholarships. The theme of the celebration is the Right of Peoples to Peace.

Since 2010, the community of Ixtapa Zihuatanejo has worked to establish a sustainable peacebuilding process for its students. “If we want to sustain peace, we must teach peace to our children and demonstrate it through the actions in our daily lives,” says Gerarda Gonzalez, president of Club Rotario (Rotary) of Zihuatanejo.

Each year, the community organizes a peace education program that starts on September 21, on the United Nations International Day of Peace, and concludes the following February with a grand celebration. The celebration for 2015 will be bigger and better than ever! Rotary International Logo

Club Rotario (Rotary) of Zihuatanejo Invites You to the

Celebration of Peace in Ixtapa Zihuatanejo – February 2-8, 2015

Peace Festival 2015

Zihuatanejo Sailfest

Sponsored by: Por Los Niños Education Charity

The celebration begins with the Zihuatanejo SailFest – a six-day festival that combines fun, games, and beach activities to raise funds for the education of Zihuatanejo’s poorest children. Sailboats come from as far away as Alaska and the Caribbean to participate in what is becoming one of Mexico’s premier sailing events. The event includes sailboat and dingy races, music concerts, kids’ beach day, seminars, chili cook-off, street fairs, regattas, and school tours – all to raise funds for education. During the 2014 event, volunteers raised over $80,000 USD to build schools and to provide scholarships for underprivileged students.

See the video of the 2014 event:

International Youth Peace Conference

Coordinated by:

Universidad Autónoma de Guerrero in Zihuatanejo, Guerrero, and Wayne State University in  Detroit, Michigan, USA in collaboration with Club Rotario (Rotary) of Zihuatanejo

UN Logo pnglarge

During the week of the celebration, high school and university students from around the world will meet with the students of Mexico for an International Youth Peace Conference, using the United Nations theme of the Right of Peoples to Peace. This right can be identified by multiple layers: social peace, political peace, spiritual peace, economic peace, family peace and so much more.

Students! What is your vision of peace? How can you contribute to that vision? Come and share your artwork, photos, poems and ideas about ways to sustain peace in your lives, your schools, your communities, and our planet.

Parents, Teachers and Community Leaders! Come and listen to what our youth have to say! They are our leaders of the future.

If you or your school would like to make a presentation at the International Youth Peace Conference, contact:

In the USA or Canada: Dr. Talia Weltman-Cisneros at Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, USA. mailto:eg0885@wayne.edu.

In Mexico: Profesora Donaji Mendez Tello, Universidad Autónoma de Guerrero, Unidad de Turismo Zihuatanejo, mailto:mendezdon@hotmail.com or call, (755) 557-4178.

Peace Walk and Cultural Dance Festival

Coordinated by: Instituto Municipal de la Cultura

Cultural Dancer from Guerrero

The Celebration of Peace concludes on Sunday, February 8, 2015, with a Peace Walk along the beachfront and a cultural dance festival. Dancers from throughout the state of Guerrero will perform traditional cultural dances reflecting the diversity of Mexico.

Cultural dance troops, fraternities, sororities, and ballerinas! Come and dance for peace!

If your group would like to perform in this international event, contact: Patricia Ann Talley, Club Rotario (Rotary) Zihuatanejo, mailto:pattalley@imagine-mexico.com

Related Articles:

Students! Come to the International Youth Peace Conference in Zihuatanejo, Mexico – Or Participate in a Webinar

Zihuatanejo Plans Cultural Dance Festival for the Celebration of Peace – February 2-8, 2015

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Club Rotario le invita a la Fiesta de la Paz en Zihuatanejo, del 2 al 8 de febrero del 2015 – ¡Haga sus planes ya!

¡Estudiantes, padres, maestros, líderes cívicos, funcionarios de gobierno y los turistas! Usted está invitado a venir y participar en la quinta celebración anual de la Paz en Ixtapa Zihuatanejo, México, del 2 al 8 de febrero del 2015. La celebración incluirá la Regata de los Veleros Zihuatanejo, una Conferencia Internacional de Paz de la Juventud, nuestro Paseo Anual por la Paz, y un Festival Cultural de Danza – todo ello en beneficio de escuelas y becas estudiantiles. El tema de la celebración es el Derecho de los Pueblos a la Paz.

Desde el 2010, la comunidad de Ixtapa Zihuatanejo se ha esforzado por establecer un proceso de consolidación de paz sostenible para sus estudiantes. “Si queremos mantener la paz, debemos enseñarles a nuestros hijos sobre la paz, y demostrarlo a través de las acciones en nuestra vida diaria”, dice Gerarda González, presidenta del Club Rotario de Zihuatanejo que es uno de los patrocinadores del evento de paz.

