Subscribe to our mailing list

Category : Nature

The Christmas Flower – One of Mexico’s Exotic Treats!

Mexico is a beautiful country that is rich with a wide variety of plants and flowers. There are an estimated 20,000 – 30,000 different species of plants growing in Mexico, which is considered to be one of the most diverse nations in the world for flowers.

Flor de Noche Buena (Poinsettias) – One of the most popular Mexican flowers is the “Flor de Noche Buena” – the Christmas flower. These flowers come from Taxco, Guerrero. The ancient Aztecs called them “cuetlaxochitl.” In the USA, these flowers are called Poinsettias, named after Mexican Ambassador Joel Poinsett, who introduced them to the U.S.A. in 1828. The bright red petals and rich green foliage appear annually around Christmas time, making the poinsettia a decoration necessity every holiday season or winter wedding. The tree grows wild throughout the countryside.

Tithonias, also known as Mexican sunflowers, are members of the daisy family and date back to 3000 B.C. Mayan descendants called them “da nukha,” which means “big flower that looks at the sun god.”

Mexican sunflowers are annual plants that have orange-red blossoms and can grow up to 30 inches in height and up to 4 inches in diameter. Tithonias are good ornamental flowers and are a beautiful touch for special events and occasions.

Bird of Paradise. The name of this flower comes from its spectacular shape, which resembles a bird’s beak and head plumage. Bird of Paradise, also known as Crane flowers, is one of the most beautiful exotic flowers. The plant works well in formal arrangements and as a prominent feature of open tropical garden spaces. Bird of Paradise is frequently used for beachside weddings.

The Dahlia, which boasts over thirty-six species, has been the national flower of Mexico since 1963. The dahlia is known for its stunning and brightly colored petals, which come in red, orange, yellow, pink and white and grow from two to ten inches in diameter. Vivid colors and a wide variety set the dahlia apart from other native flowers.

 

For more information about the Ixtapa Zihuatanejo area, see: 

Local Attractions & Activities

 

 

 

Share

The Tigers of Guerrero

Tigers in Mexico? The tiger is a symbol of the state of Guerrero and is a part of its history and tradition. The Guerrero tiger is actually an ocelot, a wild cat that is native to Mexico, South America and the southwestern United States. The ocelot is a medium-sized spotted cat that is part of the leopard family. It looks similar to a bobcat.

The History

The Aztec god Tepeyollotl was depicted as a jaguar. He was the god of earthquakes, echoes, and jaguars. Tepeyollotl fertilized the earth, made the rain and produced abundance.

The Guerrero tiger is featured in local artwork and crafts.

The Tradition: “Tigrada de Guerrero”

The “Tigrada de Guerrero” is a carnival that originated in Chiapas, Guerrero that happens during the summer of every year. The women in the town make costumes for the men to dress as tigers and jaguars. They personify the deity of Tepeyollotl. The men and women parade through the city in hope to bring the blessing of fertile land, rain, and abundance.

Enjoy this video of the history and tradition of the “Tigers” of Guerrero!

La Tigrada de Chilapa

Una tradición que cada año llena de color las calles de Guerrero.

Posted by Cultura Colectiva Noticias on Saturday, April 8, 2017

Source: Cultural Colectiva Noticias, Facebook, https://www.facebook.com/culturacolectivanoticias/

There are many exciting activities and cultural events throughout the winter and spring seasons.  Check our Special Events Page each month.

Share

The Azulita Project: Surfers & Locals Work to Clean Plastic from the Beaches in Guerrero, Mexico

Plastic on our beaches! The beaches in Guerrero, Mexico, and others on our continent are under a “man-made attack” from plastic bottles! On the average, people in North America – Canada, the USA, and Mexico — use 2.5 million bottles of plastic every hour. If this rate continues, by 2050 our oceans will contain more plastic than fish!

Our oceans will soon have more plastic bottles than fish!

Plastic on our beaches! No one knows this better than the surfers who come from around the world to enjoy the warm beaches of the “Costa Grande” (Big Coast), a region that stretches along the Pacific Ocean from Acapulco to the northern border of the state of Guerrero, Mexico. Travelers are familiar with Ixtapa Zihuatanejo, Petatlán, Barra de Potosi, Troncones, Salidita, and other beach and surfing communities in this region.

The Azulita Project, operated by surfers and volunteer residents, has created a plastic recycling program that generates profits for people who pick up and clean plastic bottles from the beaches. The organization buys plastic at a premium price of $2.50 pesos per kilo (about $0.15 USD) from local residents who are encouraged to collect and recycle plastic waste rather than burning it or tossing it into unmaintained open trash piles.

Local families can earn money from cleaning up plastic and selling it to the Azulita Project.

The Azulita Project is working to create a replicable, sustainable business model that provides economic incentives and social support to combat one of today’s most serious environmental threats: marine plastic pollution.

The Azulita Project also conducts educational programs about recycling and sustainable tourism. This photo is from a presentation at the Universidad Tecnológica de la Cost Grande in Petatlán, Guerrero, about 45 minutes south of Zihuatanejo.

Since the start of Azulita Project’s innovative purchasing and education programs, recycling participation has dramatically increased and plastic pollution has noticeably decreased in Guerrero’s Costa Grande region. Project team members purchase plastic waste from residents and then clean, process, and compress the plastic at Azulita’s plastic collection facility in Los Llanos, Guerrero. When the team has processed and baled 10 to 15 tons of plastic, it is shipped and sold to a recycling facility near Guadalajara, Mexico.

The plastic is processed at Azulita’s collection facility and then shipped and sold to a recycling company.

See this short film we produced with @OutsideTV with former longboarding world champion Kristy Murphy as she explores surf, community, organic farming, and the Azulita recycling project.

What you can do to help!

The plastic buy-back program and operational expenses cost more than the income generated by selling the processed waste plastic. The Azulita Project relies on significant donations and sponsorships from private donors and corporate partners to maintain and grow its education programs and plastic collection facility.

The Azulita Project is very grateful for donations and welcomes questions about other ways to get involved! Go to: http://www.azulitaproject.org/

Related Articles:

Imagine-Mexico.com/Clean Beach Rules for Ixtapa Zihuatanejo, Guerrero

Imagine-Mexico.com/”Hang 10” –The Thrill of Surfing in Ixtapa Zihuatanejo

Imagine-Mexico.com/Experience the Thrill of Surfing in Troncones Beach, Mexico –Enjoy the Videos

Imagine-Mexico.com/Transforming Our World -The United Nations Agenda for Sustainable Development to 2030

For more information about Ixtapa Zihuatanejo and the surrounding areas, see:

Hotels & Real Estate

Local Attractions & Activities

Restaurants & Menus

Shops & Services

 

Share

“Purple” Naturally Comes from Snails – It’s Still Made That Way in Mexico!

Do you know that the color purple originally comes from snails? And in Mexico, the color purple is still produced in that manner today and used in the country’s traditional textile industry.

For centuries, in countries and societies all around the world, the color purple has been related to royalty, power, and wealth. That was because of the rarity and cost of the dye originally used to produce it. A dye that is naturally found only in snails!

In Europe, traditionally only the Royals wore the color purple. In fact, Queen Elizabeth I forbade anyone except close members of the royal family to wear it. Purple was associated with wealth and power because it was so expensive to produce. The purple dye was obtained from snails that lived in the Mediterranean Sea; they were caught and killed to extract the fluid from their bodies.

Anatomy of a snail. In Europe, snails were caught and killed to extract the purple dye from their bodies.

When the Spanish arrived in the Americas, they were impressed by the wide use of the color purple in the fabrics of the indigenous people. The indigenous American people obtained the dye from snails in the Pacific, but, they did not kill the snails as the Europeans did. They extracted the dye with yarn and returned the snails to the sea. The people allowed the snails to rest during their reproductive cycles to conserve the species. This is a natural way.

In Europe, snails were killed to obtain their purple dye. In the Americas, indigenous people extracted the liquid dye with yarn and returned the snails to the sea to conserve the species.

Purple dye was extracted in this traditional, natural way in Mexico until 1980, when a foreign-owned company started to harvest and exploit the snails, greatly reducing their numbers. It was then decreed that foreigners are forbidden to kill snails, and only Mexican people can produce the dye that is derived from them.

In Mexico, the color purple continues to be obtained in the traditional, natural way by extracting it from snails without killing them. The color is used in textiles and traditional clothes.

In 1856, William Henry Perkin, a young college student at the Royal College of Chemistry in London, England, discovered a way to make synthetic purple. The color was then mass produced and commercialized around the world.

References:

https://www.facebook.com/resistenciatenochtitlan/videos/1404602826276681/

Facebook: Resistencia Tenochtitlan

Related Articles:

Imagine-Mexico.com/Mexican Culture a Real World Heritage

For more information about Ixtapa Zihuatanejo and the surrounding areas, see:

Hotels & Real Estate

Local Attractions & Activities

Restaurants & Menus

Shops & Services

 

 

 

Share

Puppies & Kittens in Ixtapa Zihuatanejo Need Our Help!

By: Jimena Rodríguez, Animal Defense and Rescue Foundation of Zihuatanejo.

Animals need help too! Sadly, thousands of puppies and kittens are born every day and when these figures are compared to the number of humans born every day it becomes obvious that there will never be a sufficient number of homes for dogs and cats.  Too many of them live their lives unwanted in any place or by any human being.

It’s estimated that 30% of the dogs in Mexico have an owner, 30% are considered “of the neighborhood” (they live in the streets but are fed regularly and cared for by a group of people), and the remaining 40% live unattended in the streets.

Many owners of companion animals have been pressured by a neighbor or a family member, desperate to rid themselves of the responsibility of unwanted litters of pets. These animals were not acquired by choice, and so it isn’t surprising that their owners abandon them, or give them away or simply have them living on a roof or on a patio, chained and living without shelter under harsh climatic conditions. In many cases, even the bare necessities aren’t covered (food, shelter, veterinary care), let alone love and respect.

In the majority of the cases, it has been determined that the principal cause of abandonment is not impulse buying, but rather chance matings which produce unwanted litters when owners fail to assume responsible caretaking, thinking their animals have the same needs as a human to produce offspring.

The only method that is 100% effective in controlling the reproduction of dogs and cats is assuring that the animals are surgically sterilized by a professional veterinarian so that they will no longer have the ability to reproduce.

Defensa y Rescate Animal (Animal Defense and Rescue) is a group of activists united by their love for animals. Currently, we don’t have a physical shelter, but the animals we have in adoption are being fostered in our homes waiting for the opportunity to find a permanent family.

Any work such as ours requires funds to be carried out, and for this reason, our help is essential in order to move forward with this important project to benefit the animals we bring into our care and the environment.

Please be a part of this expanding wave of Love by contributing a donation to help us carry out Spay/Neuter Clinics on a much larger scale.

Our intention is to attack this problem of stray overpopulation as a disorder of our society through multiple-disciplinary work consisting of:

Awareness Campaigns

Because we know that the origin of many negative issues is ignorance. With your help, we would be capable of carrying out the most important task in the fight against cruelty to animals – education. We want to provide environmental education for children between the ages of 6 and 14 in both public and private schools with the objective of preparing future environmental activists and at the same time a continuing network of help for animals.

Spay/Neuter Clinics

One of the best strategies to eradicate animal suffering is through the procedure of sterilization. Our goal is to offer free clinics to rural communities in close proximity to our city because, in those areas, where there are no sterilization services in place, the residents themselves regulate the population of unwanted dogs and cats in the worst manner: killing the females and newborns.  Please help us end these injustices.

Rescue and Adoption Campaigns

To rescue and rehabilitate, we need to be able to cover the expenses of veterinary care, food, curative and cleaning supplies.

Health Campaigns

With this campaign, our goal is to offer health services such as vaccinations and internal and external medicines for parasites to low-income communities where such care currently doesn’t exist.

You can help!

Please have compassion for these little animals. You can help in many ways – adopt one; donate money, food, medical supplies, or animal care products. Please go to our website to learn more. http://www.defensayrescateanimal.org/

Or, visit us on Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/DefensayRescateAnimal/

For more information about Ixtapa Zihuatanejo and the surrounding areas, see:

Hotels & Real Estate

Local Attractions & Activities

Restaurants & Menus

Shops & Services

Share

It’s Hurricane Season – Take These Actions to Protect Your Life and Family!

Hurricane season in the tropics is from May 15th to November 30th. It is important to be informed about what to do before, during and after a hurricane. Take these steps to protect your life and your family! 1

Before a hurricane:

Talk to your family and friends to organize a civil protection plan taking into account the following measures:

  • Determine a place to meet if you get separated because of a hurricane.
  • If your house is fragile (reed, palapa, adobe, straw or similar materials), investigate a temporary shelter (school, church or city hall) to relocate.
  • Make necessary repairs to roofs, windows and walls to prevent further damage.
  • Provide transportation if you have family or elderly people.