Cada año, la comunidad organiza un programa de educación para la paz que inicia el 21 de septiembre, en el Día Internacional de la Paz de las Naciones Unidas, y continúa el siguiente mes de febrero con una gran celebración. ¡La celebración de 2015 será más grande y mejor que nunca!Peace Festival 2015

Celebración de la Paz en Ixtapa Zihuatanejo – del 2 al 8 de febrero del 2015

 Regata de los Veleros Zihuatanejo

Patrocinado por la Organización de Beneficencia “Por Los Niños”

La celebración comienza con la Regata de los Veleros Zihuatanejo – un festival de seis días que combina diversión, juegos y actividades en la playa para recaudar fondos para la educación de los niños más pobres de Zihuatanejo. Veleros vienen de lugares tan lejanos como Alaska y el Caribe a participar en lo que se está convirtiendo en uno de los principales eventos de vela de México.

El evento incluye carreras de veleros y lanchas, conciertos de música, día de playa para los niños, seminarios, concurso gastronómico de chile con carne (chili cook-off), ferias, regatas y excursiones escolares – todos para recaudar fondos para la educación. Durante el evento de 2014, los voluntarios recaudaron más de $834.000 pesos para construir escuelas y proporcionar becas para estudiantes de escasos recursos.

Vea el video del evento 2014:

Conferencia Internacional de la Paz de la Juventud

Coordinado por:

Universidad Autónoma de Guerrero, Zihuatanejo, y Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, EE.UU. en colaboración con el Club Rotario de Zihuatanejo UN Logo pnglarge

Durante la semana de la celebración, estudiantes de preparatoria y universidad de todo el mundo se reunirán con los estudiantes de México para una Conferencia Internacional de Paz de la Juventud. El tema es el Derecho de los Pueblos a la Paz. Este derecho puede ser identificado por varias capas: la paz social, la paz política, la paz espiritual, la paz económica, la paz de la familia y mucho más.

¡Estudiantes! ¿Cuál es su visión de la paz? ¿Cómo se puede contribuir a esa visión? Ven a compartir sus ilustraciones, fotos, poemas e ideas sobre formas de mantener la paz en sus vidas, sus escuelas, sus comunidades y nuestro planeta.

¡Padres, maestros y líderes de la comunidad! ¡Vengan a escuchar lo que nuestros jóvenes tienen que decir! Son nuestros futuros líderes.

Si a usted o a su escuela le gustaría hacer una presentación en la Conferencia Internacional de Jóvenes por la Paz, póngase en contacto con:

En México: Profesora Donaji Mendez Tello, Universidad Autónoma de Guerrero, Unidad de Turismo Zihuatanejo, mailto:mendezdon@hotmail.com.   Cel: (755) 557-4178.

En EE.UU. y Canadá: Dra. Talia Weltman-Cisneros en Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, EEUU. mailto:eg0885@wayne.edu

Caminata por la Paz y Festival Cultural de Danza

Coordinación: Instituto Municipal de la Cultura

Cultural Dancer from Guerrero

La Celebración de la Paz comienza el domingo, 8 de febrero del 2015, con un Paseo de la Paz junto a la playa y un festival cultural de danza. Bailarines provenientes de todo el estado de Guerrero presentarán bailes tradicionales que reflejan la diversidad de México.

¡Grupos de danza cultural, fraternidades, hermandades de mujeres, y bailarines y bailarinas! ¡Vengan a bailar por la paz!

Si a su grupo le gustaría participar en este evento internacional, póngase en contacto con: Patricia Ann Talley, Club Rotario de Zihuatanejo, mailto:pattalley@imagine-mexico.com.

Artículos relacionados:

Ixtapa Zihuatanejo Hotels and Beach Win Travel Awards for 2014

UAGro, Zihuatanejo’s Tourism University, Forms Exchange Programs with Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan, USA

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News from US Embassy in Mexico – Report on Town Hall Meeting in Zihuatanejo

By: Patricia Ann Talley, Managing Editor

The Embassy of the United States, located in the capital of Mexico City, is the government representative of all US citizens in Mexico. The Embassy provides emergency services, security and travel information, passports, reports of births or death, and a variety of other assistance for US citizens. Visit the website: U.S. Citizen Services | Embassy of the United States Mexico City, Mexico .

state-dept-logo

Ms. Maureen A. Smith, Deputy American Citizen Services Chief with the US Embassy in Mexico City, was in Zihuatanejo in June to meet with the Mexican Immigration Department, the Civil Protection Agency, the Red Cross, and other agencies that provide services to US citizens in the area.

Ms. Smith also held a Town Hall Meeting for US citizens in the area during the summer. Another Town Hall Meeting will be held later in the year, when more U.S. citizens will be in the area. The following is a report on the meeting that was held in June.

Travel Warnings: The US State Department issues Travel Warnings and other important announcements such as hurricane warnings or security messages. The Consular Agency Office that services the Zihuatanejo area is located in Acapulco, but travel by highway between Zihuatanejo and Acapulco is currently not advised by the U.S. government. Therefore, Ms. Smith suggested that citizens in the Zihuatanejo area should use the US Embassy in Mexico City, which can be reached by air.