Please have the following items for an emergency:

  • First aid kit
  • Radio and flashlight with spare parts
  • Purified water in covered containers
  • Canned food (tuna, sardines, beans, milk
  • Personal documents (birth, marriage, immigration documents, etc.) stored in plastic bag

During a hurricane:

Stay home if it is safe or move to the hostel as planned. If authorities recommend that you evacuate the area and/or your home — do not hesitate! Go to safety!

If you can stay at home:

  • Stay calm.
  • Keep your battery-operated radio on for information and instructions from official sources.
  • Close doors and windows, protecting the glass inside with tape in the form of X. Curtains will NOT protect you from any splintering glass.
  • Secure loose objects (pots, garbage cans, tools, etc.).
  • Have warm clothing and waterproof clothing available.
  • Cover appliances or objects that could be damaged or broken with water with plastic bags.
  • Constantly check the water level near your home.

If you move to a temporary shelter:

Secure your home and take all necessities and important documents with you.

  • Remain calm and reassure your family.
  • Listen to your battery-powered radio for information or instructions for the hurricane.
  • Unplug all appliances and power switches.
  • Shut off the gas and water.
  • Do not light candles.
  • Attend to children, the elderly and sick people who are with you.
  • Do not leave until authorities say it ended the danger

Temporary Shelters

The main temporary shelters available in Zihuatanejo are:

– Municipal Auditorium

– CONALEP

– Elementary School John N. Alvarez

– Luis Guevara Ramírez School

Alternate Shelters:

– Esc Prim Lt. Fed. José Azueta (Los Almendros)

– Esc Prim Fed Cuauhtémoc (El Zarco)

– Esc Prim Miguel Hidalgo (San Miguelito)

– Redemption Prim Tropical Escape (San Jose Ixtapa)

– Esc Prim Miguel Aleman (New Town)

– Esc Prim Cuauhtémoc (San Jose Ixtapa)

– Esc Prim Juan Peztalozzi (The Posquelite)

– Esc Vicente Guerrero (Pantla)

– Esc Emiliano Zapata (The Nitrate)

– Esc Leona Vicario (The Coacoyul)

– Esc Josefa Ortiz de Domínguez (The Achotes)

– Matiana Escape Orb (Agua de Correa)

– Esc Technical Sec 52 (The Dam)

– Esc Technical Sec 186 (Infonavit the Hujal)

– Esc Sec Eva Samano de Lopez Mateo (Downtown)

– High 5 (Col. Cuauhtemoc) – 13 Preparatory UAG (Col. Sports)

After a hurricane:

  1. Stay calm.
  1. Follow the instructions issued by the authorities through the media. If your home is in the affected area, you cannot return to it until authorities indicate.
  1. If there are injuries, gas leaks or any kind of risk, report it immediately to the emergency services.
  1. Take care that your food is clean, do not eat anything raw or dubious.
  1. Drink only purified or boiled water.
  1. Thoroughly clean up any spilled medicines, toxic or flammable substances.
  1. Carefully inspect your home to make sure there is no danger.
  1. Keep off the gas, light and water to ensure no leakage and no danger of short circuit.
  1. Make sure your appliances are dry before connecting.
  1. Do not spread rumors.
  1. Clean up any water to prevent mosquito infestations.
  1. If you live on hillsides or mountain slopes, be careful of landslides.
  1. Keep warm and away from the disaster areas.
  1. Avoid touching or stepping on cables.
  1. Withdraw from buildings, trees and poles in danger of falling.

If a family member is missing, DO NOT GO OUT TO GET THEM – it can be dangerous. Alert the authorities!

Emergency Numbers: You can call 911

CIVIL AND FIRE PROTECTION

554-75-51 & 554-34-53

MUNICIPAL PUBLIC SAFETY

554-20-40

MEXICAN RED CROSS

065

GENERAL HOSPITAL

554-36-50 & 554-34-36

I.M.S.S.

554-48-22

MUNICIPAL HEALTH SERVICES

554-20-88 & 554-32-30

MILITARY NAVAL HOSPITAL

553-04-99

CIVIL PROTECTION AGENCY

Protección Civil Guerrero

Facebook: Civil Protection Agency

YOUR PARTICIPATION IS YOUR PROTECTION!

References:

  1. Translated from: http://ixtapayzihuatanejo.com/actividad/huracanes/

For more information about the Ixtapa Zihuatanejo area, see:

Hotels & Real Estate

Local Attractions & Activities

Restaurants & Menus

Shops & Services

 

Share

“Our Oceans, Our Future” – June is International Ocean Month

June 8 is International Ocean Day, and the month is dedicated to conserving our world’s oceans. The theme for 2017 is “Our Oceans, Our Future.” The oceans cover about two-thirds of the surface of the Earth and are the very foundations of life. They generate most of the oxygen we breathe, absorb a large share of carbon dioxide emissions, provide food and nutrients, regulate climate, and are important economically for countries that rely on tourism, fishing and other marine resources for income, and serve as the backbone of international trade.

(Editor’s Note: This information is taken from the United Nations Ocean’s Day website. For all UN activities and events, go to http://www.un.org/en/events/oceansday/.)

Unfortunately, human pressures, including overexploitation, illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing, destructive fishing, as well as unsustainable aquaculture practices, marine pollution, habitat destruction, alien species, climate change and ocean acidification are taking a significant toll on the world’s oceans and seas.

Why celebrate World Oceans Day?

  • To remind everyone of the major role the oceans have in everyday life. They are the lungs of our planet, providing most of the oxygen we breathe.
  • To inform the public of the impact of human actions on the ocean.
  • To develop a worldwide movement of citizens for the ocean.
  • To mobilize and unite the world’s population on a project for the sustainable management of the world’s oceans. They are a major source of food and medicines and a critical part of the biosphere.
  • To celebrate together the beauty, the wealth and the promise of the ocean.

Wherever you live, in Zihuatanejo or in any waterfront area, now is the time to take action to preserve our oceans! Here are some things you can do.

In the Ixtapa Zihuatanejo area, residents and tourists are urged to respect and follow the clean beach rules established by the municipal government and the Clean Beach Committee.

Beach Rules in Ixtapa Zihuatanejo:

  • Glass and Styrofoam are not permitted.
  • No dogs, pets, or horses
  • No camping
  • No fires on the beach
  • No automotive vehicles or 4-wheel vehicles
  • Do not remove the natural flowers and vegetation
  • Do not disturb the natural wildlife

Ixtapa Zihuatanejo also has a Clean Beach Certification Program to promote the conservation of natural resources. The public can volunteer and get involved.

The clean beach program consists of beach and sand cleaning, environmental education, cleaning of riverbeds and wastelands, a sea turtle and wildlife conservation program, beach trash containers and signage, zoning of activities with buoys and surveillance of aquatic sports, and construction and maintenance of ramps for disabled visitors.

In your home town, there are many things that you can do to help preserve our oceans. The International Holistic Tourism Education Centre has a list of actions that you can take.

  1. Keep pollution out of all rivers, lakes, and seaways that enter the ocean.
  2. Collect and dispose safely all garbage found on beaches, and prevent it from returning to the ocean.
  3. Prevent all plastics from reaching waterways, especially balloons and plastic bags.
  4. Preserve all fish species in the ocean.
  5. Eat fish only if it is harvested in a sustainable way.
  6. Throw back small fish that you might catch.
  7. Ask fishermen what they are doing to protect the ocean.
  8. Protect coral reefs when you swim near them.
  9. Leave all live species you find in rock pools where they are.
  10. Protect sand dunes, and replant under supervision of knowledgeable people.
  11. Maintain awareness that carbon dioxide emissions into the atmosphere are the prime cause of the ocean becoming less alkaline and of its species dying off.
  12. Ask all resorts and cruise liners how they are protecting the ocean.
  13. Enjoy recreational activities that are non-polluting near or on the ocean.
  14. Work with local politicians and the media to share what has been achieved.
  15. Create methods of tracking, identifying, and monitoring ocean species with local marine and ocean specialists.

For more information about Ixtapa Zihuatanejo and the surrounding area, see:

Hotels & Real Estate

Local Attractions & Activities

Restaurants & Menus

Shops & Services

Share

American Crocodiles in Ixtapa – Ex-pats or Natives?

By: Barbara Erickson.

American Crocodiles in Ixtapa – Ex-pats or Natives? The crocodile first appeared in the fossil record in the Paleocene – 65 million years ago. The American Crocodile, Crocodylus acutus, which we find here in Ixtapa, appeared in Latin American fossil records from the Plio-Pleistocene era, some 2 million years ago. Native it is! The crocs among us today qualify as living dinosaurs.

To see these pre-historic carnivorous reptiles, up close – yet safely, head to the bridge near Playa Linda and walk out on the viewing platform. This species is one of the largest of the world’s crocodiles, and is considered in danger of extinction due to human predication and loss of habitat. When you see the numbers of crocs in Ixtapa you may find this hard to believe. There are no reliable census studies of crocodiles in Mexico, and Ixtapa authorities only recently discovered that tourists enjoy getting a look at these amazing creatures.

Crocodiles are easily distinguished from their more aggressive cousins the alligators by their grayish green color, their narrow tapered triangular snout, and when their mouths are closed, their exposed fourth tooth. They prefer coastal, brackish, and salt-water habitats while alligators prefer fresh water. They tend to flee rather than fight when confronted by their only predator – man.

Distribution of the American Crocodile

American Crocs are opportunistic hunters. They remain completely motionless, low in the water and when prey is close they attack – grabbing the animal and drowning it with a maneuver referred to as the “death roll.” This feeding mechanism for large prey is unique in the animal kingdom. For small prey, such as fish or birds, they simply swallow the prey whole. Once the crocodile has drowned its large prey, it will hold on to one body part and roll its body until the affected part is completely twisted off, thereby creating a bite-size chunk that is easily ingested. If the prey is too large to be consumed in one sitting, it is not uncommon for the crocodile to take it to a hiding place, usually underneath an overhanging bank or submerged log, and consume it later. In order to attract fish for their meal, they may regurgitate bits of food. No wonder it sometimes smells a bit “strong” at the bridge!

Although when you see the crocs, they will be lazing around, they are also able to “high walk” at speeds up to 10 miles an hour! They can swim up to 20 miles an hour for short distances. Large crocodiles can survive for long periods of time between meals due to their very efficient metabolism. Crocodiles have brains and hearts that are more advanced than any other living reptile. Mother crocodiles care for their young after hatching by providing transportation from the nest to the nearest water source in their mouths and continue to attend to them for up to four weeks after hatching.

American Crocodiles never stop growing and Mexican crocs have measured in at 15 feet in length, with 20 footers recorded in Central America. They live up to seventy years in the wild.

Today crocodiles are farmed in Mexico for their meat and hides. The meat has no fat and little actual flavor with a lobster like texture so it should be a good protein option for many – if people would add it to their diets!

Travel Tip: depending on the season of your visit, the bridge at Playa Linda is a great place to see herons, egrets and roseate spoonbills. Don’t forget to walk across the road to the other side of the bridge for more birding.

For more information about Ixtapa Zihuatanejo and surrounding areas, see:

Hotels & Real Estate

Local Attractions & Activities

Restaurants & Menus

Shops & Services

Share

Horseback Riding Along the Beaches of Ixtapa Zihuatanejo

By: Elisabeth Ashe; Photos by: Margaret Reid*

Get up from in front of the pool! Want to ride?

For many people, vacations in a tropical paradise like Zihuatanejo conjure visions of all inclusive stays at luxurious resorts. Whether you lie on the beach or by the pool all day, drink in hand and soaking up glorious rays, or hover over the buffet table, chances are that after a few days of excess, you may find yourself looking for something to do to wear off all that food and drink.

Horseback riding has become one of the preferred methods of combining, fun, sun and exercise! And you get to connect with nature.

There are three beaches in the Ixtapa Zihuatanejo area that offer horseback riding – Playa Larga, Barra de Potosi and Troncones. I chose Playa Larga Ranch Risquel, a family run business that has a full complement of horses to choose from 7 days a week, either early morning or sunset rides.

After picking the horse best suited for your ability, from the raw beginner to the more experienced, a typical ride starts on the beach and along the surf. If you’re lucky, sometimes you will see dolphins  or whales, depending on the time of year.

After that, the tour will head inland, past a beautiful lagoon filled with white cranes and perhaps a crocodile or two, where your guide will take your picture against the lush green backdrop. Then it’s into the coconut groves and through the jungle, before returning via the beach towards the stables. Usually, you will be able to book a ride by showing up at the stables, or you can arrange for transportation and rides through the tour operator in your hotel.

It’s sure to be one of the best aspects of your vacation!

* About the Author and Photographer: Both of these women are Canadian.

Elisabeth Ashe has been coming to Zihuatanejo since 1995. “Zihuatanejo inspires me,” she says. “It is here where I come to write, as no other place gets my creative juices flowing the way Z does.” When she back in Canada she spends her time with her greatest passion, her horse Guppy, and owns and operates a Bed & Breakfast just north of Toronto.