Passport Renewals:  One of the main reasons for citizens to visit the US Embassy or Consular Agency Office is to renew passports, but that is only required every ten years. Whether you apply at the Embassy in Mexico City or at the Consular Agency Office in Acapulco, your passport will now be returned by courier mail; no return trip is required. Ms. Smith also advised U.S. citizens to phone ahead for appointments before traveling to either Mexico City or Acapulco to renew their passports.

Register with the US Embassy: US citizens in Mexico, both tourists and residents, are encouraged to register with the U.S. State Department in case of an emergency situation. Please register in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) at: https://step.state.gov/step/. STEP is the primary means that the U.S. Embassy uses to reach its citizens in Mexico. When you sign up, you will automatically receive email updates, hurricane warnings, security messages, etc.

Hurricane Season: Everyone is reminded that hurricane season is from May 15 to November 30. Take precaution. First, register with the US Embassy’s STEP program to receive travel updates and weather warnings. Other resources for weather information are:

Hurricane Season – Know Before You Go

Facebook Page: Civil Protection Agency in Guerrero

Climate and Earthquake Report – Government of Guerrero

Ixtapa Weather – AccuWeather Forecast for Guerrero Mexico

Some precautions you can take:

  • Pack an emergency supply kit. See: Build A Kit | Ready.gov
  • Keep extra bottled water and non-perishable food items on hand
  • Keep an up-to-date list of local emergency numbers and contact numbers
  • Place passports and other important documents in waterproof containers

Internal Revenue Service Reporting Changes: If you have a financial interest in or signature authority over a foreign financial account, including a bank account, brokerage account, mutual fund, trust, or other type of foreign financial account, exceeding certain thresholds, you may need to report this to the Internal Revenue Service. For complete information, see: Report of Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts (FBAR)

Related Articles:

US Travelers Encouraged to Register with Embassy in Mexico City -More Local Contacts Needed

US Consular in Ixtapa Closes -Information for US and Canadian Consular Agencies in Acapulco

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US Embassy Will Hold Town Hall Meeting in Zihuatanejo on June 20, 2014 – All US Citizens Invited

state-dept-logoMs. Maureen A. Smith, Deputy American Citizen Services Chief with the United States Embassy in Mexico City, will be the special guest at the luncheon meeting of Club Rotario (Rotary) of Zihuatanejo on Friday, June 20, at 3:00 p.m., at Catalina Beach Resort in Playa La Ropa. All American citizens are invited. The lunch cost is $130 pesos. Lunch reservations are required. Contact: mailto:info@imagine-mexico.com or phone 553-3308. A Town Hall Meeting will follow, starting at 4:30 p.m. (more…)

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Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Task Force Establishes “Vicente Guerrero Equality Award” in Honor of Mexico’s African-Indigenous President

The Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Task Force of Southfield, Michigan, USA, has recently established the “Vicente Guerrero Equality Award” to recognize individuals who work to create better harmony between the African-American and Mexican communities. President Vicente Guerrero of Mexico, who was of African-Indigenous descent, was a leader of freedom in the Americas.

The first recipients of this award are Dr. José Cuello and Dr. Talia Weltman-Cisneros, both from Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan. The award ceremony and dinner will take place on June 11, 2014.

The diversity award is in honor of President Vicente Guerrero (1782–1831), Mexico’s second president, and one of the country’s most important national heroes. Vicente Guerrero is referred to as the “George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, and Abraham Lincoln of Mexico,” indicating his great stature. He played a significant role in Mexico’s independence from Spain; he helped to write the new country’s constitution; and he abolished slavery during his presidential administration (1829), years before it was abolished in Canada (1833) and the USA (1865). The state of Guerrero, Mexico, is named in his honor.

Vicente Guerrero - blackPresident Vicente Guerrero of Mexico (1782-1831), who was of African-Indigenous descent, is one of the country’s most important national heroes. The state of Guerrero, Mexico, is named in his honor.

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Exhibit on Afro-Mexicans at Lear Corporation World Headquarters in United States for Month of May 2014

An educational exhibit about the history, culture and contributions of Afro-Mexican President Vicente Guerrero and other Afro-Mexicans will be on display for the employees of the Lear Corporation World Headquarters in Southfield, Michigan during the month of May 2014. This educational exhibit is part of the corporation’s diversity program.

Entitled, “Pathways to Freedom in the Americas: Shared Experiences Between Michigan, USA and Guerrero, Mexico,” the exhibit is in English and Spanish and uses video, maps, photographs, art, and music to depict a different aspect of the trans-Atlantic slave trade. It tells the story of African-American slaves escaping south to freedom in Mexico; African heritage as it continues to permeate Mexican culture—especially in the Costa Chica region of Guerrero; the migration of Mexicans to Michigan, and the culture as it has manifested in Southwest Detroit.