Margaret Reid is a retired Canadian military photographer who now spends half her year in Zihuatanejo and the other in Victoria, BC. She loves to capture the beauty of BC and the culture and the children in Mexico and to share the photos with others to enjoy.

For more information about the Ixtapa Zihuatanejo area, see:

Hotels & Real Estate

Local Attractions & Activities

Restaurants & Menus

Shops & Services

Share

Humpback Whales – These “Snow Birds” Visit Ixtapa Zihuatanejo Every Year

Humpback Whale BreachingBy: Barbara Erickson.

When it’s cold up north and the “snow bird” tourists start to arrive in Ixtapa Zihuatanejo, it means that the whales are not far behind. Humpback whales are famous for their long complex songs and for their acrobatic displays; breaching, jumping and spy-hoping, delighting all who have the good fortune to observe them. They are known as Humpbacks (Megaptera novaeangliae), from the shape of their backs when they dive.

During the northern winter and early spring, many Humpbacks play off the coast of the Ixtapa Zihuatanejo area. They are part of a large stock of whales that travel between Northern California, Oregon and Washington states coming south each season. They are thought to number around 1,250 individuals. And just like “snow birds,” more come south each year. This stock is generally considered to be growing.

From: VallartaSource.com

From: VallartaSource.com

Like many other local winter visitors, Humpbacks are social creatures. They travel in pods, large loose social groups that vary widely from week to week. Only mothers and calves stick close together for the winter season. Humpbacks sometimes hunt cooperatively too; rounding up massive amounts of prey in a technique called “bubble net feeding”. The hunting members of a pod form a large circle and then blow a wall of bubbles as they swim to the surface in a spiral path. The cylindrical wall of bubbles makes the trapped prey swim to the surface, where the whales eat them.

Humpbacks are seasonal feeders; which means that they are not usually eating while they stay in the warm waters off the Guerrero coast. They are baleen whales or filter feeders that eat tiny crustaceans, krill, plankton, and small fish, consuming up to 5,500 pounds a day in two feedings! They make the most of their summer by feeding heavily in the rich waters of the northern coasts and actually take a vacation from hunting and feeding when they come south.

Humpback WhaleHumpbacks come in a variety of color themes, ranging from black to grey to white to mottled and have distinctive markings on their tails and flukes, one of the way scientists who study the various groups (stocks) can identify individuals. Adult Humpbacks weigh as much as 6,000 to 15,000 pounds and the females out weigh the males. They swim by moving their tails up and down (fish swim by moving theirs from side to side) and swim about 3 to 5 miles an hour unless they are in danger – then they can burst into speed up to 15 miles an hour. When you are watching these beautiful winter visitors, you can often see them playing close to shore and then, in the blink of an eye, they are off and gone. Perhaps a friend has sent out a song to join up, or perhaps they are just ready to move on.

You can look for Humpbacks by taking a boat tour out of Barra de Potosi or Zihuatanejo, or often see their spouts from local beaches. Keep on the lookout and you will be rewarded with sightings!

For more information about the Ixtapa Zihuatanejo area, see:

Hotels & Real Estate

Local Attractions & Activities

Restaurants & Menus

Shops & Services

Share

Every Night is an Adventure to Save the Turtles!

By: Damaris Marin-Smith, President, Campamento Tortuguero Ayotlcalli A.C.

Save our turtles! Some nights are bright, with a sky full of stars. The splendor of the Milky Way, the whisper of the waves, and the sounds of the tropical night are a treat to your senses. You can identify every phase of the moon on a clear night. Unexpected shooting stars, in the blink of an eye, falling in the silver-dark ocean make you hold your breath, with your eyes wide open. They are fast. Don’t miss them!

On pitch black nights, look for the turtles or their tracks.

Some nights are windy, stormy, or both. There are high tides. These are ideal conditions for the turtles to come on-shore to lay their eggs because their tracks will vanish. Predators will have a hard time finding the precious nest full of soft sea turtle eggs.

Every night is another adventure for Team “Ayotlcalli”. The volunteers are committed to protect the three species of marine turtles that nest in the area of Playa Blanca and Playa Larga in Zihuatanejo, Mexico. The Black turtle, Olive Riddley, and the magnificent Leatherback have chosen this beautiful zone in the Pacific Coast to reproduce. Unfortunately, predators, including human beings are contributing to the rapid extinction of these species that have survived since the dinosaur’s era.

10418214_367974976694140_918526512786923015_n

Campamento Tortuguero Ayotlcalli is a non-profit organization with local and international volunteers who take turns to make night runs searching for marine turtle nests. Once found, the eggs are transported into a protected area. After several days, hatchlings are released into the ocean. We hope that years later, females will come back to continue the circle of life. Volunteers also organize visits to local schools to educate children about how to protect sea turtles.

During hatchling releases, international and local guests gather under a palapa. Within the shade and with a fresh ocean breeze visitors will learn about scientific facts. They will also learn about different ways to help, emphasizing on poaching and ocean pollution, including plastic bags, which can be deadly to turtles when dumped into the waters.

Campamento Tortuguero Ayotlcalli survives thanks to donations, and sale of products at Ecotianguis Zanka, held in front of the museum in Zihuatanejo every Saturday. Most of the products are crafts hand-made by volunteers and local native artisans.

Turtle project sales at Ecotianguis

This conservation project survives thanks to donations and the sale of products at “Ecotianguis Zanka,” held in front of the museum in Zihuatanejo every Saturday.

If you plan to visit Ixtapa Zihuatanejo, come to Playa Blanca to enjoy an amazing view, a breathtaking sunset and to learn about our program. Follow “Campamento Tortuguero Ayotlcalli A.C” on facebook, twitter and Instagram.

See this wonderful video about this project:

For more information about the Ixtapa Zihuatanejo area, see:

Hotels & Real Estate

Local Attractions & Activities

Restaurants & Menus

Shops & Services

Share

Clean Beach Rules for Ixtapa Zihuatanejo, Guerrero

Everyone loves the beach! But, there are rules that govern its use. In the Ixtapa Zihuatanejo area, residents and tourists are urged to respect and follow the clean beach rules established by the municipal government and the Clean Beach Committee.

Beach Rules in Ixtapa Zihuatanejo

  • Glass and Styrofoam are not permitted.
  • No dogs, pets, or horses
  • No camping
  • No fires on the beach
  • No automotive vehicles or 4-wheel vehicles
  • Do not remove the natural flowers and vegetation
  • Do not disturb the natural wildlife

Beach trash cans

Ixtapa Zihuatanejo also has a Clean Beach Certification Program to promote the conservation of natural resources. The public can volunteer and get involved.

The clean beach program consists of beach and sand cleaning, environmental education, cleaning of riverbeds and wastelands, a sea turtle and wildlife conservation program, beach trash containers and signage, zoning of activities with buoys and surveillance of aquatic sports, and construction and maintenance of ramps for disabled visitors.

Beach cleaning

Environment Education

In your home town, there are many things that you can do to help preserve our oceans. The International Holistic Tourism Education Centre has a list of actions that you can take.

  1. Keep pollution out of all rivers, lakes, and seaways that enter the ocean.
  2. Collect and dispose safely all garbage found on beaches, and prevent it from returning to the ocean.
  3. Prevent all plastics from reaching waterways, especially balloons and plastic bags.
  4. Preserve all fish species in the ocean.
  5. Eat fish only if it is harvested in a sustainable way.
  6. Throw back small fish that you might catch.
  7. Ask fishermen what they are doing to protect the ocean.
  8. Protect coral reefs when you swim near them.
  9. Leave all live species you find in rock pools where they are.
  10. Protect sand dunes, and replant under supervision of knowledgeable people.
  11. Maintain awareness that carbon dioxide emissions into the atmosphere are the prime cause of the ocean becoming less alkaline and of its species dying off.
  12. Ask all resorts and cruise liners how they are protecting the ocean.
  13. Enjoy recreational activities that are non-polluting near or on the ocean.
  14. Work with local politicians and the media to share what has been achieved.
  15. Create methods of tracking, identifying, and monitoring ocean species with local marine and ocean specialists.

Take this pledge to conserve our oceans, and use it: OceanDedication2

For more information about Ixtapa Zihuatanejo and the surrounding area, see:

Hotels & Real Estate

Local Attractions & Activities

Restaurants & Menus

Shops & Services

Share

The “King of Kings” Statue – An Expression of Faith by the People of Ixtapa Zihuatanejo

King of Kings StatueSubmerged below the blue ocean waters of Las Gatas Beach in Zihuatanejo is a bronze statue of Christ – The King of Kings, “El Rey de Reyes.” This statue, which weighs about a ton and a half and is four meters in height, is an expression of faith of the people in the local area.

This statue project began back in 2006, when a call was made to the public to donate keys to be used to form the heart of the Jesus sculpture. Then, this bigger-than-life statute was caste in Acapulco by sculptor Marco Antonio Rivero Guerrero.

Heart of the King of Kings

In November 2006, the “King of Kings” statue was blessed by the Archbishop of the Diocese Felipe Aguirre Franco and in January 2007, a replica of the statute was blessed by Pope Benedict XVI at the Vatican.

During 2007, the “King of Kings” statute visited several cities in Mexico, including Acapulco, Mexico City, Patzcuaro and Morelia, and was received by over 50,000 people. At each city, local priests conducted Mass, rang the cathedral bells and local citizens conducted a festival celebration with fireworks.

King of Kings with People

The King of Kings was finally returned to Zihuatanejo where it was immersed in the waters off of Las Gatas Beach. It remains there to remind the local people of their commitment to faith. A replica of the statue is at the dive site.

El Rey de Reyes

Tourists and visitors to the area can arrange for snorkeling or scuba diving to the “King of Kings” underwater site in Las Gatas Beach. This quaint little beach, located on the south side of the Zihuatanejo Bay, is a favorite for swimming and snorkeling. Its shallow waters are especially quiet because a legendary rock breakwater off of the shore.  Small beach restaurants serve seafood specialties; beach chairs are provided.

You can visit Las Gatas Beach – or Playa Las Gatas in Spanish- by taking a boat taxi from the Municipal Pier in Zihuatanejo. The scenic ride across the bay takes 10 minutes.

For more information about the Ixtapa Zihuatanejo area, see:

Hotels & Real Estate

Local Attractions & Activities

Restaurants & Menus

Shops & Services

Share

Chihuahua! Those Cute Little Dogs from Mexico!

So popular! Everyone in Mexico seems to have one of those cute, but sometimes fierce, little dogs with the big ears. Named for the Mexican state of Chihuahua that borders Texas and New Mexico, the dog is the oldest breed on the American continent. Historians believe they evolved from a wild dog called the “Techichi” that was domesticated by the Toltecs in 9th-century Mexico. Chihuahuas are also the world’s smallest dog breed, normally weighing between 2 and 8 pounds, with an average height of 6 to 9 inches.

Americans began to become familiar with the breed around 1850, when Mexican merchants started selling them to tourists. The dogs quickly became popular in the United States, and they were registered with the American Kennel Club in 1904.

Chihuahuas come in virtually any color combination, from solid to marked or splashed, allowing for colors from solid black to solid white, spotted, or a variety of other colors and patterns. Colors and patterns can combine and affect each other, resulting in a very high degree of variation. Common colors are fawn, red, cream, chocolate, blue, and black.

Chihuahuas are the ideal lovable, loyal and long-term pets. They are constant companions –they sleep on your lap, sit by your side, or follow you from room to room while you do chores. They are also surprisingly effective watch dogs! They protect your home like their personal domain, barking at the sign of any approaching stranger.

This endearing love and devotion, however, can sometimes evolve into a fierce protectiveness, making them a force to reckon with when they try to compete with other pets or family members for your attention. Nevertheless, this big-time attitude packed inside a pint-sized frame has a remarkable way of being endearing rather than annoying.

Whether in an apartment, a house or a palace, a Chihuahua is perfectly accommodated. They are fairly easy to care for, needing minimal exercise and food. But they love attention! Chihuahuas crave affection and companionship to the point where they may resort to attention-getting tricks. And, before you know it, you’ll probably find yourself responding with an overtime shift of petting, scratching and cuddling!

So, cuddle up…

Many hotels in the Ixtapa Zihuatanejo area are “pet friendly”. Check with the reservations department.