The “Pathways”educational exhibit and its website, www.FreedomPathways.org, were organized by the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Task Force, Inc. in Southfield, Michigan and funded by a grant from the Michigan Humanities Council, the MGM Grand-Detroit Hotel, and others.

This traveling exhibit premiered in November 2012 at the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History in Detroit, the world’s largest institution of its type, and has also been on display at Chrysler World Headquarters in Auburn Hills, Michigan. This unique exhibit about diversity is available for display in museums, universities, libraries or business institutions throughout Michigan. To date, the exhibit and website have been viewed by over 30,000 persons. Click to obtain a brochure about the exhibit:Pathways to Freedom Brochure – English.

Lear Corporation

The “Pathways to Freedom” exhibit will be on display for the employees of Lear Corporation World Headquarters in Southfield, Michigan, USA.

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Sister City Collingwood, Ontario, Canada Sends Greetings to Zihuatanejo!

By:  Patricia Ann Talley, MBA and Editor.

“What happened to Collingwood, Ontario?” That was the response from many Canadian residents in Ixtapa Zihuatanejo when we posted an article about sister cities that did not include the town. Zihuatanejo Builds Friendships and International Peace with its Sister Cities in the USA and Mexico.

Although there has not been much activity or interchange over the past few years, we’re happy to report that Collingwood is still a sister city to Zihuatanejo and communications have recently been restored. “We send warm greetings to the community of Zihuatanejo,” says Ms. Pamela Mc Dermid of the Collingwood/Zihuatanejo Sister City Committee.

Where is Collingwood, Ontario, Canada?

While we have many Canadian tourists and part-time residents in the Ixtapa Zihuatanejo area, many Zihuatanejo residents don’t know much about our Canadian neighbor.

Canada is the world’s second largest country by area. It has ten provinces (like states): Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Prince Edward Island, Quebec, and Saskatchewan. It also has three territories: Northwest Territories, Nunavut and Yukon.

The province of Ontario, Canada, is located in the Great Lakes area and borders the states of Michigan and Wisconsin in the United States.

Map of North America States

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Club Rotario (Rotary) of Zihuatanejo Sponsors the “Culture of Peace Program” and Hosts Diversity Presentation

Peace Through Service Rotary

With great pride, Mrs. Maria Gerarda González Montalba, President of Club Rotario (Rotary) of Zihuatanejo, recently announced the Club’s sponsorship of the “Culture of Peace Program” for Ixtapa Zihuatanejo. The peace program is now under the development and direction of the Club, in collaboration with the United Nations Education for Peace Team.

Other new sponsors of the “Culture of Peace Program” are Sister Cities of Zihuatanejo and Universidad Autónoma de Guerrero (UAGro), Zihuatanejo’s tourism university. The peace program in Zihuatanejo was initiated in 2010, with the help of the Detroit Renaissance District Peace Center in Southfield, Michigan and is an example of a “peace-building” program for other communities in the world to follow.  See:  DETROIT PEACE CENTER – IXTAPA ZIHUATANEJO PEACE PROGRAM – History and Requirements. (more…)

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Zihuatanejo Builds Friendships and International Peace with its Sister Cities in the USA and Mexico

During 2013, the Municipality of Zihuatanejo, Guerrero welcomed Bensenville, Illinois, USA and Uruapan, Michoacán, Mexico  to its family of Sister Cities that also includes Palm Desert, California, USA and Morelia, Michoacán, Mexico.  Collingwood, Ontario, Canada was formerly a Sister City but is no longer active.  The Sister Cities program is designed to promote international peace.

Sister Cities International (SCI) was created by USA President Dwight D. Eisenhower in 1956, following World War II.  President Eisenhower, who was a general in the conflict, wanted to leave a legacy of peace, not war.  He envisioned an organization that would promote peace and prosperity by creating bonds between people from different cities around the world.  Through these relationships, people of different cultures can build partnerships and international friendships to lessen the chance of new conflicts.  Peace is established through person-to-person “citizen diplomacy.”

Dr. Alfonso Cantú, a dentist in Zihuatanejo, is president of the Comité de Ciudades Hermanas Ixtapa Zihuatanejo (Sister City Committee) that includes sub-committees for: Education and Careers; Tourism; Economics; Ecology and Humanitarian Projects.

Comite de CH Ixtapa Zihuatanejo

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Breaking News! Zihuatanejo to Honor Five (5) Foreigners as “2013 Immigrants of the Year” at Reception on December 5th – Everyone is Invited

All foreign residents and tourists are invited to attend the 5th Annual International Migrant Day, hosted by the Department of Migration, on Thursday, December 5th at 5:00 p.m. at Barceló Resort in Ixtapa.  Entry is free.  There will be music, dancing, folklore and food provided by our local hotels and restaurants.  Dress in the attire of your country of origin.

Each year, the Zihuatanejo Migration Department recognizes a local immigrant for his or her contributions to the community.

This year, for the first time, the Migration Department will honor five (5) foreigners as the “2013 Immigrants of the Year”.   How wonderful! (more…)

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New “Tequila Pact” with China to Benefit Over 70,000 Mexican Families

The first bottles of Mexican tequila were shipped to Shanghai, China last month. China represents a golden opportunity for the Mexican tequila industry. According to Mexico’s Regulatory Council for Tequila (Consejo Regulador Del Tequila A.C. ) by 2015, China will be the world’s second largest importer of tequila, only behind the United States.

In June of this year, Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto and Chinese President Xi Jinping, signed a bilateral agreement wherein China reduced its trade restrictions on the import and sale of Mexican tequila.  As a result, Mexico is expected to export 10 million liters of tequila to China over the next 5 years.

Mexican Tequilla

Mexico is expected to export 10 million liters of tequila to China over the next 5 years.

The “Tequila Pact” was one of a series of trade agreements signed by the two presidents for China to permanently remove its trade barriers on various Mexican products, opening industries like food, energy, mining, tourism, infrastructure and education.

The new tequila trade agreement with China will benefit more than 70,000 Mexican families in 181 municipalities in the states of Jalisco, Nayarit, Guanajuato, Michoacán and Tamaulipas that comprise the Appellation of Origin.  These families make up the supply chain, distillery, packaging, transportation and other sectors necessary to deliver the product to its final destination.

Tequila is made from the heart (piña) of the agave plant.  Tequila is a beverage protected by an  Appellation of Origin.  In order for a product to bear the name “tequila,” the cultivation of agave and the production process of tequila must take place within a specified territory and in strict compliance with official international standards.

In addition to tequila and nectar, agave is rich in fiber and is used for a variety of different things including food, paper, yarn, shoes, ceilings for houses, clothes, and even pizza crust!

Take a look at this photo of agave production in Mexico, courtesy of Naked Pizza.

References:

http://mexicotoday.org/article/culture/china-expected-consume-10-million-liters-tequila-mexico-next-five-years

Academia Mexicana del Tequila, A.C.

Tequileros: Cámara Nacional de la Industria de Tequilla

http://www.cnnexpansion.com/economia/2013/06/04/china-mexico-inversion-pena-jinping

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Exhibit on President Vicente Guerrero and Afro-Mexicans Opens at Chrysler World Headquarters in USA

chrysler-logo-710x532An educational exhibit about the history, culture and contributions of Afro-Mexican President Vicente Guerrero and other Afro-Mexicans in the State of Guerrero opened on September 30, 2013 at Chrysler World Headquarters, 1000 Chrysler Drive, Auburn Hills, Michigan.

The exhibit will be on display for three (3) weeks as part of a state-wide tour of universities, schools, libraries and businesses in Michigan.

Pathways thumb logo

Entitled, “Pathways to Freedom in the Americas,” this educational exhibit and  website, www.FreedomPathways.org, were organized by the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Task Force, Inc. in Southfield, Michigan and funded by a grant from the Michigan Humanities Council, the MGM Grand-Detroit Hotel and others.  Since premiering in November 2012, the exhibit and website have been viewed by over 30,000 persons. (more…)

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US Consular in Ixtapa Closes / Information for US and Canadian Consular Agencies in Acapulco

Canada_and_USA_FlagAs a cost-saving measure the US State Department has reduced the number of Consular Agencies in Mexico from thirteen (13) to nine (9), resulting in the closure of the Consular Agency in Ixtapa, effective August 31, 2013. The US Consular Agency in Ixtapa had been in service since 1997.

Now all United States citizens in Guerrero, both Mexican residents and tourists, will be served by the Consular Agency in Acapulco or in any other Consulate Office in Mexico of choice.  The US Embassy in Mexico City is available 24 hours/day for emergencies.  Canadian citizens in Guerrero continue to be served by the Consular Agency in Acapulco and by the Canadian Embassy in Mexico City.

 General Services of United States and Canadian Consular Agencies

The United States and Canadian Consular Agencies accept passport applications and renewals and birth applications. Application must be made in person, but the documents may be delivered to you by carrier. The Consular Agencies provide Notary Services.  Most importantly, the Consular Agencies provide emergency services to foreign citizens and tourists in cases of destitution, arrest, illness, death or other special circumstances.  Consular Agencies do not provide visa services or information regarding visas. (more…)

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U.S. State Department Updates Travel Warnings for Mexico – List of Safe Cities

state-dept-logoThe U.S. State Department issues Travel Warnings to inform U.S. citizens about the overall security situation in various countries.  In July 2013, it updated its Travel Warning for Mexico.