For more information about Ixtapa Zihuatanejo and the surrounding areas, see:

Hotels & Real Estate

Local Attractions & Activities

Restaurants & Menus

Shops & Services

Share

Humane Society of Zihuatanejo Helps and Cares for Local Strays

Many people are unaware that the Ixtapa Zihuatanejo area has a Humane Society to help care for, attend to, and rehabilitate stray animals. The “Sociedad Protectora de Animales de Zihuatanejo” (Animal Humane Society of Zihuatanejo) is located in downtown Zihuatanejo, next to the principal basketball court (Cancha Municipal) at Casa Marina on Paseo del Pescador #9. The telephone number is: (cellular) 755-112-1648, e-mail: SPAZ@zihuatanejo.net

The Humane Society is open Monday through Saturday, from 10:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. and provides the following services:

  • Give refuge to all abandoned, lost, sick, injured or abused animals of any species.
  • Provide treatment and rehabilitation for wildlife and release them anew.
  • Provide a permanent adoption program for domestic animals.
  • Euthanize by humanitarian means wild or domestic animals which are sick or wounded and beyond hope for recovery.
  • Manage a permanent sterilization campaign at low cost for proven low-income owners of dogs and cats.
  • Supervise the correct application of methods of sacrifice in the municipal slaughterhouses.
  • Collaborate with the authorities in vaccination campaigns, control of harmful fauna and halt the illegal commerce and hunting of endangered wildlife.
  • Make the public aware of the Animal Protection Law in the state of Guerrero .

The Humane Society also has the capacity to respond to emergency calls in order to end the suffering of an animal recently hit by a car, maimed or dying abandoned in the street, and for those animals reported with chronic illnesses wandering about alone.

The organization maintains itself with the sale of T-shirts bearing the logo of the Society and with donations from persons within the country and abroad.

The Society is trying to build a new facility and establish educational programs.  All donations are welcome and can be made at the Society’s installations or deposited to their bank account at:

Bank: Banamex

Branch: 0018

Account: 8005020

CLABE: 002282001880050202

For more information about the Ixtapa Zihuatanejo area, see:

Hotels & Real Estate

Local Attractions & Activities

Restaurants & Menus

Shops & Services

Share

Papaya Leaf Juice is a Natural Remedy for Dengue Fever and Chikungunya – See the Video for Preparation

It’s summer time in the tropics, and that means rain and mosquitos. And, mosquitos can cause dengue fever and Chikungunya viruses. The World Health Organization estimates the number of infections across the globe to be 50 million per year. This debilitating and sometimes lethal infection affects more and more people every year. While scientists conduct research to find a cure, nature – the leaves of the papaya tree – helps to relieve the symptoms.papaya leaf

Dengue fever and Chikungunya are viruses transmitted by mosquitos. Symptoms include fever, painful muscles and joint aches, headache, chills, rash, and swollen lymph nodes. Pain behind the eyes is also a common symptom. These symptoms usually last about two to four days and then diminish, only to reappear again. The symptoms may last about one to two weeks with complete recovery, in most cases, in a few weeks.

First, if you are living or traveling in the tropics, you should take precaution to avoid mosquitos –  wear insect repellent, ensure that windows and doors have screens, eliminate any areas with standing water, avoid going out in the early mornings or late evenings, etc.mosquito

The viruses are transmitted from Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes to humans.

Should you have the misfortune of contracting one of these viruses, there’s not much that doctors can currently do except give pain pills. But, nature has its own cure – the juice of papaya leaves! Look at this video to see how to prepare the mixture.

Preparation of Papaya leaf juice. Video by: Mamu Morah on Youtube.com

Reference Source: http://www.emedicinehealth.com/dengue_fever/page2_em.htm#dengue_fever_symptoms_and_signs

Related Articles:

Take Extra Precautions with Food and Drinks in the Summer in Tropical Mexico

Drinking Water and Eating Fruits, Vegetables, and Fish in Mexico

For more information about Ixtapa Zihuatanejo and the surrounding areas, see:

Hotels & Real Estate

Local Attractions & Activities

Restaurants & Menus

Shops & Services

 

Share

It’s Hurricane Season in the Tropics – Be Informed and Prepared!

The hurricane season in the tropics starts in May and continues through November. While residential life and tourism goes on, it is important to be informed about what to do before, during, and after a hurricane. Take these precautions to safeguard your family.Residents recover pieces of wood after high waves dragged their beach stalls into the sea in Coyuca de Benitez

Before a Hurricane

  1. Talk to your family and friends to organize a civil protection plan taking into account the following measures:
  • Determine a place to meet if you get separated in a hurricane.
  • If your house is fragile (reed, palapa, adobe, straw or similar materials), identify a temporary shelter (school, church or city hall) where you can locate in case of emergency.
  • Make necessary repairs to roofs, windows, and walls to prevent hurricane damage.
  • Provide transportation if you have family or elderly persons
  1. Please have the following items ready for an emergency:
  • First aid kit.
  • Radio or cellphone and flashlight with spare parts.
  • Purified or boiled water in covered containers.
  • Canned food (tuna, sardines, beans, milk).
  • Personal documents (birth, marriage, passport, insurance papers, etc. stored in a plastic bag.
  1. Clean the roof, drains, ditches, drains, uncovering sewers, etc. to allow drainage

During a Hurricane

  1. If authorities recommend evacuation – GO! Do not think. Evacuate immediately!
  1. If it is safe to stay at home:
  • Stay calm.
  • Keep your battery-operated radio and/or cellphone on for information and instructions from official sources.
  • Close doors and windows, protecting the glass inside with tape in the form of “X” to protect you from splintering glass. Curtains alone will not provide sufficient protection.
  • Secure loose objects (pots, garbage cans, tools, etc.). Secure television aerials, hanging gadgets, etc.
  • Have warm, waterproof clothing available.
  • Cover appliances or objects that could be damaged or broken with big plastic bags.
  • Constantly check the water level near your home.
  1. If you decide to move to a temporary shelter:
  • Secure your home and take all necessities with you.
  • Remain calm and reassure your family.
  • Listen to your battery-powered radio and/or cellphone for information or instructions for the hurricane.
  • Unplug all appliances and power switches.
  • Shut off gas and water.
  • Do not light candles or lamps that use batteries.
  • Attend to children, elderly and the sick that are with you.
  • Do not leave until authorities say that the danger has ended.

After a Hurricane

  1. Stay calm.
  1. Follow the instructions issued by the authorities through the media.
  1. If there are injuries, gas leaks or any kind of risk, report it immediately to the emergency services.
  1. Take care that your food is clean. Do not eat anything raw.
  1. Boil your drinking water.
  1. Thoroughly clean up any spilled medicines, toxic or flammable substances.
  1. Carefully inspect your home to make sure there is no danger.
  1. Keep off the gas, light, and water to ensure no leakage and no danger of short circuit.
  1. Make sure your appliances are dry before connecting.
  1. Clear any standing water to prevent mosquito infestations.
  1. If you live on hillsides or mountain slopes, be careful of landslides.

Temporary Shelters in Zihuatanejo

The main temporary shelters available to the City of Zihuatanejo de Azueta are:

  • Municipal Auditorium
  • CONALEP
  • Elementary School John N. Alvarez
  • Luis Guevara Ramírez School

Emergency Numbers for the Zihuatanejo Area

CIVIL AND FIRE PROTECTION – 554-75-51 & 554-34-53

MUNICIPAL PUBLIC SAFETY – 554-20-40

MEXICAN RED CROSS – 065

GENERAL HOSPITAL – 554-36-50 & 554-34-36

I.M.S.S. – 554-48-22

MUNICIPAL HEALTH SERVICES – 554-20-88 & 554-32-30

MILITARY NAVAL HOSPITAL- 553-04-99

HURRICANE NOTICES: http://difzihuatanejo.gob.mx/huracanes/

Be informed! Your participation is your protection!

For more information about Ixtapa Zihuatanejo and surrounding areas, see:

Hotels & Real Estate

Local Attractions & Activities

Restaurants & Menus

Shops & Services

 

Share

Bird Watching in Ixtapa Zihuatanejo

Mexico is recognized by nature scholars as one of the four most biologically diverse countries on the planet. Approximately 10% of all known terrestrial species can be found in Mexico, many of which are only found in this country.

Of the approximately 9,000 species of birds in the world, you can find around 1,000 of them in Mexico. In the area around Ixtapa-Zihuatanejo, we are proud to say we have observational records of over 320 different species, or nearly one-third of the country’s total.

This region has physio-graphic characteristics that result in this abundance of bird species – different types of habitats such as the coastline, tropical deciduous forest, the sub-deciduous tropical forest, mangroves and plantations. Of the species that we see in our area, about half are residents and are present throughout the year, and half are migratory, that visit us regularly, especially during winter.

West Mexican Chachalaca

Among the most common resident birds are: Great-tailed Grackle, Yellow-winged Cacique, White-throated Magpie-Jay, Rufous-backed Robin, Groove-billed Ani, Turkey Vulture, Golden Vireo, Green Heron, Rufous-naped Wren, Black and Yellow-crowned Night-Herons, Brown Pelican, Neotropic Cormorant, Magnificent Frigatebird, Great Egret, Snowy Egret, West Mexican Chachalaca, Inca Dove, White-winged Dove, Golden-cheeked Woodpecker, Citreoline Trogon, Squirrel Cuckoo, Cinnamon Hummingbird, White-lored Gnatcatcher, and the Northern Cardinal.

Roseate Spoonbill

With respect to the migratory birds that visit us abundantly, we have: American White Pelican, Roseate Spoonbill, Great Blue Heron, Wood Stork, and some Orioles. Also, the Doubleday´s Hummingbird, a rare endemic bird that lives only in the coastal plain of Oaxaca and Guerrero, can be commonly seen around some feeders.

As we can see, the area of Ixtapa Zihuatanejo is a privileged place for both amateur bird watching and for students of ornithology, as it is unique to find so many different species in one place.  In addition, we are a tourist destination of high quality, making the area doubly attractive to nature enthusiasts.

By: Biologist Pablo Mendizabal Reyes

Bibliography:

Edwards, E.P. (1989). A Field Guide to the Birds of Mexico and Adjacent Areas, 2nd.edition. E.P. Edwards, Sweet Briar, VA.

Howell, S.N.G. and Webb, S. (1994). A Guide to the Birds of Mexico and Northern Central America. Oxford University Press. New York.

Peterson, R. T. and Chalif, E.L. (1973). A field guide to Mexican birds. Houghton Mifflin Co., Boston, MA.

For more information about the Ixtapa Zihuatanejo area, see:

Hotels & Real Estate

Local Attractions & Activities

Restaurants & Menus

Shops & Services

Share

Ixtapa Zihuatanejo Launches Champaign to Fight ZIKA, Dengue and Chikungunya

By VICTOR RAMOS*

/zihuaboletinixtapa.com

On March 16, 2016, Mayor Gustavo Garcia Bello of Zihuatanejo; accompanied by his wife Maricruz Galana Leyva, president of DIF Zihuatanejo; city council members; and health authorities from the federal, state and municipal levels, launched a campaign to combat Zika, Dengue and Chikungunya in the municipality. The campaign includes measures to minimize the risks of transmission, elimination of breeding, and control of the causes of these diseases.

The Mayor says that it is imperative that we take actions to prevent any epidemics, and we will need the participation of the general population. Every household must preserve their environment and comply with the instructions from the health authorities.

“I want to say that the municipality and the state government will aggressively fight against the spread of these diseases,” said Mayor Garcia.

The prevention campaign will include spraying insecticides to kill mosquitos and holing community meetings to inform the general public about preventive measures. Home should eliminate any areas with standing water, window screens should be installed, homes areas should be disinfected, etc.

mosquito-breeding-sites-revised

In addition to these preventive measures, the mayor explained that health authorities are also investigating the underlining causes so that Zika, Dengue and Chikungunya do not harm the population.

* Translation by: Patricia Ann Talley, Editor

Related Articles:

Papaya Leaf Juice is a Natural Remedy for Dengue Fever and Chikungunya: See the Video for Preparation- Imagine-Mexico.com

Medical and Health Care Services for Tourists in Ixtapa Zihuatanejo

Drinking Water and Eating Fruits, Vegetables and Fish in Mexico | imagine-mexico.com

For more information about the Ixtapa Zihuatanejo area, see:

Hotels & Real Estate

Local Attractions & Activities

Restaurants & Menus

Shops & Services

Share

A Whale’s Tail: The Whales of Guerrero Research Project

By: Barbara Erickson.

This season, an amazing group of citizen scientists and naturalists returned to Zihuatanejo, Barra de Potosi, and Troncones to study the migration of humpback whales. Katherina Audley, project founder, says that “season three” promises to be the best yet. “We have five young marine mammal scientists, who will live in the Barra de Potosí village, and five visiting scientists and educators. We plan to log many miles and hours in the study of humpbacks and dolphins and giving classes to introduce marine science in local schools,” she says.

There are seventy-five miles of coastal waters along the state of Guerrero that is part of the Northeastern Pacific humpback whale migration route. The United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) estimates that at least two thousand individual whales travel south along this route each year. The Whales of Guerrero Research Project aims to discover how many humpbacks actually use or transit this area during their migration. Last winter during their ten-week study, the scientists counted two hundred forty two individual whales (of which thirty nine were calves) and took photos of sixty-three flukes.