Millions of U.S. citizens safely visit Mexico each year for study, tourism, and business, including more than 150,000 who cross the border every day.  According to the U.S. State Department, more than 20 million U.S. citizens visited Mexico in 2012. The Mexican government makes a considerable effort to protect U.S. citizens and other visitors to major tourist destinations, and there is no evidence that Transnational Criminal Organizations (TCOs) have targeted U.S. visitors and residents based on their nationality.  Resort areas and tourist destinations in Mexico generally do not see the levels of drug-related violence and crime that is reported in the border region and in areas along major trafficking routes.

No warnings or advisories are in effect for the following cities that are clear for travel:

Aguascalientes: There is no advisory in effect for daytime travel to the areas of the state that do not border Zacatecas; however, intercity travel at night is not recommended.

Baja California (South): Cabo San Lucas and La Paz are major cities/travel destinations in the state. No advisory is in effect.

Campeche: No advisory is in effect. Major cities/travel destinations are Campeche City, Calakmul and Edzna.

Chiapas:  No advisory is in effect. Major cities/travel destinations are San Cristobal de las Casas, Tuxtla Gutiérrez, Comitán, Tapachula, Palenque, Yaxchilán, Bonampak, Toniná, Sumidero Canyon, San Juan Chamula, Zinacantan

Guanajuato: No advisory is in effect.  Major cities/travel destinations are Guanajuato City, Leon, San Miguel de Allende

Guerrero*:  No travel advisories are in effect for the cities/travel destinations of Ixtapa Zihuatanejo, Acapulco and Taxco.  Flying into the coastal cities in southern Guerrero remains the preferred method of travel.  Defer non-essential travel by land between Acapulco and Ixtapa Zihuatanejo.

Jalisco:  No travel advisories are in effect for Guadalajara, Puerto Vallarta and Tequila.

Distrito Federal (Mexico City)*: No advisory is in effect for Mexico City (Polanco, Santa Fe, San Angel, Coyoacan, La Condesa, Chapultepec Park, Bascilica de Guadalupe, Historic Center, Zócalo, Xochimilco, Teotihuacan, Templo Mayor, Bellas Artes). Defer non-essential travel to the municipalities of Coacalco, Ecatepec, Nezahualcoyotl, La Paz, Valle del Chalco, Solidaridad, Chalco, and Ixtapaluca, which are eastern portions of the greater Mexico City metropolitan area, located just to the east of the Federal District of Mexico and Benito Juarez airport, unless traveling directly through the areas on major thoroughfares.

Michoacan*:  No travel advisories are in effect for the cities of Morelia and Lázaro Cardenas.  Defer non-essential travel to other parts of the state.

Nayarit*:  There is no recommendation against travel to Riviera Nayarit, Nuevo Vallarta, Punta de Mita, Sayulita and Bucerias or to principal highways in the southern portion of the state used to travel from Guadalajara to Puerto Vallarta.

Oaxaca: No advisory is in effect.  Major cities/travel destinations are Oaxaca City, Sierra Norte, Monte Alban, Mitla, Teotitlán del Valle, San Bartolo de Coyotepec, San Martin Tilcajete, Cuilápam de Guerrero, Tlacolula, Huatulco and Puerto Escondido.

Puebla: No advisory is in effect.  Major cities/travel destinations are Puebla City, San Andres Cholula and San Pedro Cholula.

Queretaro: No advisory is in effect.  Major cities/travel destinations are Queretaro City and Bernal.

Quintana Roo: No advisory is in effect.  Major cities/travel destinations are Cancun, Riviera Maya, Tulum, Playa del Carmen, Mayakoba, Akumal, Isla Mujeres, Puerto Aventuras, Cozumel, Sian Ka’an Biosphere Reserve and Xpu-Ha.

San Luis Potosi*: There are no travel advisories in effect for the city of San Luis Potosi. Defer non-essential travel to other parts of the state.

Sinaloa*:  There are no travel advisories in effect for Mazatlan*.  Defer non-essential travel to other parts of the state.

Tabasco: Villahermosa is a major city/travel destination in Tabasco.  No advisory is in effect.

Tlaxcala: No advisory is in effect.

Yucatan: Merida and Chichen Itza, Isla Holbox, Ek Balam, Valladolid, Izmal and Uxmal are major cities/travel destinations in Yucatan. No advisory is in effect.

*There are travel advisories in effect for some parts of the state.   For specific details, refer to the U.S. State Department International Travel Report for Mexico.  For general information about the country, see:  U.S. State Department Report on Mexico.