From: VallartaSource.com

From: VallartaSource.com

That brings us to the whale’s tail. Humpbacks and other marine mammals are identified by the unique marks and patterns of coloration on their tails. So when researches are able to snap a good photo, it allows whale scientists everywhere to compare catalogs and locate known whales during their far ranging travels.

4flukes

Every humpback whale in the world has a fluke, or tail, with a shape and pattern as distinct as a human fingerprint. The project includes cataloging the whales for counting and tracking purposes.

This winter at the Society for Marine Mammalogy Biennial Conference, the Whales of Guerrero Research Project reported that thirteen of “our” whales had previously been seen in Central America and fifteen in other Mexican waters. At this point, the whales of Guerrero have been matched with 91 fluke shots taken between British Columbia, Washington, Oregon and California all the way down to Panama. This research project is filling in a large and previously unexplored gap in humpback whale migration data. It may also prove important to the future of the protected status of humpback whales as more is discovered about their migration, breeding and preferred calving grounds.
ferdinand3

Permission to publish granted by Whales of Guerrero Research Project.

The Whales of Guerrero Research Project is not just all about humpbacks. People and dolphins make it into the mix as well. This year’s project includes a 100-hour land-based field boat/marine mammal interaction study at Playa las Gatas lighthouse, weekly marine science education programs in local schools, interactions with potential whale/dolphin tour guides, training for boat operators and interactions on a daily basis with local folk where ever they find the scientists and researchers at work.

To find out more, go to:  http://www.whalesinmexico.com/ where you can sign up for updates or follow the project on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/whalesinmexico.

For more information about the Ixtapa Zihuatanejo area, see:

Hotels & Real Estate

Local Attractions & Activities

Restaurants & Menus

Shops & Services

Share

Guerrero’s Agricultural Industries: Kids Leaving the Farm vs. the Opportunities

Guerrero, especially the Costa Grande region where Ixtapa Zihuatanejo is located, was once a thriving commercial center for fishing, coconut production, mangos, and other agricultural products. A canal to transport coconuts to the bay for shipping once ran down the center of Zihuatanejo where Coconut’s Restaurant now stands – that’s how the restaurant got its name!

But over the last decade, agricultural production, distribution, and sales in the state and in the Zihuatanejo area have decreased. Recovery of these industries will require vision, the talent of our youth, innovation, new channels of distribution, and new technology.

Weather: In 2013, “Hurricane Manuel” destroyed approximately 196,500 hectares of land in the state of Guerrero, planted with corn, beans, coconut, mango, papaya, and various other agricultural products. This destruction amounted to about 40% of the entire planted land in the state. Many farmers lost their plots entirely and are still trying to recover.

Cattle Ranching: The cattle meat industry in the Zihuatanejo area has decreased by more than half over the last decade. Over the past 8 to 12 years, there has been a decline from 12,000 heads to 5,000 heads annually, according to the United Cattlemen’s Association of Zihuatanejo. New infrastructure, training, and vision are needed to revive the industry.

Cattle Ranching

This decrease in cattle heads is contrary to the population growth in the area. Ten years ago, Zihuatanejo had approximately 70,000 inhabitants, but now has 120,000. Meat consumption has increased, but the supply, unfortunately, is coming from outside of the city.

A lot of frozen meat comes from other states in Mexico that have more infrastructure and technological development. Currently, 50 percent of the meat consumed in the Ixtapa Zihuatanejo area comes from outside the state. Also, many hotels in Ixtapa require fine cuts of meat that are not available in Mexico, and import them from other countries.

Mangoes and Coconuts: With more than 85 million hectares of fields, Guerrero is the principal producer of coconuts; however, it is in last place within the country for exportation, according to Economic Development Department in Petatlán, an agricultural area located about 45 minutes south of Zihuatanejo.

Mango Tree

The Costa Grande region of Guerrero, where Ixtapa Zihuatanejo and Petatlán are located, has more than 54 million of the 85 million hectares of coconut groves within the state, but other states like Nayarit, that have used technology to lead in the production of over 50 coconut byproducts, distributing them nationally and internationally. Likewise, Guerrero is in first place in the nation in mango production, generating more than 26 percent of the country’s total, but, only 1 percent of production is exported.

Fishing: Global warming and “El Niño” have affected Guerrero and the Zihuatanejo area. The weather has been warmer in recent summers, and the tropical rains have enriched the waters with nutriments for the local marine life. This causes greater abundance of fish. With greater supply, the price of fish goes down. That’s good for consumers, but without greater overall sales volume, the income for fishermen is reduced.

Coffee: This year, the Zihuatanejo area experienced lower temperatures during the fall and winter, impacting the coffee growing season. Annual production is estimated to be lower than normal. The state of Guerrero just committed $30 million pesos (approximately $1.9 million USD) to help rejuvenate future production.

Kids Leaving the Farm vs. the Opportunities in Agriculture: As Mexico moves from an agricultural society to a more urbanized one, young people often stop working on the family farm or fishing boat, and begin to seek an education and careers in business and tourism.

But, agricultural technology is a wonderful career that students can pursue to help regain and strengthen the state’s position in the markets, and take advantage of the great potential for national and international sales.

Related Articles:

Eat Mangos from Mexico!

For more information about the Ixtapa Zihuatanejo area, see:

Hotels & Real Estate

Local Attractions & Activities

Restaurants & Menus

Shops & Services

Share

Zihuatanejo Pier Has a New Image!

Look at our pier! We’ve got a brand new sign that is creating a big sensation among the people. Thanks to the collective actions of local architect Andres Saavedra, the College of Architects, businesses, hotels, and local authorities, the new Zihua sign went up this month. WOW!

Zihua Enfoque 1

Photo by: Zihua Enfoque

Andres Saavedra1

Photo by: Andres Saavedra

Boats take off from the pier going to and from Las Gatas Beach for lunch and swimming. But now, the pier has become a fun gathering spot for everyone to enjoy.

Zihua Enfoque 4

Photo by: Zihua Enfoque

Jose Maira Cortes

Photo by: Jose Maria Cortes

Take a look at the action!

De día y de noche, siempre se podrán llevar un recuerdo de Zihuatanejo

Posted by Andy Saavedra on Wednesday, December 23, 2015

 

For more information about the Ixtapa Zihuatanejo area, see:

Hotels & Real Estate

Local Attractions & Activities

Restaurants & Menus

Shops & Services

Share

Warning! Tropical Storm Patricia

Message from the United States Embassy in Mexico City, Dated October 21, 2015:

This Emergency Message is to inform U.S. citizens that the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has issued a Hurricane Watch for the Pacific Coast of Mexico from Lazaro Cardenas, Michoacan to Playa Perula, Jalisco, and a Tropical Storm Watch east of Lazaro Cardenas to Tecpan De Galeana, Guerrero. Tropical Storm Patricia is expected to produce total rainfall accumulations of 6 to 12 inches, with isolated maximum amounts of 20 inches, over the states of Jalisco, Colima, Michoacan and Guerrero starting Thursday, October 22, into Saturday, October 24. These rains could produce life-threatening flash floods and mud slides.

We strongly encourage you to monitor media reports and the Mexican government’s civil protection (“Protección Civil”) website, http://www.proteccioncivil.gob.mx for updated information about the storm and to follow official instructions.

Stay clear of beaches, as rough seas associated with storm conditions create severe hazards. U.S. citizens should stay in contact with relatives and friends in the United States to apprise them of their whereabouts, both before and after the storm. Visitors should be familiar with their hotel or cruise ship evacuation plans, as well as the location of Mexican government-run emergency shelters.

Please also visit the following U.S. government websites for more information:

We strongly recommend that U.S. citizens traveling to or residing in Mexico enroll in the Department of State’s Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) at travel.state.gov.  STEP enrollment gives you the latest security updates, and makes it easier for the U.S. embassy or nearest U.S. consulate to contact you in an emergency.  If you don’t have Internet access, enroll directly with the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate.

Visit the Embassy’s website and sign up for Facebook and Twitter.  Regularly monitor the State Department’s website, where you can find current Travel Warnings, (including the Travel Warning for Mexico), Travel Alerts, and the Worldwide Caution. Read the Country Specific Information for Mexico, and refer to the “Traveler’s Checklist” on the State Department’s website. Contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate for up-to-date information on travel restrictions. You can also call 1-888-407-4747 toll-free in the United States and Canada or 1-202-501-4444 from other countries. These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays). Follow the State Department on Twitter and Facebook to have travel information at your fingertips.

Consular services for Michoacan and Guerrero are provided by the U.S. Embassy in Mexico City, located at Paseo de la Reforma 305, Colonia Cuauhtemoc, Mexico D.F., 06500. The Embassy is open Monday through Friday, from 8:00am to 5:00pm, except for U.S. and Mexican holidays. Our telephone number during and outside of business hours is 011-52-555-080-2000.

Jalisco and Colima are serviced by the U.S. Consulate General in Guadalajara, located at Progreso 175, Colonia Americana, Guadalajara, Jalisco C.P. 44160. The Consulate General is open Monday through Friday from 8:00 am to 4:30 pm, except for U.S. and Mexican holidays. Our telephone number during and outside of business hours is 011-52-333-268-2100.

For a full list of Consulates General and Consular Agencies in Mexico please visit our website at http://mexico.usembassy.gov/eng/edirectory.html

For more information about Ixtapa Zihuatanejo and the surrounding areas, see:

Hotels & Real Estate

Local Attractions & Activities

Restaurants & Menus

Shops & Services

Share

Owen Lee – Zihuatanejo’s Famous Diver, Naturalist and Writer

Owen Lee PhotoAn underwater diver, a former camera man with Captain Jacques Cousteau, a naturalist, a writer, and one of the first Americans to live in the area – Owen Lee has helped bring fame to Zihuatanejo and has promoted conservation in the area for over 40 years.

Owen is one of Zihuatanejo’s most endeared personalities. He has had an amazing life and career!

Born in Miami, Florida in 1928, Owen Lee went to Paris in 1950 to study, where by sheer chance, he met Captain Jacques Cousteau.  He later worked as an underwater cameraman for Captain Cousteau aboard his famous ship, the Calypso. He was a lecturer and spokesman, presenting Cousteau’s Adventure programs to audiences in over 300 cities throughout America and wrote the first three books on diving in the English language for Doubleday and Company.

Owen Lee and Jacques Cousteau

Owen Lee and Captain Jacques Cousteau in Paris in the early 1950’s.

Owen came to Zihuatanejo, Mexico to live in 1968, after retiring from the Cousteau Team.  He created a Nature Study Center on Las Gatas Beach in Zihuatanejo to promote Cousteau’s ideas about the reintegrating mankind into the global ecosystem.

Owen Lee Profile photo

Owen produced an hour-long documentary film titled “The Endless Sea,” narrated by actor James Mason and astronaut Scott Carpenter, and published two books about his experiences, “A Prisoner in Paradise” and “Mother Nature, My Nature.”

Listen about some of Owen Lee’s amazing experiences in a short clip from his DVD, “The End Game”:

You can order the full hour-long DVD of “The End Game” from www.Amazon.comThe End Game: Documentary, Owen Lee: Movies & TV

Owen Lee’s books are available for purchase on www.Amazon.com.

A Prisoner in Paradise

A Prisoner In Paradise: The True Adventures of a Forbidden Love Affair In Zihuatanejo, Mexico: If you ever dreamed about living, working or investing in an exotic, tropical paradise, “A Prisoner in Paradise” is a fast, funny and informative preview what kind of adventures might await you!

Mother Nature My Nature

Mother Nature / My Nature: A look into man’s evolutionary past to discover the causes of our present conflicts with Nature and to define the ways to our collective survival in the near future.

Dog Gone

Dog Gone!: A sweet, family oriented story about two pre-teenagers who volunteer to raise a guide dog puppy for their local school for the blind.

To learn more about Owen Lee, go to: www.owenlee.name

Related Articles: 

See our Nature Section | imagine-mexico.com

For more information about Ixtapa Zihuatanejo and the surrounding areas, see:

Hotels & Real Estate

Local Attractions & Activities

Restaurants & Menus

Shops & Services

 

Share

Hurricane Warning for the Pacific Coast – List of Emergency Shelter & Phones

The Mexican government and foreign embassies are advising residents and travelers that a Hurricane Warning has been issued for the Pacific coast from Tecpan de Galeana, Guerrero to Lazaro Cardenas, Michoacán, and a Tropical Storm Warning from Acapulco to east of Tecpan de Galeana.

Hurricane Warning Symbol

According to a public advisement, hurricane “Marty” is expected to produce rainfall amounts of 6 to 12 inches over the Mexican state of Guerrero, and 2 to 5 inches over the state of Michoacán through Thursday, October 1, 2015. Isolated amounts of 20 inches are possible in Guerrero from the Sierra Madre del Sur Mountains toward the coast. These rains are expected to produce life-threatening flash floods and mud slides, especially in areas of mountainous terrain. A dangerous storm surge is expected to produce significant coastal flooding, large and destructive waves, and swells are likely to cause life-threatening surf and rip current conditions.