Related Articles:

The State of Guerrero is Full of Rich History, Culture and Ethnic Diversity | imagine-mexico.com

Ixtapa Zihuatanejo Receives Travel Awards for 2013! / New State and Federal Support

Is Ixtapa Zihuatanejo, Mexico Safe? | imagine-mexico.com

Escape to Enchanting Ixtapa Zihuatanejo | imagine-mexico.com

Condos Rentals and Small Hotels Offer Options for Visitors to Ixtapa Zihuatanejo

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U.S. Deportations Negatively Impact the State of Guerrero’s Economy

U.S. deportation of Mexicans back to the state of Guerrero, in which Ixtapa Zihuatanejo is located, will have a negative impact on the state’s economy due to the related reduction in foreign remittances. According to Netzahualcoyotl Bustamante Santin, Guerrero state migrant secretary, 45 percent of the state’s economic circulation comes from the remittances sent back by its citizens living in the United States.

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High Attendance at USA Exhibit on Afro-Mexicans in Guerrero / Zihuatanejo Professor Led Research

An educational exhibit is on display in Michigan, USA about the history, culture and contributions of Afro-Mexican President Vicente Guerrero and other Afro-Mexicans in Guerrero.  The exhibit opened in November 2012 at the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History in Detroit, Michigan, the world’s largest institution of its type, and was then on display at Marygrove College.  The exhibit will now tour universities, schools, libraries and business groups throughout the state.  During the first five (5) months of display, the exhibit was viewed by 25,030 persons and the website had 2,588 visits, demonstrating the high level of interest in the subject.

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Foreigners May Soon Find it Easier to Buy Property in Mexico

By:  Patricia Ann Talley, MBA and Editor.

Costa Grande 3Americans, Canadians and other foreign real estate investors may soon have an easier time purchasing private property in Mexico, like beachfront homes or condos.  In April, Mexico’s lower house of congress voted to ease long-standing restrictions against foreigners purchasing land along the beachfront or border areas of the country.  The measure, which passed 356-119 in the Chamber of Deputies, still needs approval from the Senate and a majority of the country’s 32 state legislatures to become law.

Currently, the Mexican Constitution prohibits non-Mexicans from directly owning land within 31 miles (50 kilometers) of the coast and 62 miles (100 kilometers) of the nation’s borders – called “restricted property.” Right now, if foreigners want to purchase a home or condo along the beachfront or border, they must set up a real estate trust with a bank, wherein the bank owns the property “in trust” for the purchasers; or, foreigners can set up a Mexican corporation and have that corporation own the land.  Either way, it involves a lot of “middle men” – banks, attorneys, accountants, etc. – who have profited from the current constitutional ban. (more…)

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Seek Graduate Studies Abroad, but Return and Give Your Professional Talents to Mexico!

Hugo BrentonBy: Hugo M. Breton, MBA and President of the University of Michigan Alumni Club of Mexico

It has been more than eight (8) years since I graduated from the university in the United States.  I attended the University of Michigan and attained a Masters in Business Administration and a Master of Engineering in Manufacturing.  Since graduating, I have spent these past years working in Operations Consulting and in financial institutions in Mexico. Although a long way from Ann Arbor, Michigan, I personally believe that here in Mexico is where I can contribute the most and where I can best leverage by educational experience.

My perspective is that graduate studies abroad greatly expand one’s skill set and business perspective, but it is best to bring and apply that knowledge back in one’s home country. There are three key questions that I believe surround this topic, which I briefly explore below.

Why graduate studies?

Although making a strong case for graduate studies may not be necessary, it is a reality that our demanding global economy requires highly trained professionals to keep pushing the (business) world forward. Most transnational companies have roles specifically designed for PhDs, MBAs and graduates from other Masters degrees. Over time, medium and small companies have also started to search for this talent, given the value of advanced technical knowledge or that within business functions. To the individual, the potential professional opportunities offer more challenging and rewarding roles.

In my case, since receiving my undergraduate degree, I had the objective of pursuing graduate studies to further my career. My dual degree from the Ross School of Business and the College of Engineering at the University of Michigan enabled me to deepen my knowledge in both disciplines.  Coursework provided me with specific tools, structure and problem solving abilities in multiple functions: Strategy, Finance, Marketing, Operations, Organizational Behavior and Environmental Technologies, among others. Furthermore, case work exposed me to best practices across industries around the globe. My studies included practical “hands-on” class projects along with an exciting summer internship. (more…)

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Foreigners Can Buy Real Estate in Mexico – Part 2

Editor’s Note: We continue this article on Real Estate to provide information to foreigners who are considering purchasing or renting a vacation or retirement home or condominium.  See Part 1: Foreigners Can Buy Real Estate in Mexico – Part 1

casa que ve al mar3Which is better – to own property through a Trust (“Fideicomiso”) or through a Mexican corporation? The manner in which you purchase the property – through forming a Mexican corporation or a Trust (“Fideicomiso”) – depends on its intended use.  If you are acquiring property solely for a private residence, it is easier to do this through a Fideicomiso (Trust) with a bank. If you are acquiring property for business purposes, for example, to operate vacation rentals, you may need to set-up a corporate entity to own the property and conduct the business activities.  Discuss the intended use of the property with the Notary so that he can best advise you.