Residents and travelers are strongly encouraged to monitor media reports and the Mexican government’s civil protection website for updated information about the storm and to follow official instructions. Go to: http://www.proteccioncivil.gob.mx.

Precautions to take:

  • Determine a place to meet if you and your family get separated because of a hurricane.
  • If your house is fragile (reed, palapa, adobe, straw, or similar materials) identify a temporary shelter (school, church, or city hall) where you can relocate.
  • Make necessary repairs to roofs, windows, and walls to prevent further damage.
  • Provide transportation if you have family or elderly patients.

Have the following items ready for an emergency:

  • First aid kit
  • Radio and flashlight with spare parts
  • Purified water or boiled in covered containers
  • Canned food (tuna, sardines, beans, milk)
  • Personal documents (birth, marriage, primer, agricultural papers, etc. Stored in plastic bag.

So far, the Zihuatanejo area has received strong winds and rains. Schools are currently closed until the alert is cancelled. Residents and travelers are advised to stay clear of the beaches, since rough seas associated with storms can cause high waves and hazardous conditions.

Risk areas in Zihuatanejo and its peripheral colonies:

  • Arroyo del Limon
  • Agua de Correa
  • Arroyo Calechoso
  • Rio de Pantla
  • River or Lake San Jose Ixtapa (Old Quarter)
  • Coacoyul

Temporary Shelters Available:

  • Municipal Auditorium
  • CONALEP
  • Elementary School John N. Alvarez
  • Luis Guevara Ramírez School

Alternate Shelters:

  • Esc Prim Lt. Fed. José Azueta (Los Almendros)
  • Esc Prim Fed Cuauhtémoc (El Zarco)
  • Esc Prim Miguel Hidalgo (San Miguelito)
  • Redemption Prim Tropical Escape (San Jose Ixtapa)
  • Esc Prim Miguel Aleman (New Town)
  • Esc Prim Cuauhtémoc (San Jose Ixtapa)
  • Esc Prim Juan Peztalozzi (The Posquelite)
  • Esc Vicente Guerrero (Pantla)
  • Esc Emiliano Zapata (The Nitrate)
  • Esc Leona Vicario (The Coacoyul)
  • Esc Josefa Ortiz de Domínguez (The Achotes)
  • Matiana Escape Orb (Agua de Correa)
  • Esc Technical Sec 52 (The Dam)
  • Esc Technical Sec 186 (Infonavit the Hujal)
  • Esc Sec Eva Samano de Lopez Mateo (Downtown)
  • High 5 (Col. Cuauhtemoc) – 13 Preparatory UAG (Col. Sports)

Emergency Numbers:

  • CIVIL AND FIRE PROTECTION: 554-7551 & 554-3453
  • MUNICIPAL PUBLIC SAFETY: 554-2040
  • MEXICAN RED CROSS: 065
  • GENERAL HOSPITAL: 554-3650 & 554-3436
  • M.S.S.: 554-4822
  • MUNICIPAL HEALTH SERVICES: 554-2088 & 554-3230
  • MILITARY NAVAL HOSPITAL: 553-0499

For more information about Ixtapa Zihuatanejo and the surrounding areas, see:

Hotels & Real Estate

Local Attractions & Activities

Restaurants & Menus

Shops & Services

 

Share

“Hang 10” – The Thrill of Surfing in Ixtapa Zihuatanejo!

Surfing is a thrilling experience with nature for kids, teens and adults of all ages.  City dwellers, just imagine riding the crystal clear, blue waves?  “Hang your 10 toes” over a surfboard!

David Rutherford Las Escolleras Ixtapa

Body Surfing 3

The state of Guerrero, where Ixtapa Zihuatanejo is located, is known worldwide for its terrific surfing.  Local areas that are great for surfing include: Las Gatas Beach, Playa Linda, Ixtapa Marina, Troncones, Solidita and others.

Las Escolleras beach

Body surfing

One of our local surfing experst is Leonel Pérez Yáñez at Catcha L’Ola Surf School and Surf Trips in Ixtapa. According to him, the sport started in Mexico in the late 60’s when surfers from the USA came here to enjoy the fresh waters. “Back then, Mexicans knew very little about surfing; it originated in Hawaii. We kids hung out on the beach with the American guys. We learned the sport and we learned English. We didn’t have surfboards. We’d get pieces of wood from the local carpenters and try to make boards out of them,” says Leonel.

Surf Oloa

Surfing in Mexico has come a long way since those early days. Now, there is the Mexican Surf/Skate Association (MSA) and the Asociación de Surfing del Estado de Guerrero (Surfing Association of the State of Guerrero) along with many local, national and international competitions in Mexico.

ImageJPEG_0700

Body surfing 2

So, are you ready for a natural thrill?  Especially you city folks!  Come on down to Ixtapa Zihuatanejo – and “Hang 10”!

For more information about the Ixtapa Zihuatanejo area, see:

Hotels & Real Estate

Local Attractions & Activities

Restaurants & Menus

Shops & Services

 

Share

Experience the Thrill of Surfing in Troncones Beach, Mexico – Enjoy the Videos!

Troncones Beach, located on the Pacific Coast of the Mexican Riviera, is known for its natural beauty, wildlife, romantic retreats, and surfing. American surfers started visiting the beach back in the 1960s and taught the locals how to surf. Now, surfing is popular throughout the country. Troncones Beach continues to be one of the most beautiful surfing spots in the world today.

There’s nothing like seeing for yourself, so here are some videos to give you a sample of the experience.

First, enjoy the sunrise at Troncones Beach. It’s a time for peace and meditation. Absorb the magnificent beauty of nature.

Next, let’s hit the surf! Enjoy the thrill of this video. It rocks!

Video provided by Matt McCabe of Casa Carolina Vacation Rental & Surf Retreat in Troncones Beach, Mexico.

For more information about Troncones Beach and the Ixtapa Zihuatanejo area, see:

Hotels & Real Estate

Local Attractions & Activities

Restaurants & Menus

Shops & Services

Related Articles:

Discover the Natural Beauty of Troncones Beach, Mexico

From Troncones, Mexico to Paris, France -The Art of Mari Carmen Hernandez

For more information about the Ixtapa Zihuatanejo area, see:

Hotels & Real Estate

Local Attractions & Activities

Restaurants & Menus

Shops & Services

Share

Eat Mangos from Mexico!

By: Barbara Erickson.

In 2013, Mexico became the number one producer of mangos in the world, replacing India. And, the majority of Mexico’s mangos are grown right here in our state of Guerrero! 1

Mexico exports mangos to the United States, Canada, Japan, UK, Belgium, Spain, France, Germany, Netherlands, Guatemala, Austria, Switzerland, Australia, Costa Rica, Israel, Italy, Luxembourg, New Zealand, Brazil, South Korea, Colombia, and Sweden.

Mangos mexicanos

The state of Guerrero is the main producer of mangos with 22 percent of the total national volume; Nayarit, with 17 percent, and Sinaloa with 14 percent. These three states contribute 53 percent of national production. The rest is produced in Chiapas, Oaxaca, Michoacán, Veracruz, Jalisco, Colima and Campeche.

Mangos are not only delicious, but they are extremely important to the local economy. The mango industry in Guerrero employs eighty-five thousand workers (not full time) in fifty-eight municipalities in Guerrero, including Zihuatanejo.

Mango trees grow well here in the Zihuatanejo area. The majestic trees can reach heights of thirty meters, with broad canopies and thick sturdy trunks. Trees have been known to live three hundred years and produce as many as six thousand fruits in a season! Here, in younger orchards, the trees are often topped after harvest to keep them manageable and encourage better yields.

Mango Tree

You can see established mango orchards along Interstate Highway 200 and younger orchards along the road to Barra de Potosi. The pendulous golden fruits hang tantalizingly from their long heavy stems, making our mouths water at the sight of them. Mango fruit stands pop up along the road ways and at the local mercado; the variety and abundance can be overwhelming.

The most popular varieties of mangos are the Manila and the Ataulfo; both are kidney-shaped and deep yellow. They are Asian varieties, tolerant of humidity and resistant to pests and disease. Early orchards here grew the petacon (paraiso) and Haden varieties; large oval fruits, generally a deep green color blushing to pink and orange when ripe. A favorite early season mango is the criollo; a small kidney shaped fruit often harvested when green and cooked whole with lots of sugar as a dessert.

Mangos are not only delicious; they are excellent sources of vitamin A, lutein, and zeaxanthin. There is some evidence that these substances are helpful in preventing macular degeneration, another reason to enjoy mangos at this time of year. They contain vitamin C, some of the B vitamins, and even vitamin E. Mango leaves, bark, and skins are used medicinally to treat bronchitis and internal hemorrhaging. But beware: mangos are part of the family that includes poison ivy and their skins and sap can be highly irritating.

One way to enjoy the bounty of mangos we have this time of year is to make Mango Cobbler. See the link to the recipe below and get on your way to year round enjoyment of this delicious fruit.

Mango Cobbler

1Source: Secretaría de Agricultura, Ganadería, Desarrollo Rural, Pesca y Alimentación (Secretariat of Agriculture, Livestock, Rural Development, Fisheries and Food) http://www.sagarpa.gob.mx/saladeprensa/2012/Paginas/2014B289.aspx .

Related Articles:

Mango Dessert Recipes

For more information about Ixtapa Zihuatanejo and surrounding areas, see:

Hotels & Real Estate

Local Attractions & Activities

Restaurants & Menus

Shops & Services

Share

Yoga for Peace: On the Beach February 4 and 7; Viral on February 5

Breathe in the world; exhale peace! Ixtapa Zihuatanejo welcomes Master Charles Kim and Ms. Jennifer Kim from The Peace School in Chicago, Illinois, who will be our special guests for the Celebration of Peace, courtesy of Viceroy Hotel in Zihuatanejo.

The International Association for World Peace, known as The Peace School, is a non-profit, equal opportunity educational organization headquartered in Chicago since 1972. It has no political or religious affiliations.

The Peace School’s mission is to help people of all ages practice peace in everyday life. By attaining peace in mind, body and spirit, we create the foundation for a broader peace in our families, schools, communities, nations and world.

Peace Yoga is the perfect combination of basic stretches, yoga postures, breath work, meditation and relaxation, all geared to create harmony within the mind, body and spirit. The Peace Yoga movements are designed to stretch and tone muscles, loosen stiff joints, help correct poor posture, improve balance and leave you feeling agile and refreshed.

Master Kim

Master Charles Kim will conduct a class in Yoga for Peace for kids, and a viral workshop for youth in Ixtapa Zihuatanejo.

A lifelong meditator, Master Charles Kim, who is president of The Peace School, is a 9th degree black belt in Traditional Tae Kwon Do and teaches these classes, as well as Peace Yoga, and Peace Breathing Meditation. He shares some of his engaging stories in his book, Peace Breathing: Lessons on Achieving Peace in Everyday Life (Amika Press 2012). See: Master Charles Kim- bio.

Peace Breathing Meditation is an easy-to- practice form of meditation suited to today’s hectic lifestyles. Peace Breathing Meditation is based on scientific principles and is not associated with a religion.  It combines the vital energy of breath with the powerful energy of thought to calm your mind and reduce stress.

Jennifer Kim - Education Peace Team

Ms. Jennifer Kim is a director of The Peace School in Chicago, and founder of Peace Day Chicago.

Ms. Jennifer Kim is a director of The Peace School, with which she has been affiliated for more than thirty-five years. Ms. Kim is the founder of Peace Day in Chicago, which she began in 1978, and also chairs the Chicago Build the Peace Committee which was formed in 2008. Ms. Kim also co-chairs the Education Peace Team of the United Nations NGO Committee for the International Day of Peace. See: Jennifer Kim – Bio, The Peace School of Chicago.

Join us, in person or on-line, for these exciting events!

Wednesday, February 4, 2015

INAUGURATION OF ACTIVITIES FOR THE CELEBRATION OF PEACE– 9:30 am

Place: Viceroy Hotel Zihuatanejo

Viceroy_logo_ZIHUATANEJO-01

Community Invitees: Municipal Officials, Hotel Association, Restaurant Association, Club Rotary Zihuatanejo, Club Rotary Ixtapa, Civil Associations, Universities. The public is welcome!

 YOGA FOR PEACE FOR KIDS (FREE PUBLIC EVENT) – 10:00 am – 11:00 am

Place: Viceroy Hotel Zihuatanejo

Special Guest Instructor: Master Charles Kim, The Peace School of Chicago

 Thursday, February 5, 9:30 am–12:30 pm

VIRAL YOGA FOR PEACE IN THE INTERNATIONAL YOUTH PEACE WEBINAR AND CONVENTION

Help us set a world record! You can join us from your home, office or school. Go to: https://vonvo.com/v/peace-in-action Use a laptop or desktop computer with a videocam; no mobile devices. Use Google Chrome or Firefox. To participate and chat, create a personal user account on Vonvo using email or Facebook login.

Saturday, February 7, 2015

YOGA FOR PEACE FOR ADULTS (FREE PUBLIC EVENT) – 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Place: Beach in front of Viceroy Hotel Zihuatanejo

Special Guest Instructors: Jennifer Kim and Master Charles Kim, The Peace School of Chicago

For more information, contact: Zihuatanejo Peace Committee (755) 112-2119, or email mailto:zihuatanejocomitedepaz@gmail.com

Related Articles:

Celebration of Peace, Feb. 2-8, 2015 – Schedule of Events with the Zihuatanejo Sailfest

Zihuatanejo Hosts International Youth and Educators Webinars for Peace on February 5, 2015

Ambassador of Peace Art Collection on Display at Zihuatanejo Museum Starting February 4, 2015

For more information about the Ixtapa Zihuatanejo area, see:

Hotels & Real Estate

Local Attractions & Activities

Restaurants & Menus

Shops & Services

Share

The Whales of Guerrero Research Project is Returning!

By: Katherina Audley, Founder

The Whales of Guerrero research/education project was started in 2013. The objective of this project is to identify and chart the population of humpback whales that visit the coast of Guerrero each winter. Although their presence here has long been known, no scientific study has ever taken place.

From: VallartaSource.com

From: VallartaSource.com

So far, we have found that the humpback whales of Guerrero spend the summer and fall along the west coast of the United States, but a few of our whales have been spotted as far north as Washington state during the summer and as far south as Nicaragua during the winter.

This winter, for the second year, teams of expert whale scientists will take to the water every day to spot and photograph whales and dolphins. Their work will include a population count, fluke identification, counting cow/calf pairs, noting behavior and movement and recording songs and vocalizations.

Fluke identification? Every humpback whale in the world has a fluke, or tail, with a shape and pattern as distinct as a human fingerprint. We are going to photograph individual fluke prints, catalog them and share them with scientists along the entire west coast of North America from British Columbia to Oaxaca (the state south of Guerrero) who are studying the same whales, so that we can get a better sense of where whales travel and how often they move between different grounds.

4flukes

Every humpback whale in the world has a fluke, or tail, with a shape and pattern as distinct as a human fingerprint. The project includes cataloging the whales for counting and tracking purposes.

The team of scientists and educators will also be training local boatmen in the strict non-invasive protocols for approaching these whales in order to build friendlier and more trusting relationships. Additionally, local commercial and sport fishermen have formed a network to assist the scientists in whale-spotting. Along with obtaining scientific knowledge, concurrent goals of the project are to certify boat operators to run informed, responsible marine wildlife tours and to run educational workshops in local communities. Everyone interested in supporting the project can make a tax-deductible contribution at http://www.whalesinmexico.com/donate.htm.

2whales

The project has attracted the attention and support of the Oceanic Society that is sponsoring a series of natural history tours to the area where participants can join the scientists on the water and learn hydro-acoustic recording and whale fluke identification techniques, as well as tour the eight biomes that comprise the Playa Blanca area with trained naturalists. There even will be a night tour of a crocodile lagoon.

ferdinand3

Go to our website for detailed information on the Whales of Guerrero Research Project and links to the Oceanic Society natural history tours: www.whalesinmexico.com. You can also find us on Facebook:   http://www.facebook.com/whalesinmexico.

Related Articles:

Humpback Whales – These Snow Birds Visit Ixtapa Zihuatanejo Every Year

For more information about Ixtapa Zihuatanejo and surrounding areas, see:

Hotels & Real Estate

Local Attractions & Activities

Restaurants & Menus

Shops & Services

Share

Campus Yoga Returns to Ixtapa Zihuatanejo on November 28, 29 and 30, 2014!

Ixtapa Zihuatanejo is a place for peace and relaxation. By the ocean, immersed in nature, you can reconnect with your inner self and find harmony with the environment. Ixtapa Zihuatanejo is a perfect place for Campus Yoga  that will be returning for its second annual event on November 28, 29 and 30.

CY14-banner_principal_ING

Campus Yoga is a three-day event that brings different disciplines and holistic practices such as Yoga, Tai Chi, meditation, alternative medicine, food, and music together. The event consists of conferences and classes taught by renowned yoga teachers, complemented by a series of related activities.

Renowned Mexican and international teachers will share their experience and knowledge during Campus Yoga, including:

Alejandro Maldonado – Yoga instructor and TV personality

maestro-maldonado-280

Nayeli Nateras – Yoga for children, adolescents, adults, and families

maestro-nateras-280

Rodney Lee – has given workshops and seminars around the world for over fifteen years

maestro-rodney-280

Dr. Jorge Bucay – medic and writer on physiotherapy

maestro-bucay-280

Activities include:

  • Water Yoga with Sergio Arana
  • Acroyoga with Alex Quiyono
  • Ayurveda class with Michele Torres
  • Aromatherapy class with Vanessa Fernandez
  • Mantras for Meditation with Isaac Fernandez
  • Tai Chi with Juliet Portilla
  • Vegetarian Cooking class with Jamie Davies
  • Massage session on the beach
  • Holistic Bazaar
  • Yoga sessions for children

meditacion-2

water-yoga

All activities are at Club Med Hotel in Ixtapa on Friday, Saturday and Sunday, November 28, 29 and 30. Click to download the schedule: Campus Yoga EnglishCampusYoga Español

The cost is: Single Class $100.00 pesos; Workshop with Rodney Yee $150 pesos; Conference with Jorge Bucay $150 pesos; Complete day $500.00 pesos; Full event $1,350.00 pesos.  You can purchase tickets on-line at www.eticket.mx , or at the hotel on the day of the event. In Mexico, you can call: 1 800 ETICKET.

Connect to nature and enjoy Campus Yoga 2014 in Ixtapa Zihuatanejo!

For more information about the Ixtapa Zihuatanejo area, see:

Hotels & Real Estate

Local Attractions & Activities

Restaurants & Menus

Shops & Services

Share

Hurricane Polo Damages the Pier, Restaurants, and Walkways in Zihuatanejo Communities

It’s hurricane season in the tropics. During mid-September, strong winds and waves from hurricane Polo struck the coastline of the state of Guerrero, causing erosion at several beaches, damages to restaurants, and a loss of income for workers employed in tourism services.

The Civil Protection Agency reported that the regions along the coast of Guerrero sustained winds of up to 40 miles per hour and waves up to 10 feet high. In total, there were over eighty beachfront restaurants within the state that incurred damages.

In Zihuatanejo, the Civil Protection Agency reports damages to several beachfront restaurants, the pier at Playa Linda beach, the scenic walkway along Playa La Madera, and the pier at Playa Las Gatas, as well as erosion of the El Palmar and Playa Blanca beaches. The pier in Zihuatanejo was closed for two days. The pier at Playa Linda was most affected and almost completely destroyed. At Ixtapa Island, one hundred men have been without work due to the bad weather.

The community of Barra de Potosi reported a loss of more than $100,000 pesos in business sales. Eighteen enramadas (small, beachfront restaurants) were affected by the bad weather. They incurred damages to the bathrooms, loss of furniture, and destruction of their beachfronts.

Most importantly, there were no deaths reported.

Please see this video of the storm and its affects.


Video is courtesy of Jorge De la Rosa Bernal.

 

For more information about Ixtapa Zihuatanejo and the surrounding areas, see:

Hotels & Real Estate

Local Attractions & Activities

Restaurants & Menus

Shops & Services

 

Share

A Passion for Fun: Scuba Diving in Zihuatanejo, Mexico

By: Joao Gouveia, Owner of Dive Zihua.

I have a passion for fun, conservation, and safety – and, I want to show you that diving into the underwater world is one of the best ways to experience this magical part of the universe. It’s a thrill beyond words to encounter everything from reefs, a rock face or caverns, to amazing whale-sharks, manta rays, eagle rays, nudibranchs, sea horses, frog fish, octopi, moray eels, turtles, and sharks. Here in Zihuatanejo, we have everything you might want to see with a splash of humor and some fun surprises along the way.

Dive Zihua is PADI certified (Professional Association of Diving Instructors) scuba diving and snorkeling shop, located in the heart of downtown Zihuatanejo–just a block from the ocean. We are an experienced PADI Dive Resort with an atmosphere you would expect to find in a small dive operation. We not only have a passion for diving, but we have also been involved with conservation efforts for years. It’s our philosophy to offer safe and fun experiences combined with an appreciation of the aquatic environment.

Joao Gouveia Dive Zihua

This photo shows me (on the right) giving diving instructions.

I was born in Portugal and I’ve been diving for years in various places around the world. But, I have a passion for Zihuatanejo-and I want to share it with you. Come and visit us when you are in town. We offer both diving and snorkeling tours. We also rent equipment to certified dive masters and instructors, and provide internships for students.

See for yourself! Enjoy this video filmed in the Zihuatanejo Bay.

Related Articles:

Ixtapa Zihuatanejo Hotels and Beach Win Travel Awards for 2014

Students! Come to the International Youth Peace Conference in Zihuatanejo, Mexico – or Participate in a Webinar

For more information about Ixtapa Zihuatanejo and the surrounding areas, see:

Hotels & Real Estate

Local Attractions & Activities

Restaurants & Menus

Shops & Services

 

Share

Discover the Natural Beauty of Troncones Beach, Mexico

By: William H. Tucker, Publisher and Patricia Ann Talley, Editor.

Troncones Beach is a pristine beach of natural beauty on the Pacific Coast, about 25 minutes north of Ixtapa Zihuatanejo on the new Interstate Highway 200. Situated at the base of a small coastline mountain range with subtropical forests, Troncones boasts of spectacular beach houses and luxurious villas and beach front bungalows for rent. Unforgettable sunsets, an abundance of natural wildlife and a clean, uncrowded beach make Troncones the perfect get away. The area is known for surfing and also for the caves that dot the mountain side.

Troncones -2 Hans Brouwers

Photo by: Hans Brouwers

Day Trips to Troncones

If you are visiting Ixtapa or Zihuatanejo, a day trip to Troncones is easy and fun, but we recommend at least two days if you are looking for a retreat. You can rent a car or take a taxi to the beach town. There are local taxis available in Troncones to take you around the area. Troncones Beach is great for walking, swimming, horseback riding and boogie boarding. There are tide pools among the lava rock. You can spend the entire day watching the waves, the birds and the wildlife. Also available are surf board and bike rentals, surfing lessons, eco tours and more. Visit: Costa Nativa Ecotours – Kayaking, Hiking, Boat & Bicycle Tours in Troncones, Mexico.

Troncones 1 Frank Sheppard

Troncones 2 Frank Sheppard

“La Majahua,” the next little village to the north, is home to a small fishing fleet where you can buy freshly caught fish and lobster directly from the local fishermen. “Boca Lagunillas,” another nearby beach, has a large lagoon edged with lush vegetation and filled with flocks of many different kinds of birds.  It is a great place for bird watching and kayaking. “Playa La Salidita,” about 5 miles further north, is an excellent swimming and surfing beach. There are many palapa-type restaurants there.

Troncones Beach is part of the municipality of “La Unión.” Its downtown area is located about 20 minutes further north along Interstate Highway 200. Tuesdays are market days when you can buy fresh produce, poultry and seafood directly from local farmers and fishermen. Hours are from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.

Where to Eat 

There are numerous restaurants located along the beach in Troncones.  Many local restaurants stay open all year long to host both national and international guests. A local favorite is Restaurant Costa Brava, located on the beach just right of the main road. The restaurant at Present Moments Retreat is also open year-round. From November through April, Roberto’s Bistro (the old “Burro Boracho”) has traditional Mexican dancers on Saturday evenings.

Where to Stay

One of the major reasons why people vacation and live in Troncones is its unspoiled natural beauty and wildlife. It is truly a unique experience to be “upfront and close” to nature. Many people spend their entire vacations on Troncones Beach, or split their time between there and Ixtapa Zihuatanejo.

Toncones 1 Glen Novey

Photo by: Glen Novey, Casa Delfin Sonriente

Troncones has about 400 residents with a sizeable enclave of American and Canadian-owned homes, small hotels, B& B’s and vacation rental units, like Casa Ki Bungalows – Bed and Breakfast Inn, Posada de los Raqueros Beachfront Resort and Casa Delle Forchette Luxury Vacation Home. Present Moment Retreat, ranked by Trip Advisor as one of the best small hotels in Mexico, is also located in Troncones.

palapas at Casa Ki

Photo by:  Casa Ki Bungalows

Troncones 3 - Hans Brouswers

Photo by: Hans Brouwers, Posada de los Raqueros Beachfront Resort

The Sea Turtles

Wildlife is part of the charm of Troncones Beach that is host to many sea turtles, which are an endangered species. Female sea turtles must come ashore to lay their eggs in the sand. Most females return to lay eggs on the beach where they were born, so every year, there are new sea turtles in the area.