What documentation is needed for the real estate transaction?  The notary public will need from the seller: 1. The deed; 2. Up-to-date tax receipts, water bills, subdivision (fraccionamiento) fees, and any other public utilities bill, paid up to the date of sale. The notary public will determine capital gains taxes through an official appraisal (Avaluo).

The capital gains tax, if any, is paid by the seller. However, through mutual agreement, it may be paid by the buyer. Make sure you know how much this will be; the Notary will inform you of the cost before the transaction, almost to the cent. Cash or money changes hands the minute the seller signs over the deed, usually in the notary public’s office. The buyer ordinarily pays notary fees incurred, which also must be paid when the title is signed over.

The process is not over yet — the Notary public must register the escritura in the Registro Público de la Propiedad (Public Registry of Properties). This should be done promptly, as the transaction is not valid until registered.  A normal time frame for this is around two weeks.

Property within Restricted Zones (50 kilometers from the beach or 100 kilometers from the border) must be held in a bank trust or you can form a Mexican corporation to own the property.  A bank Trust (“Fideicomiso”) is usually used when acquiring the property for personal use.

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“Ac Tah” the “Maya Walker” Predicts World Change

Both the Hopis and Mayans perceive that we are approaching the end of a World Age in 2012.  In both cases, however, the Hopi and Mayan elders do not prophesy that everything will come to an end –rather, this is a time of transition from one World Age into another.

The Hopis and Mayans tell us that we must make a choice of how we enter the future ahead.  Our moving through this time, with either resistance or acceptance, will determine whether the transition to a “new World Age” will happen with cataclysmic changes or with gradual peace and tranquility.  The belief is that Mother Earth as a living entity will transcend to another level or frequency or consciousness and a new and special era will begin.

Since 2008, “Ac Tah,” who is called the “Maya Walker” he has been walking through Mexico, carrying this message of his ancestors to awaken mankind.  Born in the state of Yucatan, he is a direct descendant of the Mayans.  He visited Zihuatanejo last year.

“Our grandparents told us about a big change that would happen.  And now we are faced with it,” said Ac Tah. It won’t happen again for another 135,000 years.  Those that are already aware, he said, can take responsibility to awaken others.  Humanity has had the longing to change for many centuries, he said. The changes will be to our lifestyle, and the system, so it’s more harmonious. Many have the mature mind to know that only unity will bring a big change. To put aside differences of race, philosophy, religion, social classes – we are allowed to be different.” (more…)

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Foreigners Can Buy Real Estate in Mexico – Part 1

The Public Notary in Mexico has a purpose totally different than Notaries in the United States and Canada.  In those countries, the Notary functions only to certify the signatures on documents. The Notary in Mexico, however, plays a more important role and is essential in transactions of goods and matters of business.  

In Mexico, the buying and selling of all types of real estate must be performed through a Notary.  The Notary is both a public servant and a lawyer with a private practice. The Notary can serve as a lawyer and consultant to assist in the real estate transaction.  The Notary can advise foreign investors of the alienability of the different types of property in Mexico and prepares the appropriate contracts and documentation for the property registration. The approval of the real estate documents with the Notary’s faith becomes an absolutely legal guarantee and with judicial security.   (more…)

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Exhibit on Afro Mexicans in Guerrero to Open in Detroit, Michigan in November 2012

An exhibition entitled, “Pathways to Freedom in the Americas: Shared Experiences between Michigan, U.S.A and Guerrero, Mexico” will open at the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History in Detroit, Michigan on November 15th and will be on display for four (4) months before traveling throughout the state.  “Pathways to Freedom in the Americas” is an exhibition of discoveries.

“Pathways to Freedom” presents a seldom publicized depiction of the trans-Atlantic slave trade, the unfamiliar story of fugitives from slavery in the United States taking the Underground Railroad south to Mexico, and the contributions made by the states of Michigan, U.S.A. and Guerrero, Mexico toward the abolition of slavery and the extension of freedom to all people.

The exhibition tells the story of Mexico’s 2nd President, Vicente Guerrero, for whom the state of Guerrero was named, who was of mixed African descent and who abolished slavery. Moreover, through maps, photographs, art, and music, the exhibition provides a glimpse into how African heritage permeates the Mexican culture, especially in the Costa Chica Region of Guerrero. (more…)

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The Influence of the Hispanic Vote in the 2012 U.S.A. Elections

In the 2006 U.S.A. congressional elections, Hispanics comprised 6% of the voters. By the 2010 congressional elections, that number had risen to 7%.  In the 2008 U.S.A. Presidential election, total voter turn-out increased by 5 million people. This increase included about 2 million more Hispanic voters, 2 million more Black voters and about 600,000 more Asian voters, while the number of non-Hispanic White voters remained statistically unchanged. (more…)

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