Sea turtle

In the water, sea turtles are agile and graceful, but on land they see poorly, don’t hear or smell well, and are slow and clumsy. Sadly, harvesting their eggs for food and killing the adults for meat is widely accepted. Mexico has strong conservation laws to protect the sea turtles. It is illegal to harm, harass, or kill them, their hatch-lings, or their eggs.

Some of the hotels and B&B’s in Troncones and the Municipality of Union maintain protected sea turtle hatcheries in an effort to save them. You will see signs in the area announcing “Turtle Release Days” when protected young hatch-lings are released into the sea.

See the video about this wonderful conservation program:

Discover the natural beauty of Troncones Beach!  Plan to spend some vacation time in this wonderful paradise along the Pacific.

____________________________________________________________

Source:  La Conexión 2013 Troncones Guide & Directory

The writers lived in Troncones for five (5) years.

For more information about the Ixtapa Zihuatanejo area, see:

Hotels & Real Estate

Local Attractions & Activities

Restaurants & Menus

Shops & Services

Related Articles:

From Troncones, Mexico to Paris, France: The Art of MariCarmen Hernandez

“Women in the Kitchens of México”: Recipes from Carmen Ayala Higuera of Costa Brava Restaurant in Troncones Beach

 

Share

June is Ocean Month: Take Action Now to Preserve the Beaches of Zihuatanejo and Oceans Everywhere!

June 8 is Ocean Day, and the month is dedicated to conserving our world’s oceans. This is especially important to the tourist resort area of Zihuatanejo, since Playa Principal, the main beach in the downtown area, was closed for swimming in April 2014, due to contamination.

While the Ixtapa Zihuatanejo area has many other beaches for residents and tourists to enjoy (Playa La Ropa, Playa La Madera, Playa El Palmar, etc.), the closure of the downtown beach is a serious call for everyone-government officials and the public-to take immediate action to clean and protect our precious ocean and its natural marine life.

Wherever you live, in Zihuatanejo or in any waterfront area, now is the time to take action to preserve our oceans! Here are some things you can do.

In the Ixtapa Zihuatanejo area, residents and tourists are urged to respect and follow the clean beach rules established by the municipal government and the Clean Beach Committee.

Beach Rules in Ixtapa Zihuatanejo:

  • Glass and Styrofoam are not permitted.
  • No dogs, pets, or horses
  • No camping
  • No fires on the beach
  • No automotive vehicles or 4-wheel vehicles
  • Do not remove the natural flowers and vegetation
  • Do not disturb the natural wildlife

Beach trash cans

Ixtapa Zihuatanejo also has a Clean Beach Certification Program to promote the conservation of natural resources. The public can volunteer and get involved. (more…)

Share

Mangos! King of Fruits

By: Barbara Erickson.

Mango season is here in Ixtapa Zihuatanejo.  The pendulous golden fruits hang tantalizingly from their long heavy stems, making our mouths water at the sight of them. Mango fruit stands pop up along the road ways and at the local mercado; the variety and abundance can be overwhelming.

The most popular varieties of mangos are the Manila and the Ataulfo; both are kidney-shaped and deep yellow. They are Asian varieties, tolerant of humidity and resistant to pests and disease. Early orchards here grew the petacon (paraiso) and Haden varieties; large oval fruits, generally a deep green color blushing to pink and orange when ripe. A favorite early season mango is the criollo; a small kidney shaped fruit often harvested when green and cooked whole with lots of sugar as a dessert.

Mango Tree (more…)

Share

Barra de Potosi – The “Last Best Beach” in the Ixtapa Zihuatanejo Area

By: Barbara Erickson.

If you are vacationing in Zihuatanejo or Ixtapa we invite you to stray just 20 minutes off the beaten path to discover authentic Mexico in all its glory; Barra de Potosi – the “Last Best Beach.” Barra de Potosi is a tiny, marginal fishing village on Playa Blanca Beach. Located to the south on Highway 200, it’s the “Last Best Beach” or southern-most beach in the Ixtapa Zihuatanejo area. The village is a short drive or bus ride away.

Barra de Potosi is best known for its tranquil lagoon, a favorite for swimmers, surfers or nature watchers. The beachfront is lined with small restaurants, “enramadas” that serve marvelous freshly-caught sea food along with traditional Mexican dishes. With hammocks, authentic Mexican food and a natural ocean environment, you can enjoy a wonderful day on the “Last Best Beach” of Barra de Potosi.

Barra de Potosi

Barra de Potosi is best known for its tranquil lagoon, perfect for swimming, scuba diving, snorkeling, and great seafood!  Photo by: blog.capellahotels.com

(more…)

Share

The Peace and Tranquility of Present Moment Yoga Retreat in Troncones Beach, Mexico

Every day is a Celebration of Peace at Present Moment Retreat in Troncones Beach, Mexico.  It is a place of peace, tranquility and love . . . along the oceanfront, surrounded by tropical flowers and aromas.  Located about 25 minutes north of Ixtapa Zihuatanejo off of Interstate Highway 200, it is a place to retreat for meditation and yoga on the weekdays or weekends.  Plus, the restaurant serves a variety of organic and vegetarian foods.

The resident Yogini and Co-Founder of Present Moment Retreat is CJ Ananda Page, originally from Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA.  She manages the resort’s Health and Wellness Division; facilitates 200 Hour Yoga Teacher Training Courses; and offers personal services such as Shamanic Healing, Reiki Energy Work, Wellness Counseling and Thai Massage.

C J Ananda - Present Moments

The resident Yogini and Co-Founder of Present Moment Retreat is CJ Ananda Page, originally from Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA.

(more…)

Share

A Whale of a Project Launches This Year to Study Humpback Whales and Support Safe, Informed Whale Watching Practices

By Katherina Audley.

January 2014 marks the official kickoff of the Whales of Guerrero Research Project.  During the northern winter, many Humpbacks play off the coast of the Ixtapa Zihuatanejo area. They are part of a large stock of whales that travel between Northern California, Oregon and Washington states coming south each winter.

humpbackwhale-breach-7

 Humpback whales migrate from Canada, south along the coast of Mexico in Banderas Bay, Puerto Vallarta.  Copyright (c) 2013 Oscar Frey – www.OceanFriendly.com

While we have known of the whales’ presence in our region for years, no formal studies of the whales in this southern region of the Eastern North Pacific have ever taken place. (more…)

Share

El Refugio Wildlife Preserve Teaches Conservation to Students, Residents and Visitors in Ixtapa Zihuatanejo

One of the main reasons that tourists come to Ixtapa Zihuatanejo and its surrounding communities is to enjoy the beauty of nature – our wildlife and flora.  But, we must protect and conserve it!  El Refugio de Potosi, our local wildlife preserve, is working to do that by teaching students, residents and visitors about wildlife that is endangered, at risk, or that requires special protection.

Since September 2013, El Refugio, with the assistance of the Zihuatanejo Municipal Department of Ecology, has been  presenting  a travelling Photo Gallery of endangered flora and fauna to help teach the community about conservation, entitled “La Naturaleza en Peligro” (The Nature in Danger).  Over 9,000 students have passed through the exhibit in the school tour.  The Photo Gallery also toured local hotels, the airport and other public places.  El Refugio is in the process of converting the Photo Gallery into a Powerpoint Presentation so that it can continue to be shown as an educational tool.

Refugio Photo Gallery

Over 9,000 students visited the Photo Gallery of endangered flora and fauna to learn about conservation.  The Photo Gallery also toured hotels and public places in Ixtapa Zihuatanejo.

(more…)

Share

Tropical Storm “Manuel” Causes Economic Damage in Ixtapa Zihuatanejo and Parts of Guerrero

On September 15th, 16th and 17th the State of Guerrero, including Ixtapa Zihuatanejo, was hard hit by Tropical Storm “Manuel.  The area also received heavy rains in October from Hurricane “Raymond.”  While most tourist facilities are now operating normally, many agricultural products were devastated by floods and the local fishing industry has been negatively impacted.

Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto, in a meeting with state officials last month, reported that approximately 196,500 hectares of land planted with corn, beans, coconut, mango, papaya and various other agricultural products were destroyed by the storm, which is about 40% of the entire planted land in the state.   Virtually, the entire corn crop in the state was destroyed. Many farmers lost their plots entirely.  Many livestock drowned.

maiz_final

(more…)

Share

Campus Yoga Event Comes to Ixtapa Zihuatanejo October 25-27, 2013

Ixtapa Zihuatanejo is a place for peace and relaxation. By the ocean, immersed in nature, you can reconnect with your inner self and find harmony with the environment.  Ixtapa Zihuatanejo is a perfect place for Campus Yoga 2013 from Friday – Sunday, October 25 – 27.   

Print

Campus Yoga is a three-day event that brings different disciplines and holistic practices such as Yoga, Tai Chi, Meditation, Alternative Medicine, Food and Music together. The event consists of conferences and classes taught by renowned yoga teachers, complemented by a series of related activities. (more…)

Share

Birds Do It; Bees Do It . . . Dolphins Like Sex Too!

By: The Editors

Dophins kissingOur objective was to visit Delfiniti Ixtapa, to observe and report on the care of our local dolphins that live there.  As investigative reporters we innocently asked the question, “What are you doing?” as we approached the marine caretakers gently “massaging” the dolphins as they lie on their backs.

“We’re masturbating the males,” they replied in Spanish.  Shocked and assuming that we erred in our language translation, we replied, “What did you say?” (more…)

Share

Ocean Waves – Nature’s Release of Energy

By: Barbara and Gunnar Erickson

ImageJPEG_0700As soon as I arrive at the coast, I head to the beach and enjoy the waves. Here along Guerrero’s Costa Grande, the emerald bay of Zihuatanejo, the long curve of Playa Blanca into Playa Larga, the stretch of soft sand that is Ixtapa and the rocky beaches of Troncones; the tropical water is always warm and the beaches call out for walks and beachcombing.  Standing at the tide line on Playa Blanca near Barra de Potosi, feeling the salty spray on my skin and face and sensing the power of the waves, I mused on the forces of nature that bring waves and shape our coasts.  And with the help of the Internet, I learned some things about them.

Ocean waves, like all waves (sound, electric, radio…) move energy. For the most part, ocean waves are generated by wind in the open sea. Wind moves from cooler dense areas (high pressure) to warmer less dense areas (low pressure).  Bursts of moving air press down on the surface of the sea, transferring some of the wind energy to the water and forming the wave. As the wind pushes the water, the waves begin to travel and take on some uniformity building into swells. (more…)

Share

El Refugio de Potosi, a Perfect Place to See Local Nature – Up Close and Personal

A “must see” stop for any visitor to Ixtapa Zihuatanejo is the delightful wild animal refuge and education center – El Refugio de Potosi.  Located on the road to Barra de Potosi, it is an easy jaunt to visit and then continue on to lunch and enjoy the beach in the quaint fishing village of Barra de Potosi.

At El Refugio, you will discover local ambassador animals that have been rescued and cannot be retuned to the wild; military macaws, a coatimundi, a Mexican dwarf porcupine and a pygmy owl named Chuelta, to name just a few. There are always new creatures in the process of rehab and recovery; one never knows who you might get to meet!

El Refugio de Potosi boasts the largest sperm whale skeleton on display in Mexico, a Humming Bird Common where you can always spot the endemic cinnamon and usually the double’s day (a rare fellow) among a host of others. Climb the panoramic 50 foot high observation tower to get a bird’s eye view of the area and perhaps a sighting of flocks of egrets, roseate spoonbills or wood storks – depending on the timing of your visit. (more…)

Share

Whale Bones?

Sea shells, rocks . . .  You can find many things along the beach shore, but whale bones? That’s what washed up on the rocks of Playa Blanca back in August of 2009 and subsequently  was brought to El Refugio de Potosi, the small, not-for-profit ecopark-animal refuge that is located in the small community of Barra de Potosí, Guerrero, Mexico, about 40 minutes from Zihuatanejo.  El Refugio is custodian to the only sperm whale skeleton in Mexico. (more…)

Share

Swimming with the Dolphins is Therapeutic for Children with Down Syndrome

I often go to the Delfiniti Dolphinarium in Ixtapa to write and to meditate.  The environment there is so peaceful.  I usually go early in the morning to watch the dolphins trai n with their handlers.

On separate occasions, I encountered parents with their childern who had come early to participate in the dolphinarium’s Animal Assisted Training (AAT) Program for Down Syndrome.  I was completely amazed by what I saw as the patient, the dolphin and the therapist interacted in a sort of choreographed symphony of communication.  The child would touch and press his ear to the dolphin and it responded by moving its body into the best position for the child’s access.  Amazing! (more…)

Share
Archives